Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
50-State HQ Special Education Teacher Report
Alabama : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Elementary Special Education Teachers

Elementary special education teachers must meet the same criteria outlined for general education elementary teachers to be considered highly qualified.

Middle/Secondary Special Education Teachers

Middle/secondary special education teachers must meet the same criteria outlined for general education teachers to be considered highly qualified.

IDEA 2004 added another option for properly certified middle/secondary special education teachers who are new to the profession, teach exclusively students with disabilities, and teach multiple subjects. A "new to the profession" middle/secondary special education teacher who teaches multiple subjects and who is highly qualified in language arts, mathematics, or science, at the time of being hired for the first time in a public school may meet the highly qualified teacher requirement in other core academic subjects taught through the state's HOUSSE option, not later than two (2) years after the date of initial employment. (The two-year period may extend beyond the end of the 2005-2006 school year.) [NOTE: Highly qualified status in general social science at the time of initial hiring does not establish eligibility for a new middle/secondary teacher to use the HOUSSE option.]

A special education teacher (Grades 7-12) who teaches exclusively students functioning as though they have a significant cognitive impairment, i.e., IQ equal to or less than 55, and participating in the Alabama Alternate Assessment may meet highly qualified teacher requirements based on any applicable option in the Alabama Model - Revised for a general education elementary teacher who is new or not new to the profession, or for a general education middle/secondary teacher who is new or not new to the profession.

  1. If a middle/secondary option is used, the teacher must adhere to the content-specific requirements, and must indicate the subject area(s) being taught when submitting a "checklist" or HOUSSE application.
  2. If an elementary option is used for a middle/secondary special education teacher (Grades 7-12), the LEA must submit a cover memorandum, signed by the local superintendent or authorized designee, and certifying that the teacher teaches core academic subjects exclusively to students functioning as though they have a significant cognitive impairment, i.e., IQ equal to or less than 55, and who will be assessed against alternate achievement standards.

Note: A special education teacher who provides only consultative/support services to a highly qualified general education teacher shall be considered a highly qualified special education teacher if s/he meets the state’s special education certification requirements for the grade level that s/he is assigned to teach.

Special education Teacher Teaching LANGUAGE:

A special education teacher who teaches LANGUAGE as a substitution for state-approved elementary language arts in Grades K-6 must:

  1. Hold proper special education certification to teach in elementary grades,
  2. Have completed LANGUAGE training, and
  3. Meet one of the state’s options from the Alabama Model – Revised for a new or not new to the profession elementary teacher or for a new or not new to the profession middle/secondary teacher.

Source: Alabama State Board of Education and Department of Education, Alabama Model for Highly Qualified Teachers-Revised 2006

HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects

Alabama Highly Qualified Teacher Application
HOUSSE Portfolio Option

The following teachers are eligible to use the HOUSSE portfolio option:
  • "NOT NEW" general education, elementary teacher
  • "NOT NEW" general education, middle/secondary teacher
  • "NOT NEW" special education, elementary teacher
  • "NOT NEW" special education, middle/secondary teacher
  • "NOT NEW" special education, teacher of Alternate Achievement Standards, only
OR
  • "NEW" special education, middle/secondary teacher who teaches multiple core academic subjects exclusively to students with disabilities, and is highly qualified in:
    • English language arts,
    • mathematics, OR
    • science.

Teacher applicants must hold at least a valid Class B Professional Educator Certificate, Alternative Baccalaureate-Level Certificate (ABC), Special Alternative Certificate, or Preliminary Certificate.

HOUSSE Portfolio Criteria Details

Teachers who earn 100 points for the portfolio option meet the federal "highly qualified teacher" requirement.

  • College Coursework in Content Area

    To be eligible to use the HOUSSE portfolio option, a general education or special education elementary (Grades K-6) teacher must have completed a minimum of 6 semester hours in each of the four content areas: English language arts (including reading), mathematics, science, and social science. A general education or special education middle/secondary (Grades 7-12) teacher must have at least 18 semester hours in the content area for which the teacher is certified and seeking highly qualified teacher status. Prerequisite hours can be counted in the total points for this category.

    • Measure: Semester hours-40 hours' maximum
    • Point Value: 1 point for each semester hour
    • Total Points: 40 points maximum

  • College Coursework in Professional Studies Related to Content Area

    Professional studies courses include the following: methods of teaching in the content area, learning styles, differentiating instruction for sub- groups of students, understanding the nature and needs of learners, classroom management, assessment/evaluation, reading, and educational/instructional technology. (General professional courses that are required of all students in teacher preparation programs, e.g., Foundations/Philosophy of Education, Directed Teaching/Internship/Practicum, Curriculum Design/Implementation., May not be counted.)

    • Measure: Semester hours-35 hours' maximum
    • Point Value: 1 point for each semester hour
    • Total Points: 35 points maximum

  • Professional Development Related to Content Area

    Professional development activities must meet the federal definition and criteria of high-quality professional development and Alabama's standards for high-quality professional development. These include professional development activities related directly to teaching in the content area for which the teacher is applying, that the teacher has taken within the last 10 years.

    • Measure: Number of activities-12 activities' maximum
    • Point Value: 3 points for each activity
    • Total Points: 36 points maximum

  • Professional Activities Related to Content Area

    Professional activities must relate directly to the content area for which the teacher is certified and seeking highly qualified teacher status and must provide clear evidence of exemplary knowledge and teaching skills in the content area.

    • Measure: Number of activities-5 activities' maximum
    • Point Value: 4 points for each activity
    • Total Points: 20 points maximum

  • Years of Public School Teaching Experience in the Content Area

    Includes the number of years of public school experience that a teacher will have taught in the content area in a public school as a fully certificated/licensed teacher by the end of the current school year. Service of one semester or more in a given year can be counted as one full year.

    Short-term or long-term substitute teaching, student teaching, teaching under an emergency certificate, teaching without a valid certificate, working as a teacher aide or paraprofessional, teaching summer school, and service of less than one semester during a given year may not be counted.

    Documentation of teaching experience must clearly state the subject/content area taught during each year or span of years. Only those years of teaching in the content area for which the teacher is seeking highly qualified status through this application may be counted. A Supplement EXP, the official state form for reporting experience, or a comparable document must be used as documentation. (Keep in mind that "Special Education" is not a core academic subject or content area.)

    • Measure: Years of public school experience in content area
    • Point Value: 2 points / yr. for each yr. within the past 10. 1 point for each yr. prior to the past 10.
    • Total Points: 30 points maximum

  • Recognition in Content Area

    Recognitions must be directly related to the content area for which the teacher is certified and seeking highly qualified teacher status and must provide clear evidence of exemplary knowledge and teaching expertise in the content area. All recognitions must be from the state, regional, or national level.

    • Measure: Number of recognitions 2 recognitions maximum
    • Point Value: 2 points for each recognition
    • Total Points: 4 points maximum

Source: Alabama Department of Education; High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE)-Revised


Alaska : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Highly Qualified Special Education Teachers

A teacher is highly qualified to teach special education if the teacher holds a valid teaching certificate issued under AS 14.20.015, AS 14.20.017, AS 14.20.020, or AS 14.20.022, endorsed in special education under 4 AAC 12.330 or 4 AAC 12.340, and:

  • Meets the applicable requirements of this section for the level and subject taught by the teacher, and for the teacher's employment experience
  • If the teacher teaches exclusively to the alternative performance standards described in 4 AAC 04.160, has achieved the required score or higher on one of the Praxis II examinations, regardless of the grade level in which the teacher teaches:
    1. Praxis II Examination Required Score for Elementary Education Content Knowledge-0014 is 143
    2. Praxis II Examination Required Score for Elementary Education Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment-0011 is 156
    3. Praxis II Examination Required Score for Multiple Subject Assessments for Teachers Content Knowledge-0140 is 146.
  • If the teacher was employed as a teacher before July 1, 2002, and teaches multiple subjects at the middle school or high school level, meets the high objective uniform standard for high school or middle school special education teachers of multiple subjects set out in 4 AAC 04.212(g) ; or
  • If the teacher is new to the profession and teaches multiple subjects at the middle school or high school level,
    • Is highly qualified in mathematics, language arts, or science as described below:
      1. Has a bachelor's or graduate degree in that subject from a regionally accredited institution of higher education;
      2. Has completed 30 semester hours or equivalent in that subject from regionally accredited institutions of higher education;
      3. Has obtained certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in that subject;
      4. Taught that subject in middle or high school in another state and was designated as highly qualified to teach that subject in middle or high school by that state, and if the designation was not revoked or withdrawn; or
    • If a middle school teacher, has achieved the required score or higher on the Praxis II examination for that subject:
      1. Middle School English Language Arts-0049 (passing score of 154)
      2. Middle School Mathematics-0069 (passing score of 145)
      3. Middle School Science-0439 (passing score of 136)
      4. Middle School Social Studies-0089 (passing score of 147); or
    • If a middle or high school teacher, has achieved the required score or higher on the Praxis II examination for that subject:
      1. Art Content Knowledge-0133 (passing score of 155)
      2. Biology Content Knowledge-0235 (passing score of 139)
      3. Chemistry Content Knowledge-0245 (passing score of 139)
      4. Earth Science Content Knowledge-0571 (passing score of 144)
      5. Economics-0910 (passing score of 460)
      6. English Content Knowledge-0041 (passing score of 158)
      7. French Content Knowledge-0173 (passing score of 157)
      8. General Science Content Knowledge-0435 (passing score of 149)
      9. General Science Content Knowledge, Part1-0431 and Part 2-0432 (passing score for part 1 is 146 and for part 2 is 138)
      10. Geography-0920 (passing score of 590)
      11. German Content Knowledge-0181 (passing score of 158)
      12. Government/Political Science-0930 (passing score of 610)
      13. Math Content Knowledge-0061 (passing score of 119)
      14. Musical Content Knowledge-0113 (passing score of 148)
      15. Physical Science Content Knowledge-0481 (passing score of 145)
      16. Physics Content Knowledge-0265 (passing score of 129)
      17. Social Studies Content Knowledge-0081 (passing score of 150)
      18. Spanish-0191 (passing score of 152)
      19. Speech Communication-0220 (passing score of 560)
      20. Theatre-0640 (passing score of 560)
      21. World and U.S. History-0940 (passing score of 440)
      22. World and U.S. History-0941 (passing score of 141) , and
  • Not later than two years after the date of employment, the district that employs the teacher determines, on a form prepared by the department, that the teacher meets the high objective uniform standard set out in 4 AAC 04.212(b) , or the high objective uniform standard for high school or middle school special education teachers of multiple subjects set out in 4 AAC 04.212(g) .

Source: Alaska Administrative Code AAC 04.210 (k)

HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects HOUSSE for Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Subjects

A teacher meets the high objective uniform standard for high school or middle school special education teachers of multiple subjects if the district that employs the teacher determines, on a form prepared by the department, that the teacher qualifies to receive at least 50 points under (b) of this section, for each subject area taught. In making this determination, a district

  1. May award no more than 25 points under (b)(1) of this section for each subject area; and
  2. Must require that at least five points be awarded under (b)(5) of this section for each subject area.

Source: Alaska Administrative Code; 4AAC 04.212(g)


Arizona : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers

Special Education Teachers (SPED)

SPED teachers must have a Bachelor's degree and full state certification as a special education teacher. For SPED teachers of record in core academic subject areas, they are required to meet the same subject matter competency requirements of elementary, middle grade, junior high, and secondary teachers.

Source: Arizona’s Model for Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals, FAQs

 rev. 05/2007

HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects New to the Special Education profession:

Multi-subject special education teachers, who are new to the profession, if highly qualified in Language Arts, Mathematics, or Science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE for Special Education Teachers to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire.

District and Charter Schools Arizona’s High, Objective, Uniform, State Standard of Evaluation AZ HOUSSE Rubric for Special Education 10/12/06 Core Content Area: _________________________________________

Years of Teaching Experience in the Core Academic Subject Area

College Coursework in the Core Academic Subject Area

Please complete a separate rubric for each core academic

Professional Development and Activities in the Core Academic Subject Area (Completed in last 10 years)

Service related to the Core Academic Subject Area

Awards, Presentations, Publications related to the Core Academic Subject Area

• Elementary level includes teaching experience in an elementary classroom • Middle and High School teaching includes departmentalized experience in the core academic subject area
• Visual Arts and Music teachers may count K-12 experience in these core areas

Elementary Content eachers of Record:

• Coursework in the elementary content areas:Mathematics; Reading/ English/Language; Arts; Science; Social Studies (Geography, History; Civics & Government, and Economics),

AND/OR

An Advanced Degree relevant to Elementary Education:

Example: Elementary Education

Middle & High School Teachers of Record: Coursework in the core academic subject areas:

Reading/Language; Arts/English; Mathematics Economics; Science (including Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics – a separate rubric should be completed for the various sciences) History; Geography; Foreign Languages; The Arts (Visual and Music)
• Methods course related to the core academic area (3 credit hours only)
• Middle/High School curriculum foundations (3 credit hours only)

• Participated in district approved professional conferences/ seminars/ workshops
• Completed all assessments for National Board Certification (20 points)
• Served on a committee that developed, selected, or evaluated academic standards and/or curriculum
• Served on a committee that developed, selected or evaluated professional teaching standards
• Served on a committee that aligned local academic standards with state standards

• Chair/team leader
• Mentor teacher
• Cooperating Leadership position in a regional, state, or national professional organization
• Instructor at an Institute of Higher Ed. in course related to the core academic subject area
• Presentations at the school/ district level in areas related to the core

• Recipient of a State or National Award
• Presentations at regional, state or national professional organization meetings
• Article in regional, state, or national journal

10 points per year
Maximum = 50 pts

4 points per credit hour

5 points per

documented activity

5 points per year per documented service
Maximum = 30 pts

5 points per documented activity

Maximum = 30 pts

# Years:

# Sem/Cr. Hrs., and/or Degree Area:

# Activities:

# Services:

# Activities:

TOTAL Points:

TOTAL Points:

TOTAL Points:

TOTAL Points:

TOTAL Points:


Source: Arizona Highly Qualified Teacher HOUSSE Rubric - Special Education

 rev. 05/2007


Arkansas : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers No state definition found for highly qualified special education teachers.

The Arkansas Department of Education Q & A for Special Education – NCLB and IDEA document highlights differences between highly qualified teachers and highly qualified special education teachers.

HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects

ARHOUSSE for Multi-Subject Teachers

To establish Highly Qualified status as a Multi-Subject teacher a teacher must teach in one of the Instructional Classes listed below, and teach two or more of the content areas listed below. To demonstrate content knowledge a minimum of 50 points is required per content area taught.

Instructional Classes

  • Alternative Learning Environment
  • Special Education
  • JDC, Residential, Other

Content Areas

  • English
  • Math
  • Art
  • Music
  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • Foreign Languages

The following would demonstrate content knowledge for Multi-Subject HQT criteria in full:

Praxis II: Middle School Content Knowledge (#20146)
100 points

Multi-Subject content test taken for licensure in another state
100 points

To demonstrate content knowledge by individual subject, the following evidence must be in the content areas indicated above. A teacher must accumulate a minimum of 50 points in each core content subject area that they are teaching.

College/University coursework in the content area(s)
3 points per credit hour

NBTS Certification for this content area (including Elementary)
100 points

Content-based Professional Development, or Content Knowledge Activities
1 point per hour, up to 8 points per year (40 pts max)

Teaching Experience in the content area
10 points per year (25 pts max)

Source: Arkansas Department of Education; HOUSSE for Multi-Subject Teachers


California : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Middle and High School Teachers New to the Profession

A teacher who meets NCLB requirements and is new to the profession at the middle and high school levels, in addition to having at least a bachelor’s degree and either being currently enrolled in an approved intern program for less than three years or holding a credential in the subject taught, must have passed or completed one of the following for every core subject currently assigned:

  1. A validated statewide subject matter examination certified by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing,
  2. University subject matter program approved by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing,
  3. Undergraduate major in the subject taught,
  4. Graduate degree in the subject taught, or
  5. Coursework equivalent to undergraduate major.

A new special education teacher who is currently enrolled in an approved special education intern program for less than three years or who holds a special education credential, and can demonstrate subject matter competence in mathematics, language arts, or science, may demonstrate competence in the other core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches through the High Objective Uniform State Standard Evaluation contained in article 2 section 6104 no later than two years after date of employment.

Source: California Administrative Code; Title 5, § 6111(b)

Note: The above link is to the California Department of Education site which links to California Administrative Code on a site supported by Westlaw. To access the information without a Westlaw login:

  • Under Regulations and Requirements click on: California State Board of Education No Child Left Behind Teacher Regulations
  • Click on Title 5. Education
  • Click on Division 1. California Department of Education
  • Click on Chapter 6. Certified Personnel
  • Click on Subchapter 7. No Child Left Behind Teacher Requirements
  • Click on Article 3. Middle and High School Level Teachers.
HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects No HOUSSE for new special education teachers teaching multiple core academic subjects found.

Colorado : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education Teachers

Teachers who are licensed as a Special Education Generalist and who are teaching at the Elementary Education level, through the 7th grade, have taken an Elementary Education content-area test (PLACE or Praxis), and are, therefore, fully qualified to teach in any core academic-content area.

Note: Licensed Special Education teachers, teaching at the Elementary Education level are considered to be “Highly Qualified,” as Elementary Education teachers.

Special Education teachers, who teach in core academic-content area(s), at the middle or high school (secondary) level, must meet the NCLB requirements for being “Highly Qualified, unless the Special Education teacher:

  • is already endorsed in the content-area in which that teacher is teaching; OR
  • has passed the approved content test in the content-area being taught; OR
  • has provided documented evidence of having completed 24-semester hours, or their equivalent, in the unendorsed content area

    Note: Previously-licensed Special Education teachers, endorsed in mild/moderate, severe, and/or profound, may not be considered “Highly Qualified” to teach in a content-area unless they are qualified in that content-area, or can meet one of the other options suggested in this section.

    Source: CDE Guidance for Highly Qualified Teachers in Colorado, page 15

  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects October, 2006
    The Department will decide whether to retain its HOUSSE for use with multi-subject rural secondary teachers and special education teachers of multiple subjects that are not new to the profession.

    Source: Colorado Department of Education; HQT State Plan (page 21)


    Connecticut : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers IDEA has provided some flexibility for special education teachers hired subsequent to July 1, 2006. In order to hire a special education teacher who will be a primary teacher of core academic content knowledge either in a resource room or self-contained classroom, that person must be “highly qualified” in one of following core academic content areas prior to being hired: reading/language arts/English, mathematics or science. Special education teachers then have up to two years to become “highly qualified” in the additional core academic subjects they will be teaching; districts may choose to use the district’s HOUSSE process for special education teachers to become designated as “highly qualified” in additional content areas.

    Source: Letter Connecticut Commissioner of Education; Series 2004-2005, Circular Letter C–10

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects The HOUSSE option specifics are decided at the district level.

    IDEA has provided some flexibility for special education teachers hired subsequent to July 1, 2006. In order to hire a special education teacher who will be a primary teacher of core academic content knowledge either in a resource room or self-contained classroom, that person must be “highly qualified” in one of following core academic content areas prior to being hired: reading/language arts/English, mathematics or science. Special education teachers then have up to two years to become “highly qualified” in the additional core academic subjects they will be teaching; districts may choose to use the district’s HOUSSE process for special education teachers to become designated as “highly qualified” in additional content areas.

    Source: Letter Connecticut Commissioner of Education; Series 2004-2005, Circular Letter C–10


    Delaware : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers

    New Middle and High School Teachers of One Core Academic Subject

    New middle and high school teachers are those with less than one full year of teaching experience (that is, new to the profession). The options are:

    • Praxis II in the academic subject taught, OR
    • An academic major in the academic subject taught, OR
    • The equivalent of an academic major (30 credit/semester hours) in the academic subject taught, OR
    • A graduate degree in the academic subject taught. These options apply to both regular and special education teachers of core academic subjects and to teachers who teach core academic subjects to English language learners.

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • District of Columbia : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Florida : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Exceptional Student Education Teachers (K-6) Teaching Elementary Education or Alternate Achievement Standards Courses

    In order to meet the highly qualified requirements at the elementary level, an ESE teacher who is the teacher of record for an elementary core academic course or an alternate achievement standards core academic course must meet the highly qualified requirements for elementary teachers in addition to the appropriate ESE certification.

    To be highly qualified, the teachers described above must satisfy the following three requirements by June 30, 2006.

    New ESE Teachers (No Teaching Experience)
    Requirement 1
    A bachelor’s or higher degree from an accredited or approved institution.
    Requirement 2
    A valid Florida three-year Temporary or five-year Professional Certificate in an appropriate exceptional student education area(s) to match the ESE table in the Florida Course Code Directory.
    Requirement 3

  • Option 1: A passing score on the Florida K-6, 1-6, or PK-3 subject area exam (SAE) appropriate for the elementary grade level(s) assigned; or
  • Option 2: A valid Florida Professional Certificate appropriate for the elementary grade levels assigned (requires a Florida SAE or reciprocity from another state); or
  • Option 3: A valid American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence (ABCTE) Passport Certificate in Elementary Education. (A passing SAE or valid ABCTE Certificate also establishes eligibility for certification in elementary education.)

    Experienced ESE Teachers (Teachers with one or more years of full-time teaching experience)
    Requirement 1
    A bachelor’s or higher degree from an accredited or approved institution.
    Requirement 2
    A valid Florida three-year Temporary or five-year Professional Certificate in an appropriate exceptional student education area(s) to match the ESE table in the Florida Course Code Directory.
    Requirement 3

  • Option 1: A passing score on the Florida K-6, 1-6, or PK-3 subject area exam (SAE) appropriate for the elementary grade level(s) assigned; or
  • Option 2: Meet the requirements for a HOUSSE plan that is appropriate for the elementary grade level(s) assigned; or
  • Option 3: A valid ABCTE Passport Certificate in Elementary Education or an Early (PreK-Primary) or Middle Childhood (Elementary Education) Generalist National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) Certificate. (A passing SAE, valid ABCTE, or valid NBPTS Certificate also establishes eligibility for certification in the subject.)

    Middle/Secondary Exceptional Student Education Teachers (7-12) Teaching Alternate Achievement Standards Courses

    ESE teachers who are teaching core academic subjects to ESE students in grades 7-12 on a modified curriculum (alternate achievement standards) and who take an ESE alternate assessment must meet the highly qualified requirements for elementary teachers or the subject matter knowledge appropriate to the level of instruction being provided (e.g., middle grades, Biology 6-12) in addition to an appropriate ESE certification.

    To be highly qualified, teachers teaching core academic subjects to exceptional education students working toward alternate achievement standards must satisfy the following three requirements by June 30, 2006.

    New ESE Teachers (No Teaching Experience)
    Requirement 1
    A bachelor’s or higher degree from an accredited approved institution.
    Requirement 2
    A valid Florida three-year Temporary or five-year A valid Florida three-year Temporary or five-year Professional Certificate in an appropriate exceptional student education area(s) to match the the Course Code Directory.
    Requirement 3 for Middle and Secondary (7-12)

  • Option 1: A passing score on the Florida K-6 or 1-6 subject area exam if appropriate for the level of instruction in the subject matter knowledge being provided; or
  • Option 2: or A valid Florida Professional Certificate in elementary education if appropriate for the level of instruction in the subject matter knowledge being provided (requires a Florida SAE or reciprocity from or another state); or
  • Option 3: A valid American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence (ABCTE) Passport Certificate in Elementary Education if appropriate for the level of instruction in the subject matter knowledge being provided. (A passing SAE or valid ABCTE Certificate also establishes eligibility for certification in elementary education.) or Option 4: Certification appropriate for the middle/secondary core academic subject(s) assigned.

    Experienced ESE Teachers (Teachers with one or more years of full-time teaching experience)
    Requirement 1
    A bachelor’s or higher degree from an accredited approved institution.
    Requirement 2
    A valid Florida three-year Temporary or five-year Professional Certificate in an appropriate exceptional student education area(s) to match the ESE table in exceptional student education area(s) to match the the Course Code Directory.
    Requirement 3 for Middle and Secondary (7-12)

  • Option 1: A passing score on the Florida K-6 or 1-6 subject area exam if appropriate for the level of instruction in the subject matter knowledge being provided. or
  • Option 2: Certification appropriate for the middle/secondary core academic subject(s) assigned. or
  • Option 3: Meet the requirements for a HOUSSE plan appropriate for ESE certified teachers of Core Academic Elementary Education or Core Academic Middle/Secondary Education Courses.

    Source: Florida Department of Education, No Child Left Behind Updated Chart for Highly Qualified Teacher Requirements

  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Georgia : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the reauthorized IDEA legislation of 2004 require special education teachers to be “highly qualified.” This section of the Georgia Guidelines for Highly Qualified Teachers outlines the requirements for special education teachers to be highly qualified.

    Consultative Special Education Teacher: To be “highly qualified” as a special education teacher in Georgia providing consultative special education services along with a classroom teacher who is instructing students in core academic content, the special education teacher must meet the following requirements:

    • Hold a 4-year college degree, or higher
    • Have a major or equivalent in the special education area(s) of exceptionality (ies) for which he/she provides consultative services, or passes the teacher certification examinations (Praxis II) in the appropriate special education area(s) of exceptionality (ies) at the P-12 grade levels
    • Hold a Georgia clear, renewable professional P-12 teaching certificate issued with a consultative descriptor that defines the area of exceptionality (ies) for which the special education teacher is qualified
    • Obtain a teaching assignment that is appropriate for the consultative descriptor and the area(s) of exceptionality (ies) listed on the certificate

    *(The term “consultative” is used to refer to the specific roles that special education teachers have when they are providing services in their area(s) of exceptionality (ies). The term incorporates references such as inclusion, mainstreaming, collaborative or co-teacher.)

    Consultative Special Education Teacher Teaching Core Academic Content

    To be “highly qualified” as a consultative special education teacher who is assigned as the teacher of record with the primary responsibility for instructing students in core academic content, the consultative special education teacher must:

    • Hold a 4-year college degree, or higher
    • Have a major or equivalent in a special education area of exceptionality (ies) for which he/she provides consultative services and/or pass the teacher certification examinations (Praxis II) in the appropriate special education subject area(s) of exceptionality (ies)
    • Hold a Georgia clear, renewable professional P-12 teaching certificate issued with
      • A consultative descriptor that defines the area of exceptionality (ies) for which the special education teacher is qualified, and
      • The core academic content for which the special education teacher is qualified to teach as the teacher of record.
    • Obtain a teaching assignment that is appropriate for the consultative descriptor and the area(s) of exceptionality (ies) and the core academic content area(s) listed on the certificate.

    Source: Georgia Standards Commission; NCLB Georgia Implementation Guidelines (8.01-8.03)

    HOUSSE Option for Special Education Teachers

    The “high objective uniform state standard of evaluation” (HOUSSE) may be used with a veteran teacher to assess his/her competency in the special education area of exceptionality and/or core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches. HOUSSE is required if a veteran teacher does not meet either the content or testing requirement for either the exceptionality or core academic content to be considered “highly qualified.” The HOUSSE may be used for veteran teachers either certified in Georgia or veteran teachers seeking Georgia certification who have three years or more of successful experience teaching core academic subjects based on annual teacher performance evaluations.

    A veteran teacher is one who is not new to the profession and is defined as a teacher in a public school who has been teaching a total of three or more complete school years.

    Source: Georgia Standards Commission; NCLB Georgia Implementation Guidelines (8.04)

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Special Education Teachers Who Teach Multiple Subjects Special education teachers who teach multiple core academic subjects exclusively to students with disabilities, whether new to the profession or not, must be highly qualified. Special education teachers who are not new to the profession must demonstrate competence in all core subjects they teach, just as all teachers not new to the profession. Veteran special education teachers must demonstrate competence in all core subjects they teach, just as all other veteran teachers. HOUSSE may be an option to allow veteran teachers to demonstrate subject-matter competency in each of the core academic subjects they teach.

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the reauthorized IDEA legislation of 2004 provide that special education teachers new to the profession who teach multiple core academic subjects and are highly qualified in either mathematics, language arts, or science at the time they are hired, have two years after the date of hire to become highly qualified in all other academic subjects they teach, including through use of a HOUSSE. A HOUSSE must be completed for each content area.

    The 2004 IDEA amendments provide that if a special education teacher teaches core academic subjects exclusively to students who are being assessed against alternate achievement standards, the teacher must meet the highly qualified requirements for elementary school teachers and, for instruction above the elementary level have subject-matter knowledge appropriate to the level of instruction being provided.

    A transition timeline for special education teachers certified currently in Georgia to become highly qualified to teach core academic content has been developed.

    Source: Georgia Standards Commission; NCLB Georgia Implementation Guidelines (8.05-8.07)

    Georgia HOUSSE

    Georgia Content Area Rubric

    Years of Experience in the Content Area: Maximum=50 points
    Experience must be in the subject/content area in a public or private P-12 school.

    • Experience teaching the subject at the appropriate level, e.g. Early Childhood, Middle Grades, Secondary (10 pts per year)
    • Experience teaching the subject at another P-12 or college level (5 pts per year)
    College Level Coursework in the Content Area: Maximum=70 points
    Coursework must be in the content specific to the subject area.
    • Academic major/degree in the specific subject/content area (50 points)
    • Graduate degree/s in the specific subject/content area
      • Master’s degree (10 pts)
      • Education Specialist degree (10 pts)
      • Doctoral degree (10 pts)
    School or System-Level Activities or Service Related to the Content Area: Maximum=30 points
    Activities must be professional in nature and specific to the subject/content area.
    • Service on a school/system committee that developed, selected or evaluated content standards
    • Service on a school/system committee that developed, selected or evaluated content curriculum
    • Service on a school/system committee that aligned local content standards with state standards
    • Service on a school/system committee to develop, validate, or evaluate content assessments
    • Completed local activities directly related to content area that were awarded PLU credits
    • Presenter/trainer in content workshop at the district level
    • Department chair or team leader
    • Mentor teacher
    • Cooperating teacher for student teacher or intern

    Points: 5 points for each year per documented service or activity (5 PLUs=5 points), 7 year recency of service or activity limit

    State, Regional or National Activities or Service Related to the Content Area: Maximum=30 points
    Activities must be professional in nature and specific to the subject/content area. For example:

    • Participation at regional, state, or national conferences, seminars or workshops related to the content area
    • Member of a regional, state, or national professional content organization
    • Officer of a regional, state, or national professional content organization
    • Instructor of a content course at a college/university
    • Service on state, regional, or national committee that developed, selected, evaluated or aligned content standards, content curriculum, or content assessments
    • Completion of state, regional or national activities related to content area that were awarded PLU credits

    Points: 5 points for each year per documented service or activity (5 PLUs=5 points), 7 year recency of service or activity limit

    Scholarship in the Content Area: Maximum=30 points
    Accomplishments must be content specific to the subject/content area. For example:

    • Recipient of the school district or State Teacher of the Year (*30 pts)
    • Recipient of state or national teaching award (*30 pts)
    • Recipient of school Teacher of the Year or Star Teacher (5 pts)
    • Content presentations at regional, state, or national professional content organization conferences (5 pts)
    • Publication of content article in a regional, state, or national journal (5 pts)
    • Authored published textbook (*30 pts)
    • Contributor to published textbook (5 pts)
    • Completion and submission of all assessments for National Board Certification (5 pts)
    • Acquisition of National Board Certification (*30 pts)

    Source: Georgia Professional Standards Commission; HOUSSE Rubric


    Hawaii : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education Teachers

    Special Education teachers must

    • Meet the same standards for content knowledge as general education teachers
    • Meet the state's special education certification requirements for the grade level they teach
    • Hold at least a bachelor's degree
    • Adhere to the NCLB Act of 2001 or the Individuals with disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA)
    • Hold a valid Hawaii special education license.

    Special Education Teachers REQUIRED to meet the NCLB/IDEA Highly Qualified Definition Core Academic Teacher

    The special education teacher is the primary teacher providing instruction to students with disabilities in a core academic subject.

    An elementary or middle/secondary special education teacher who teaches core academic subjects, in addition to holding proper certification for special education, must meet the NCLB/IDEA highly qualified teacher requirements for teachers either "new to the profession" or "veteran to the profession" as described in the Hawaii Model.

    Source: Department of Education; HOUSSE, Special Education

    Note: Special Education - Guiding Principals is currently not available on the Hawaii DOE site.

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 adds another option for special education teachers who teach multiple subjects and who are new to the profession. A "new to the profession" middle/secondary special education teacher who teaches multiple subjects and who is highly qualified in mathematics, language arts, or science may demonstrate competence in ALL of the other core academic subject taught through the state's single, high objective uniform state standard of evaluation (HOUSSE), not later than two (2) years after the date of employment.

    Source: Hawaii State Department of Education; HOUSSE, Special Education

    Note: Special Education - Guiding Principals is currently not available on the Hawaii DOE site.


    Idaho : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special education teachers must meet the requirements outlined in IDEA.

    New Special Education teachers must pass two Idaho state-approved assessments in Special Education (effective 9/1/04) and may have to meet content knowledge requirements for middle or secondary school certification (dependent upon IDEA reauthorization).

    Source: Idaho State Department of Education, Highly Qualified Teachers

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Special Education teachers need to fill out HOUSSE for each of their assigned core academic content teaching areas if they are primary/initial deliverers of core subjects.

    New Special Education teachers must pass two Idaho state-approved assessments in Special Education (effective 9/1/04) and may have to meet content knowledge requirements for middle or secondary school certification (dependent upon IDEA reauthorization).

    Idaho’s Highly Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE): Highly Qualified Teacher Rubric

    HOUSSE Requirements and Point Structure
    (Minimum of 100 + points = Highly Qualified)

    1. Bachelor’s Degree (Required of ALL teachers)
    2. State-Approved Teacher Preparation Program or Alternative Certification Program
    3. Current Valid Idaho and/or Out-of-State Certificate(s) for Assigned Teaching Area
    4. Endorsement(s) in Assigned Teaching Area
    5. Advanced Degree/National Board Certification in Assigned Teaching Area (100 points for advanced degree or NBCT)
    6. Credits Earned in Assigned Teaching Area (40 points)
    7. Idaho Educator Technology Assessment Course (20 points)
    8. Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Exam (20 points)
      • required for elementary and special education
    9. Ongoing Professional Development (15 clock hours/1 semester credit = 9 points per year Maximum = 45 points)
    10. One Year of Contracted Teaching Experience in Assigned Teaching Area (9 points per year of experience Maximum = 45 points)
    11. Related Work Experience (3 points per year of experience Maximum = 30 points)
    12. Advanced Degree Related to Assigned Teaching Area(s) (25 points per degree Maximum = 25 points)

    Source: Idaho Department of Education, HOUSSE Rubric


    Illinois : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education All Grade Levels

    A teacher who has primary responsibility for providing direct content instruction in a core academic area in a special education program and who received his or her first Illinois certificate on or after July 1, 2002, will be considered “highly qualified” if he or she:

    • holds a special preschool-age 21 (Type 10) certificate, or an elementary (Type 03), early childhood (Type 04), or secondary (Type 09) certificate endorsed for a special education field, and has passed the content-area test relevant to the special education area of endorsement on that certificate; or
    • holds a provisional certificate with an endorsement in a special education field based on certification in another state, possession, or territory of the U.S., or in another country (if applicable, must pass the relevant special education content-area test within nine months after receipt of the provisional certificate); or
    • holds an elementary (Type 03) or early childhood (Type 04) certificate with teaching approval in special education or short-term emergency certification in special education, is serving in the elementary grades, and has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test (or, through Grade 3, the Early Childhood test); or
    • holds a secondary (Type 09) or special K-12 (Type 10) certificate with teaching approval in special education or short-term emergency certification in special education, is serving outside the elementary grades, and:
      1. has passed the content-area test applicable to the core academic subject area of the teaching assignment or the special education content-area test applicable to the students served; or
      2. has completed a major or the coursework equivalent to a major in the core academic subject area of the teaching assignment; or
      3. holds a graduate degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment; or e) holds NBPTS certification in special education.

    Source: Illinois Administrative Code, Section 25, Appendix D, pages 319-335

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Points Available Under the Illinois HOUSSE

    The activities listed in this Appendix D shall be eligible for counting by teachers in general education, bilingual education, and special education. In the case of special education, a given activity, other than teaching experience, may be counted only if it relates to the core academic subject taught rather than special education as the “area of assignment”.

    • Teaching experience in the subject area of assignment: 12.5 points per semester, up to a maximum of 50 points. (Special education teachers may count teaching experience in special education as experience in each core academic subject taught.)
    • Completion of college coursework in the core academic subject area of assignment: 5 points per semester hour.
    • Possession of NBPTS certification or an Illinois master certificate applicable to the area of assignment: 100 points for a general education teacher in grades below 6 or a special education teacher.
    • Completion of the required content-area coursework within the context of completing an Illinois approved preparation program in elementary education or an approved out-of-state elementary education preparation program offered by an institution that was accredited by NCATE at the time: 75 points for a teacher in a self-contained general education classroom through Grade 8. Completion of the required content-area coursework within the context of completing an Illinois approved early childhood education preparation program or an approved out-ofstate early childhood preparation program offered by an institution that was accredited by NCATE at the time: 75 points for a teacher in a self-contained general education classroom through Grade 3. (This coursework may not also be counted for points under subsection (b).)
    • Participation in conference sessions, workshops, institutes, seminars, symposia, or other similar training events that are directly related to the area of teaching assignment: 1 point per full hour of participation.
    • Presenting at conference sessions, workshops, institutes, seminars, symposia, or other similar training events: 8 or 3 points, in accordance with Section 25.875(k) of this Part.
    • Work experience (non-teaching) directly related to the area of teaching assignment (e.g., experience in a chemical laboratory on the part of an individual teaching chemistry): 10 points per year of experience, up to a maximum of 50 points.
    • Supervising a student teacher in the subject area of assignment: 10 points per student teacher, applicable to all subjects.
    • Peer review or peer coaching that meets the requirements of Section 25.875(b) of this Part: 5, 8, 9, or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(b)(2) of this Part.
    • Mentoring a new teacher in the subject area of assignment, provided that the mentoring arrangement conforms to the requirements of Section 25.875(c)(1)(A) of this Part: 9 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(c)(2)(A) of this Part.
    • Participation in site-based management or decision-making teams, relevant committees, boards, or task forces directly related to school improvement plans and focused on the core academic subject of assignment: 8 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(d) of this Part. (May be counted only once per subject area.)
    • Teaching a college course in accordance with Section 25.875(j) of this Part that is directly related to the subject area of assignment: 20 points.
    • Participating in action research and inquiry projects that meet the requirements of Section 25.875(n) of this Part and are directly related to the subject area of assignment: 8 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(n)(2) of this Part.
    • Approved travel related to the area of teaching assignment and meeting the requirements of Section 25.875(p) of this Part: 12 or 15 points per year, in accordance with Section 25.875(p)(2) of this Part.
    • Participation in a study group directly related to the area of teaching assignment: 6 or 8 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(q) of this Part.
    • Participation in an internship directly related to the area of teaching assignment that meets the requirements of Section 25.875(s) of this Part: points in relation to contact hours per semester, as set forth in Section 25.875(s)(2) of this Part.
    • Participation in curriculum development or assessment activities that meet the requirements of Section 25.875(u) of this Part and are directly related to the subject area of assignment: 8 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(u)(2) of this Part.
    • Publication of educational articles, columns, or books that are directly related to the subject area of assignment: points in accordance with Section 25.875(x)(2) of this Part.
    • Teacher-to-teacher consultation that includes activities such as observation, meetings, and exchange of information (whether face to face or via communications technology) and that relates to topics such as materials, curriculum, evidence-based practices, and techniques and strategies aligned to the State Goals for Learning (see 23 Ill. Adm. Code 1, Appendix D): 1 point per hour of interaction with a teacher who is “highly qualified” in the relevant core academic subject area, up to a maximum of 50 points.
    • Possession of NBPTS certification or an Illinois master teaching certificate in an area other than in the area of assignment: 15 points.
    • Possession of an Illinois standard teaching certificate in an area other than in the area of assignment: 10 points.
    • Completion of a major or an approved program in special education with at least 15 points in each core academic subject taught: 75 points for a special education teacher who teaches two or more academic subjects exclusively to children with disabilities in the primary or middle grades.

    Source: Illinois Administrative Code, Section 25, Appendix D, pages 319-335


    Indiana : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Highly Qualified NEW Special Education Teachers
    • Must hold a valid Indiana special education teaching license; and
    • Meet Section C: “Highly Qualified New Teacher Requirements” for the school setting the individual is licensed to teach.

    The 2004 IDEA amendments provide that special education teachers new to the profession who teach multiple core academic subjects and who are highly qualified in mathematics, language arts, or science at the time they are hired, have two additional years after the date of hire to become highly qualified in all other core academic subjects they teach, including through use of the HOUSSE.

    This exception of a NEW teacher using the HOUSSE, applies ONLY to teachers who teach exclusively to special education students and who are highly qualified in one of the three specified core academic subjects (mathematics, language arts, or science) at the time they are hired.

    Source: Indiana Department of Education, Identifying Indiana’s Highly Qualified Teachers

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Highly Qualified NEW Special Education Teachers
    • Must hold a valid Indiana special education teaching license; and
    • Meet Section C: “Highly Qualified New Teacher Requirements” for the school setting the individual is licensed to teach.

    The 2004 IDEA amendments provide that special education teachers new to the profession who teach multiple core academic subjects and who are highly qualified in mathematics, language arts, or science at the time they are hired, have two additional years after the date of hire to become highly qualified in all other core academic subjects they teach, including through use of the HOUSSE.

    This exception of a NEW teacher using the HOUSSE, applies ONLY to teachers who teach exclusively to special education students and who are highly qualified in one of the three specified core academic subjects (mathematics, language arts, or science) at the time they are hired.

    Source: Indiana Department of Education, Identifying Indiana’s Highly Qualified Teachers


    Iowa : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Highly Qualified Special Education Teacher

    All Special Education teachers must

    • Hold at least a B. A.
    • State certification or license
    • Cannot hold an emergency or temporary certificate (Class C Endorsement)

    Highly Qualified Special Education Teacher -Elementary

    • Hold an elementary classroom endorsement & special education endorsement
    • Hold an elementary special education endorsement

    Highly Qualified Special Education Teacher–Middle and High School Teachers of Core Content

    • Hold secondary special education endorsement
    • Hold endorsements for each subject area they teach

    Source: Iowa Department of Education; IDEA

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Kansas : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Kansas NCLB HOUSSE Checklist for Special Education Teachers

    Special education and English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) teachers who provide "direct instruction" in one or more core content areas will need to meet NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) requirements.

    The content requirements pertain only to individuals who are coded as "special education" or "ESOL" teachers in the Licensed Personnel Report and who provide direct instruction in a core (English Language Arts, Science, Social Studies or Math) content area(s) for one or more students. Direct instruction is defined as being either the teacher of record or the teacher responsible for introducing new content material and providing initial instruction.

    There are many activities that special education or ESOL teachers may carry out that would not, by themselves, require the teacher to meet the HQT content requirements. Special educators or ESOL teachers who assist students with study skills, organizational skills or reinforce instruction that the child has already received from a highly qualified content teacher and do not directly instruct students in core academic subjects do not need to demonstrate subject matter competency.

    Special education or ESOL teachers who provide "direct instruction" in English Language Arts, Science, Social Studies or Math have three different options available to use when demonstrating subject matter competency:

    • Appropriate content endorsement on teaching license has been designated "HQ", or
    • Pass the appropriate content test (PRAXIS II), or
    • Document eleven or more checks on the Kansas HOUSSE document for special education and ESL teachers.

    Only special education content teachers or ESOL content teachers should use this HOUSSE option. The Kansas Content Area Rubric is available for all other core content teachers.

    Source: Kansas Department of Education; http://www.ksde.org/cert/SPED%20HQT%20explanation.doc

    Source: Kansas Department of Education; Special Education HOUSSE Rubric; http://www.ksde.org/cert/NCLBHOUS.doc

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Kentucky : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers IDEA 2004 requires all special education teachers to be highly qualified in special education.

    Highly qualified in special education means:

    • The teacher has obtained full state certification as a special education teacher, or
    • The teacher has obtained a temporary provisional certificate as a special education teacher through an alternative route to certification.
    Additionally, a special education teacher who holds an emergency, adjunct, temporary (not temporary provisional), conditional, or probationary certificate is not a highly qualified special education teacher.

    Source: Kentucky Educational Professional Standards Board; Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Louisiana : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Since students with disabilities are expected to meet the same standards as other students, teachers who deliver instruction to special needs students are required to meet the same standards for content knowledge. Students with disabilities are to receive instruction in core academic subjects from a teacher who is highly qualified to teach the core academic subjects. In addition, teachers of students with disabilities must meet the state's special education certification requirements for the grade level that they are teaching in order to be identified as highly qualified. Teachers of students with disabilities holding a non-standard certificate [e.g., a Temporary Authority to Teach (TAT) or an Out-of-Field Authority to Teach (OFAT) do not meet the NCLB definition of highly qualified].

    Source: Loisiana Department of Education; HQ Special Education Teachers

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Maine : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers The Maine Department of Education is in the process of updating their website to reflect recent changes in their highly qualified teacher requirements.

    ECS will post updated information as it is made available.

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects The Maine Department of Education is in the process of updating their website to reflect recent changes in their highly qualified teacher requirements.

    ECS will post updated information as it is made available.


    Maryland : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education is not a core academic subject under NCLB guidelines. However, special education teachers must meet the federal “highly qualified” standards if they are the teacher of record (responsible for the academic grade) for students in core academic subjects.

    If you are a special education teacher who is the teacher of record for students in a core academic subject, these are your options for becoming highly qualified:

    • Take and pass the appropriate Praxis II test(s) in the area of your teaching assignment
    • Meet highly qualified standards under HOUSSE
    • For each academic area you teach, take course work and pass the Praxis II test(s) or pass the Praxis II test(s) to add the endorsement.

    Source: Maryland Department of Education; Special Education

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Massachusetts : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Highly Qualified Special Education Teachers

    Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities; Teacher of Young Children with and without Disabilities; Teacher of the Deaf or Hard of Hearing; Teacher of the Visually Impaired; and Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities.

    The following are options for demonstrating subject matter competency:

    • Passing the appropriate subject matter MTEL test; or
    • Completing the appropriate HOUSSE plan (see question 4 below).

    Additional options for all special education teachers now available under IDEA-2004 include demonstrating subject matter competency through:

    • Possession of an academic major in the appropriate subjects;
    • A graduate degree in the appropriate subjects;
    • Completion of coursework equivalent to an undergraduate academic major in the appropriate subjects; or
    • National or American Board Certification in the field.

    NCLB allows states to develop a high objective uniform state standard of evaluation (HOUSSE plan) in order to allow teachers to demonstrate subject matter competency. Teachers in Massachusetts may demonstrate this subject matter competency through an individual professional development plan and the completion of professional development activities.

    In order to meet the highly qualified subject matter competency standards through HOUSSE, Massachusetts teachers are required to have a total of 120 Professional Development Points (PDPs) with 80% or 96 PDPs focusing on the content or content pedagogy of the core academic subjects that they teach.

    If a special education teacher wishes to demonstrate competency in more than one subject, at least 10 PDPs of the 96 PDPs must be accrued in each core academic subject that the teacher teaches - for a total of 96 PDPs across the subject areas -- in order to demonstrate subject matter competency in those areas.

    Source: Massachusetts Department of Education; Highly Qualified Q&A

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Michigan : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers "Highly Qualified" means the teacher holds a valid Michigan Teaching Certificate and an appropriate required special education endorsement for each teaching assignment

    plus can demonstrate competence in each of the core subject areas taught or assigned to teach.

    Source: Michigan Department of Education; http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Highly_Qualified_Packet_of_Information_5-27-05_126905_7.doc

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Minnesota : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers IDEA 2004 “Highly Qualified” Requirements for Special Education Teachers

    In December 2004, Congress reauthorized the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and clarified that special education teachers must meet the following requirements:

    1. Hold a bachelor’s degree;
    2. Be licensed by the state in special education; and
    3. In certain contexts, also demonstrate subject matter competence. Those who must demonstrate subject matter competence in order to meet federal “highly qualified” requirements may do so through licensure or through the “high objective and uniform state system of evaluation” (also called HOUSSE) process.

    Source: Minnesota Department of Education; Minnesota State Plan For Federal “Highly Qualified” Teacher Requirements-Revised

    All special education teachers who teach one or more core academic subjects to children with disabilities must verify their “highly qualified” status in accordance with IDEA 2004 “highly qualified” special education teacher requirements.

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects All special education teachers who teach one or more core academic subjects to children with disabilities must verify their “highly qualified” status in accordance with IDEA 2004 “highly qualified” special education teacher requirements.

    Special education teachers teaching multiple subjects who are already highly qualified in language arts, math or science upon hire may use the HOUSSE to demonstrate within two years of hire their “highly qualified” status in the other core academic subjects they teach.


    Mississippi : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Missouri : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education

    No Child Left Behind – addressed teachers of core content subjects

    Highly Qualified:

    • Applies to any public elementary school or secondary school teacher
    • Teacher holds a bachelor’s degree, AND
      1. Has obtained full state certification, AND
      2. Demonstrates competence in all academic subjects in which the teacher teaches

    Competence can be shown through test (i.e., Praxis) or through HOUSSE standard (generally, a points system where credit is given for a variety of contentspecific activities and education/professional development)

    Source: Missouri Department of Education; Highly Qualified Teachers; Special Education

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No HOUSSE

  • Montana : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Proposed rule defining special education highly qualified status and HOUSSE option currently going through approval process (March, 2006).

    Source: Montana Office of Public Instruction; OPI Comments in Response to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM),www.opi.state.mt.us

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Nebraska : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Highly Qualified Special Education Teachers

    Nebraska has only one HOUSSE process that will be used by all elementary, middle, secondary and special education teachers not holding appropriate content endorsements for classes they are teaching.

    Veteran special education teachers who teach core academic subjects to students who are being assessed against alternate achievement standards must meet the qualifications for elementary school teachers (8th grade instructional level), or if the instruction is above the elementary level, for the level of content knowledge being provided for the students. Beginning in 2006-07, if these teachers do not have appropriate content endorsements, they will utilize the HOUSSE to determine if they have the necessary content knowledge to be NCLB qualified.

    Source: Nebraska Department of Education; NCLB/SPECIAL EDUCATION FAQ

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Nevada : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS WHO ARE NOT NEW

    The following special education teachers who are NOT NEW may meet the requirements to be highly qualified through the HOUSSE option for demonstrating competency:

    • Special education teachers who teach a single core academic subject exclusively to students with disabilities;
    • Special education teachers who teach more than one core academic subject area exclusively to students with disabilities; and
    • Special education teachers who teach core academic subjects exclusively to students assessed against alternate achievement standards.

    In addition, NOT NEW special education teachers who teach multiple core academic subjects, if they are already highly qualified in Language Arts, Mathematics, or Science may demonstrate competency in additional core academic subjects if they have 2 years verified full-time teaching experience in the core academic subject area(s) and in the appropriate grade span, and meet an additional requirement as outlined under B or C of the Nevada HOUSSE.

    Source: Nevada Department of Education; "Highly Qualified" Teacher Requirements, Meeting the "Highly Qualified" Definition (rev. 3/16/06)

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • New Hampshire : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Secretary Spellings have signed the proposed regulations to implement the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA). This follows a concerted effort by many in OSERS to review the old and new law, receive public comments, and draft the proposed regulations. So that members of the public will have as much time as possible to review the proposed regulations, the Department has posted an unofficial copy on its Web site at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/unofficial_proposed_idea-regs.doc. The following is from the proposed regulation:

    "A new definition of highly qualified special education teacher would be added in proposed §300.18, reflecting the addition of a definition of this term to the statute in section 602(10) of the Act, with the following modifications: Paragraph (a)(1) of this section would specify that the term "highly qualified" applies only to public elementary school and secondary school special education teachers, consistent with the definition of that term in section 9101 of the ESEA, which is incorporated into the Act and applied to special education teachers in section 602(10) of the Act. We do not believe that the "highly qualified" requirements of the ESEA, or, by statutory cross-reference, the Act, were intended to apply to private school teachers, even in situations where a child with a disability is placed in, or referred to, a private school by a public agency in order to carry out the public agency's responsibilities under this part, consistent with section 612(a)(10)(B) of the Act and proposed §300.146. This issue also is addressed in proposed §300.156."

    Source: New Hampshire Department of Education; Bureau of Special Education

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Special Education teachers who are new to the profession, and who are highly qualified in Reading/English Language Arts, or Mathematics, or Science will have two additional years from the date of hire to complete the HQT requirement for the additional subjects that they teach.

    Source: New Hampshire Department of Education; Highly Qualified Elementary K-6 Teacher Identification HOUSSE Rubric


    New Jersey : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Modification to Forms in The New Jersey Model for Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers:

    Form A has been modified to include special education teachers in grades 9-12 who are instructing students in academic content at the elementary level.

    Source: New Jersey Department of Education; The New Jersey Model for Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects New (first-year) special education teachers who teach multiple content areas in middle or secondary settings and who have passed a content test or hold a degree in math, science, or language arts have up to two years from their date of hire to demonstrate content expertise in the remaining content area(s) they teach. These teachers may use the NJ HOUSE Standard: Content Knowledge Matrix to accrue 10 points in each remaining content area or may pass relevant content area exam(s). This flexibility is open to new special education teachers in both Title I and non-Title I schools.

    Source: New Jersey Department of Education; The New Jersey Model for Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers


    New Mexico : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers “A highly qualified K-12 special education teacher,” under this rule, means a teacher who is fully qualified to teach special education students by either providing access for those students to a regular education classroom where instruction in the core academic subjects is delivered by a highly qualified regular education teacher, and where the special education teacher shall meet the requirements of Paragraphs (1) and (2) below; or, if the special education teacher teaches the core academic subjects to special education students who are assessed under regular education standards, and is fully qualified to teach each core academic subject the teacher teaches, and where that teacher also meets the requirements of Paragraphs (1) and (2) and (3) below; or if the special education teacher teaches the core academic subjects exclusively to children who are assessed against alternate achievement standards and where the teacher also meets the requirements of Paragraphs (1) and (2) and either (3) or (4):
    1. The teacher meets the requirements for his/her special education license;
    2. The teacher has no special education licensure requirements waived on an emergency or temporary basis, or for any other reason;
    3. The teacher has demonstrated competency in any core academic subjects the teacher teaches by:
      • Passing the elementary teacher competency or the elementary content knowledge test of the New Mexico teacher assessments or predecessor New Mexico teacher licensure examinations, or accepted comparable licensure tests offered in New Mexico or in another state, if the special education teacher teaches in an elementary school; or
      • Passing the content knowledge test(s) of the New Mexico teacher assessments or predecessor New Mexico teacher licensure examinations, or accepted comparable licensure tests from another state in each subject area the teacher teaches if the teacher teaches in a middle or high school; or
      • Successfully completing an undergraduate academic major (24-36 semester hours), or coursework equivalent to an undergraduate major, or a graduate degree in each subject area the teacher teaches; or
      • Obtaining advanced credentials, which means content area or special education certification by the national board for professional teaching standards for the appropriate grade level and type; or
      • Demonstrating competence in all of the core academic subjects the teacher teaches based on the state’s high objective uniform standard of evaluation for subject area competence as provided in 6.69.4.9
    4. The teacher has demonstrated competency in the core academic subjects, regardless of the grade level taught, by passing the elementary or secondary teacher competency test, or the elementary content knowledge test, or any one of the middle level or secondary level content knowledge tests in the core academic areas of the New Mexico teacher assessments or comparable predecessor New Mexico teacher licensure examinations, or accepted comparable licensure test(s) from another state.

    Source: New Mexico Administrative Code 6.69.4.8 (E)

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

    Note: 6.69.4.9 (D)(2) NMAC specifically addresses HOUSSE credit hour requirement for Special Education Teachers who teach multiple subjects. In addition, nothing in the portfolio requirement in 6.69.4.9 (D)(4) NMAC precludes portfolio presentation in multiple subjects.


  • New York : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers IDEA REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS
    • A teacher of a “special class” for students with disabilities in grades 7-12 or the age equivalent must meet the NCLB definition of “highly qualified” for middle/secondary assignments, with one exception noted below. This is a change from previous New York State guidance, which was superseded when the IDEA was reauthorized in December 2004.
    • The exception is that the IDEA permits a teacher to use the definition of “highly qualified” for elementary assignments when s/he teaches a “special class” whose students with disabilities of any grade or age all qualify for the New York State Alternate Assessment (NYSAA).

    Source: New York State Education Department; Field Memo #03- 2006

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects The IDEA gives a teacher an extended deadline of two years from his/her date of employment provided that the teacher:
    1. Is “new to the profession” (in his/her first year of certification);
    2. Is teaching two or more core academic subjects in a “special class” for students with disabilities in grades 7-12 or the age equivalent; and
    3. Is “highly qualified” for at least one subject s/he is teaching by virtue of having a certificate with one of the following titles: Students with Disabilities (SWD) 5-9 Generalist, SWD 5-9 English, SWD 5-9 Math, SWD 5-9 Science, SWD 7-12 English, SWD 7-12 Math or SWD 7-12 Science.

    Source: New York State Education Department; Field Memo #03- 2006


    North Carolina : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers To be designated “Highly Qualified,” new elementary and new special education teachers must pass a rigorous state test (currently PRAXIS II).

    Source: North Carolina Public Schools; HQT FAQ

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • North Dakota : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers The State HOUSSE for elementary education teachers includes successful completion of a major in elementary education from an approved teacher education program. Current teachers, including special education teachers, who hold the elementary education professional educator’s license do meet the highly qualified requirements for teaching core academic subjects in grades one through eight in an elementary school.

    A preschool or kindergarten teacher must have the appropriate licensure and endorsement corresponding to early childhood, kindergarten, or early childhood special education.

    In North Dakota, the rigorous State academic subject matter test is the Praxis II. Information about the Praxis II is available on the Education Standards and Practices Board (ESPB) website at http://www.state.nd.us/espb/ or at ets.org.

    All elementary education teachers who are “new to the profession” hired for the 2005 – 2006 school year will need to take and pass the Praxis II content test 0011 and the PLT test 0522 before the end of the 2005 – 2006 school year in order to be eligible for continued employment.

    Some schools are Title I targeted assistance schools and some are Title I schoolwide schools. For special education teachers in a Title I schoolwide program, additional regulations apply. In a schoolwide program, all teachers hired for the 2005 – 2006 school year must be highly qualified before they are eligible for employment. Therefore, all new teachers at the elementary level, including special education teachers, must have taken and passed the Praxis II tests before they are eligible for employment.

    Special education teachers who hold a North Dakota professional educator’s license plus additional special education credentials, subject to administrative rule, are qualified to provide special education support services in Kindergarten through grade twelve.

    Source: North Dakota Education Standards and Practices Board; DRAFT: Highly Qualified Special Education Teachers

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Ohio : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Multi-subject special education teachers hired after the end of the 2005-2006 school year who are highly qualified in language arts, mathematics or science when they are hired will continue to have the HOUSSE option to show competence in additional subjects.

    Source: Ohio Department of Education; Center for the Teaching Profession-Hot Topics


    Oklahoma : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education - Grades PK -12

    Veteran teachers in the Profession PRIOR TO December 3, 2004, are required to have Certificate in Special Education PLUS Build HOUSSE* single core subject areas OR pass appropriate test - specific subject area.

    New teachers to the Profession AFTER December 3, 2004, are required to have Special Education Certificate AND appropriate certificate in Early Childhood OR Elementary Education OR Middle or Secondary Education in Math OR Science OR Language Arts certificate PLUS In order to teach all other core academic subjects and be the teacher of record, these teachers will have two years from date of employment to become highly qualified in each core academic subject taught. They may build a HOUSSE* in single core subject areas or pass appropriate test–specific subject area.

    Additional Options to be Highly Qualified for Middle Level or Secondary: (Not an option for PK-5 early childhood/elementary education or 6-8 elementary education self contained classes.)

    • Complete an undergraduate major or coursework equivalent to undergraduate major (24 semester hours) in academic subject taught (Does not include elementary education coursework or special education coursework) OR
    • Hold a Graduate Degree in subject area taught (Does not include elementary education graduate degree or special education graduate degree) OR
    • Hold certification through National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in subject taught.

    Source: Oklahoma State Department of Education; Special Education Highly Qualified Requirements At a Glance

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Oregon : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special Education Teachers

    Special Education teachers who are providing instruction in core academic subject also must meet the “highly qualified” standards of the law. However, special educators who do not directly instruct students on any core academic subject, or who provide only consultation to highly qualified teachers of core academic subjects in adapting curricula, using behavioral supports and interventions, and selecting appropriate accommodations, are not subject to the same requirements that apply to teachers of core academic subjects.

    Elementary Special Education Teachers

    If hold an elementary special education endorsement or an elementary endorsement or authorization with special education, then highly qualified to teach K-8 self-contained special education classroom.

    Middle-level/Secondary Special Education Teachers

    If teaching core academic subject, must have a partnership relationship with a highly qualified teacher in the core academic area if not highly qualified in the subject matter area.

    Source: Teacher Standards and Practices Commission of Oregon; NCLB

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Pennsylvania : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects The new HOUSSE program provides that experienced Pennsylvania teachers or new special education teachers who teach multiple core academic subjects in middle and secondary settings and who qualify for the additional flexibility under IDEA may demonstrate subject matter competency and be designated as “highly qualified” upon the obtainment of 100 points, documented through achievements in the following areas:
    • Years of satisfactory teaching experience in the core academic subject,
      (5 points per year, minimum of 5 points required, maximum of 45 points)
    • College and graduate coursework in the core academic subject, verified by a transcript from a regionally accredited college/university with each course passed at a 2.0 level or above,
      (5 points for every 1 semester credit in core academic subject, maximum of 95 points)
    • Professional education courses in core academic subject and/or in related teaching, curriculum instruction or assessment courses related to the core academic subject,
      (5 points for every 30 professional development hours)
    • Advanced degree in teaching, curriculum instruction or assessment related to the core academic subject,
      (25 points)
    • Academic scholarship and awards related to core academic subject, examples include: teacher awards, authored journal articles or textbooks, instructor of college course,
      (5 to 50 points)
    • Pennsylvania Instructional II, Special Education Certificate.
      (25 points)
    Teachers successfully completing Pennsylvania’s HOUSSE program by documenting 100 points in the above categories have demonstrated subject matter competency through Pennsylvania’s high objective state standard of evaluation and are highly qualified under NCLB.

    Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education; HOUSSE


    Puerto Rico : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Rhode Island : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers The Rhode Island Department of Education Website was offline during the update of this data.

    ECS will post updated information as it is made available.

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects The Rhode Island Department of Education Website was offline during the update of this data.

    ECS will post updated information as it is made available.


    South Carolina : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Definition of Highly Qualified Teacher

    Highly qualified teachers are those teachers that have earned at least a bachelor's degree, demonstrated content knowledge in each core content area he/she teaches, do not have any waivers of the requirements for full state certification.

    A teacher is considered to meet the certification requirements for being highly qualified if he/she has one of the following certificates:

    • Initial
    • Critical Need (PACE)
    • Professional (including Regular/Grade A certificates issued prior to 1970)
    • International
    • Intern
    • Restricted

    Source: South Carolina Division of Educator Quality and Leadership; HQT Definitions

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects Guidelines for the Multi-Subject HOUSSE Evaluation (January 2006) options are available for teachers of:

    Source: South Carolina Department of Education; HOUSSE


    South Dakota : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Tennessee : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers

    Special Education Teachers

    While special education teachers who only provide consultative services are excluded from meeting the highly qualified requirements, current guidance indicates that special education teachers, who teach core academic subjects at the middle or secondary level, must meet the subject specific requirements. For those special education teachers who teach core academic subjects, the U.S. Department of Education is expected to issue guidance on how states can establish procedures for those teachers to demonstrate competency in the core content areas. The state will await further guidance and the reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to define the specific requirements pertaining to special education teachers.

    Source: Tennessee Department of Education; Tennessee Plan

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Texas : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

    When used with respect to any public elementary school or secondary school special education teacher teaching in a State, such term means that:

    • The teacher has obtained full State certification as a special education teacher (including certification obtained through alternative routes to certification), or passed the State special education teacher licensing examination, and holds a license to teach in the State as a special education teacher, except that when used with respect to any teacher teaching in a public charter school, the term means that the teacher meets the requirements set forth in the State's public charter school law
    • The teacher has not had special education certification or licensure requirements waived on an emergency, temporary, or provisional basis
    • The teacher holds at least a bachelor's degree.

    (Chart 2)

    HOUSE Option for Secondary Special Education Teachers

    The special education teacher has at least one creditable year of teaching experience in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field and must document 24 points derived from:

    • Meeting the standard for Elementary Highly Qualified
      [ 9 points for competency in Reading/Language Arts, Math, Science, or Social Studies ]; OR
    • Passing an appropriate TExES Certification Exams:
      • EC-12 Special Ed [ for competency in Reading/Language Arts or Math ]; or
      • 4-8 Generalist [ for competency in Reading/Language Arts, Math, Science, or Social Studies ]; or
      • 4-8 Content Specific Exam [ for specific content area only ][ 12 points ]
      AND
    • Experience teaching in the core academic subject area or related field at the secondary level [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points)2 ]; AND/OR
    • College coursework in the core academic subject area or closely related field3 [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; AND/OR
    • Professional development in the core academic subject area or related field3 that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit {as defined in TAC, Title 19, Part 7, Chapter 232, Subchapter R} [ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ].

    (Chart 5)

    Source: Texas Education Agency; GUIDANCE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NCLB HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHER REQUIREMENTS, http://www.tea.state.tx.us/nclb/hq.guidance.070705.web.pdf

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Utah : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Vermont : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special educators who are performing primary instruction or team teaching roles in one or more of the core academic content areas (English language arts/reading, math, science, and social studies) for one or more students must meet HQT licensure and content knowledge requirements. HQT requirements can be met by meeting coursework/professional development credit requirements or through content knowledge exams.

    To be HQT for his/her assignment, a special educator must carry an endorsement appropriate to the assignment AND must meet the HQT content knowledge requirements for the highest present level of performance of the students taught by the educator (which is not necessarily the students’ actual grade levels). The appropriate endorsement for any special education assignment is a special education endorsement (i.e., Special Educator, Consulting Teacher, Intensive Special Education Teacher, Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired, Educational SLP, Director of Special Education, Career and Technical Special Needs Teacher). In addition, the instructional levels of the endorsement used must encompass the actual grade(s) taught (e.g., grades K – 8, grades K – age 21, grade 7 – age 21) in order to be appropriate for the assignment. Source: Vermont Department of Education; HQT Special Education

    Source: Vermont Department of Education; HQT Special Education

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Virgin Islands : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers
  • No information found.
  • HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Virginia : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers All Special Education Teachers

    All special education teachers must meet the following general requirements:

    • Hold at least a B.A.
    • Must obtain full state special education certification or equivalent licensure
    • Cannot hold an emergency or temporary certificate.

    New or veteran elementary school teachers teaching one or more core academic subjects only to children with disabilities held to alternative academic standards (most severely cognitively disabled), in addition to the general requirements above, may demonstrate academic subject competence through “a high objective uniform State standard of evaluation” (the HOUSSE process).

    Source: Virginia Department of Education; Virginia Requirements to Be a Highly Qualified Special Education Teacher

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects All Special Education Teachers

    All special education teachers must meet the following general requirements:

    • Hold at least a B.A.
    • Must obtain full state special education certification or equivalent licensure
    • Cannot hold an emergency or temporary certificate.

    New teachers of two or more academic subjects who are highly qualified in either mathematics, language arts, or science, in addition to the general requirements above, have a two-year window in which to become highly qualified in the other core academic subjects. This can be done through the HOUSSE process.

    Source: Virginia Department of Education; Virginia Requirements to Be a Highly Qualified Special Education Teacher


    Washington : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special education teachers, at all levels, who teach core academic content as part of their teaching assignment are required to meet NCLB content area knowledge requirements. At the elementary level they must meet the same requirement as elementary education teachers. At the secondary levels they must meet NCLB content area knowledge requirements in each core academic subject they are teaching. See the new Points-Based HOUSSE.

    Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction; NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher Workbook

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • West Virginia : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Elementary special education teachers (new and not new to the teaching profession) who are teaching one or more core academic subjects to students with severe cognitive disabilities (students who are assessed on the WV Alternate Assessment) may be considered highly qualified if the teacher meets full WV certification requirements in the specific area of exceptionality in special education as outlined in WV Board of Education Policy 5202 (Minimum Requirements for the Licensure of Professional and Paraprofessional Personnel and Advanced Salary Classifications), AND can demonstrate competence in areas of the basic elementary school curriculum or through a “high objective uniform state standard of evaluation” or HOUSSE.

    Middle or high school special education teachers (new and not new to the teaching profession) who are teaching one or more core academic subjects only to children with severe cognitive disabilities (students who are assessed on the WV Alternate Assessment) may be considered highly qualified if the teacher demonstrates “subject matter knowledge appropriate to the level of instruction being provided, as determined by the State, needed to effectively teach to those standards.” (This teacher would be considered highly qualified if the teacher meets full WV certification requirements in the specific area of exceptionality in special education as outlined in WV Board of Education Policy 5202 (Minimum Requirements for the Licensure of Professional and Paraprofessional Personnel and Advanced Salary Classifications), AND can demonstrate academic subject competence through a “high objective uniform state standard of evaluation” or HOUSSE.

    Source: West Virginia Department of Education; HQT Special Education

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE)

    HOUSSE is an optional method of documenting subject matter competency in a core academic subject(s) for a teacher in order to meet the definition of highly qualified teacher. Section I of the Teacher Evaluation Form identified in W.Va. 126CSR13 WVBE Policy 5310, Performance Evaluation of School Personnel, hereinafter Policy 5310, that addresses a teacher's knowledge of the subject has been designated as West Virginia's HOUSSE.

    A general education teacher not new to the profession and a special education teacher eligible to use HOUSSE as defined in §126-136-8.2.2.c may use a rating of "meets standards" or higher on Section I of the Teacher Evaluation Form ( Policy 5310) to document his/her subject matter competency in order to meet the definition of highly qualified teacher in that content area being evaluated that year.

    Special Education Teachers who must rely on HOUSSE to demonstrate subject matter competence may use WVBE-approved professional development for the purpose of demonstrating subject matter competence.

    Source: West Virginia Department of Education; § 126-136.4


    Wisconsin : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers Special education teachers. Special education teachers who are teaching core academic subjects must give evidence of being “highly qualified.” Special education teachers not new to the profession are highly qualified if they hold the regular license for their assignment. They qualify through the HOUSE requirement. New special education teachers will be required to take a licensing content test in the basic subjects under PI 34 and will qualify through the test requirement.

    Source: State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; http://dpi.wi.gov/esea/pdf/hqteachers.pdf

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.

  • Wyoming : NCLB Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
    Highly Qualified Teacher-Special Education (Updated July 2006)
    HQT Definition for Special Education Teachers WYOMING ELEMENTARY SPECIAL EDUCATION HOUSSE RUBRIC

    Pursuant to requirements mandated by Federal IDEA Legislation

    Years of Experience in an accredited school
    Experience must be in an elementary setting
    5 points per year - maximum 50 points

    College Level Course Work in the 4 Content Areas
    Must be Content Specific Math, Science, Social Studies and Language Arts
    Must equal 24 semester hours across the four areas
    Courses cannot have the EDU or EDEX prefix unless they are reading courses
    2 points per credit hour must equal at least 48 points. No Limit

    Activities related to the Content Area
    Service to the Content Area
    Awards, Presentations, Publications in Content Area

    5 points per activity per year with a maximum of 15 points. Last six years only.
    • Served on a committee that developed, selected or evaluated content standards
    • Served on a committee that developed, selected or evaluated content curriculum
    • Served on a committee that aligned local content standards with state standards
    • Served on a committee that developed, validated or evaluated content assessments
    • Serving on a committee must be over an extended period of time and the amount of time must be at least 15 hours
    • Attendance at regional, state or national professional conferences/seminars/ workshops
    • Using conference/seminars/workshops must include a presentation to a professional group (ie, department, faculty, regional groups)
    • In-service in content area
    • Department chair or team leader
    • Mentor teacher
    • Cooperating teacher for student teacher
    • Officer in a regional, state, or nation professional content organization
    • Content instructor at an IHE
    • Content presentations at the district level
    • Nominations for teacher of the year
    • National or state award recipient
    • Content presentations at regional, state or national professional content organization meetings
    • Content article in regional, state or national journal

    Source; Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board: Wyoming Elementary Special Education Rubric

    HOUSSE Reciprocity, HOUSSE Phase-out Plans and HOUSSE for Specific Teachers (Updated July 2006)
    Information on the HOUSSE Option for New Special Education Teachers Teaching Multiple Core Academic Subjects
  • No information found.



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