Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
New Mexico's Revised State Plan

On August 16, 2006 the U.S. Department of Education released initial peer review feedback and related information on revised comprehensive state plans for ensuring that all public elementary and secondary school students are taught by highly qualified teachers. The 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico submitted plans as required under the No Child Left Behind Act. Scored against protocols containing six requirements provided to states in March, the plans outline the bold new steps that states will take to reach the 100 percent highly qualified teacher goal by the end of the 2006-07 school year.

Nine states developed plans that were recognized by a 31 member team of experts as satisfying all six criteria. These are New Jersey, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, Louisiana, New Mexico, Kansas, Maryland and Nevada. Thirty-nine states submitted plans that partially satisfy the six components and will be required to improve these plans and address the peer concerns by Sept. 29, 2006. However, four states did not address any of the six requirements. For these four states—Hawaii, Missouri, Utah and Wisconsin—revised plans are due November 1, 2006.

ECS collected state plan information and reviewer comments directly from revised state plans and from the peer review response forms. The purpose of this tool is to organize and streamline this extensive content in order to allow states to search, review and reference successful examples of state plans. Although no information has been paraphrased, the order of some plans has been rearranged and some data and specific information has been abbreviated. All abbreviations or informational reorganizations have been given a note with an explanation and a link to the full state plan. This resource will be most useful if used in conjunction with original state plans.

Please feel free to contact Angela Baber, ababer@ecs.org, with questions, comments, or changes to this information.

To access the plans and peer review responses, visit the U.S. Department of Education site at http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2006/08/08162006a.html and click on state plans.

New Mexico
State Plans to Meet the HQT Goal Mandated by NCLB
State Plan Introduction and/or Background Introduction:
New Mexico has been seriously committed to improving both the quality and quantity of its teachers over the last six years. In 1998, the state received a federal Title II Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant that enabled the State Department of Education (SDE) and the Commission on Higher Education (CHE) to partner on strengthening the recruitment, preparation, induction, and professional development of teachers. The collaboration between the SDE and CHE was extremely productive and resulted in a number of changes including the development of a statewide mentoring program and the three-tiered teacher licensure system.

During the same time period, important reforms were taking place at the national level and in New Mexico. In 2001, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) was signed into law, bringing into sharp focus the importance of High Quality Teachers (HQT). In 2003, the New Mexico passed HB 212 – Public School Reforms Act, which blended New Mexico’s three-tiered licensure system and the federal HQT requirements into a systematic approach aimed at ensuring that every child would be taught by competent, qualified, and caring teachers. In 2003, New Mexicans also passed two important constitutional amendments in support of education reform. The first made the SDE a cabinet agency reporting to the Governor, and the SDE became the New Mexico Public Education Department (PED). The second amendment provided additional funds to support the increased salaries that were tied the three-tiered licensure system.

New Mexico’s efforts to improve teacher quality have begun to show important results. Education Week’s annual Quality Counts reports that the state has raised its grade for teacher quality from a D in 1998 to a B in 2006. New Mexico no longer faces a shortage of teachers. The number of core academic classes taught by highly qualified teachers has risen dramatically each year, and New Mexico was one of the states cited by the US Department of Education as making serious attempts to address the issues of teacher quality.

While New Mexico is pleased with its efforts over the last six years, there is clearly much more do to. The purpose of this plan is to identify the next steps the state will take in its efforts to improve New Mexico’s education system in the area of teacher quality.

In the following pages, the PED outlines how the plan is meeting each of the six requirements. The most important point, however, is that the PED has been and is committed to providing districts and schools the support needed to meet the highly qualified teacher requirements of NCLB.

Process:
In compiling this state plan, the New Mexico Public Education Department used a collaborative approach. The data contained in this report was shared with members of other divisions in an attempt to identify critical elements that transcend divisions within PED and to establish protocol for assisting schools and districts in meeting No Child Left Behind requirements.  

Revised Plan Status
  • Accepted
  •  
    Comments to Support Determination Overall, this is an excellent plan with an exemplary use of data.

    In requirement area 6, the process for developing the equity plan needs to be completed.  

    Link to Full Revised State Plan for Meeting the HQT Goal in NCLB on the U.S. Department of Education Site The State Department of Education has made the NCLB revised plans, as well as reviewer comments, available online for each state.

    New Mexico's Revised Plan

    New Mexico's Plan—Reviewer Comments 

    Revised State Plans-Requirement 1
    Requirement 1 The revised plan must provide a detailed analysis of the core academic subject classes in the State that are currently not being taught by highly qualified teachers. The analysis must, in particular, address schools that are not making adequate yearly progress and whether or not these schools have more acute needs than do other schools in attracting highly qualified teachers. The analysis must also identify the districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards, and examine whether or not there are particular hard-to-staff courses frequently taught by non-highly qualified teachers.  
    Peer Review Finding
  • Requirement 1 has been met.
  •  
    Peer Review Supporting Narrative There is an excellent disaggregation, presentation and analysis of data.  
    Requirement 1-a Does the revised plan include an analysis of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified? Is the analysis based on accurate classroom level data?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 1-a?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 1-a The following table represents a summary of the courses taught by highly qualified teachers and non-highly qualified teachers and the statewide gains (or the statewide decrease in this percent ) from the 2003-2004 school year through the 2005-2006 school year. As of the 120th day of the 2005-2006 school year, the New Mexico overall percentage of courses taught by highly qualified teachers is 89.6%. This represents a 12.1 % improvement from the 2004-2005 school year. The overall number of courses taught by non-highly qualified teachers was 10.4%. This represents a 12.1% improvement over the 2004-2005 school year.

    This analysis is based on classroom level data (in which one elementary class is counted as one class and is as accurate as possible)*.

    Total Number of Core Classes Number of Core Classes Taught by HQ Teachers Percent of Classes Taught by HQ Teachers Number of Core Classes Taught by Non-HQ Teachers Percent of Classes Taught by Non-HQ Teachers Percentage Point Improvement from Previous Year
    03-04
    04-05
    05-06
    03-04
    04-05
    05-06
    03-04
    04-05
    05-06
    03-04 04-05 05-06 03-04 04-05 05-06
    04-05
    05-06
    All Schools
    60,434
    61,610
    63,577
    40,587
    47,753
    56,970
    67.2
    77.5
    89.6
    19,847 13,857 6,607 32.8 22.5 10.4
    10.3
    12.1
    Elementary Schools
    17,197
    18,191
    17,486
    12,684
    15,172
    16,397
    73.8
    83.4
    93.8
    4,513 3,019 1,089 26.2 16.6 6.2
    9.6
    10.4
    Secondary Schools
    43,237
    43,419
    46,091
    27,903
    32,581
    40,573
    64.5
    75.0
    88.0
    15,334 10,838 5,518 35.5 25.0 12.0
    10.5
    13.0

    *Note: This information is represented with two separate tables in the full state report, but all data has been represented here.

    (page 3)  

    The following table represents a breakout of courses taught by highly qualified teachers in schools with high and low poverty designations for elementary and secondary schools. This allows for the comparison of highly qualified teacher percentages across poverty levels. Poverty data is based on free and reduced lunch statistics as reported to the Student Nutrition Bureau.

    School Type Total Number of Core Classes Number of Core Classes Taught by HQ Teachers Percent of Classes Taught by HQ Teachers
    04-05
    05-06
    04-05
    05-06
    04-05
    05-06
    All Schools
    61,610
    63,577
    47,753
    56,970
    77.5
    89.6
    Elementary Level
    High-Poverty Schools
    3,404
    4,779
    2,854
    4,453
    83.8
    93.2
    Low-Poverty Schools
    4,485
    3,789
    3,731
    3,577
    83.1
    94.4
    All Elementary Schools
    18,191
    17,486
    15,172
    16,397
    83.4
    93.8
    Secondary Level
    High-Poverty Schools
    12,517
    4,709
    9,351
    3,947
    74.7
    83.8
    Low-Poverty Schools
    9,837
    21,965
    7,552
    19,529
    76.7
    88.9
    All Secondary Schools
    43,419
    46,091
    32,581
    40,573
    75.0
    88.0

    Summary: This data demonstrates consistent gains in the percentages of highly qualified teachers in the state of New Mexico. In looking at the highly qualified teacher percentages across poverty levels, there are slight differences between high and low poverty schools in the highly qualified teacher percentages at the elementary level. In low poverty elementary schools, the highly qualified teacher percent is 94.4% compared to 93.8% in high poverty schools. This difference increases slightly at the secondary level with 83.8% highly qualified 3 New Mexico Title II State Plan teachers in high poverty schools compared to 88.9% highly qualified teachers in low poverty schools; both of these are lower than the overall state average of 89.6%.

    (page 3) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 1-a See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 1-b Does the analysis focus on the staffing needs of school that are not making AYP? Do these schools have high percentages of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 1-b?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 1-b Summary:
    In looking at the overall percentages of highly qualified teachers in schools that did and did not meet AYP, in schools that did not make AYP, 80% of the courses were taught by highly qualified teachers. In schools that did make AYP, 79.6% of the courses were taught by highly qualified teachers. When this data is broken down into elementary, middle school and high school, only slight differences can be noted at the elementary level. For elementary schools that did not meet AYP, 83.1% of courses were taught by highly qualified teachers; this compares to 84.2% of courses taught by highly qualified teachers in elementary schools that did meet AYP. This represents a 1.1% difference between the two groups. This same trend does not continue through in the charter school data; with all categories in the AYP not met with higher percentages of courses taught by highly qualified teachers than in the AYP met group.

    When this data is compared to the 2004-2005 state average for percentage of courses taught by highly qualified teachers, or 77.5%, some discrepancies become more obvious. When middle schools are looked at as a subgroup, they consistently fall below this average in public and charters that did and did not meet AYP. Some of this can be attributed to the fact that middle school teachers in New Mexico can hold either a K-8 license, or a 7-12 secondary license. Traditionally, New Mexico chose to allow middle school teachers hold a K-8 license for several reasons. One was the philosophical belief that these teachers would have more training in how to address the developmental needs of middle school students. The other was a pragmatic approach addressing the state’s many rural districts need to hire teachers with K-8 licenses because of the flexibility they had in being assigned to different grade levels depending on the enrollment needs of small districts. The approach in NCLB is that HQT middle school teachers have a content background similar to high school teachers. New Mexico is currently working on ensuring that current and future middle school teachers do meet the HQT requirement of NCLB.

    Additionally, when the data is broken down by schools with different NCLB designations, schools in Corrective Action with Delay (CA-Delay) and schools in School Improvement I with delay (SI-I Delay), both display percentages much lower than the 77.5% average statewide. On the contrary, the Restructuring I with Delay (RI-Delay) subgroup shows that 93.1% of the core courses were taught by highly qualified staff. This is significantly higher than the state average. All of these groups represent relatively small numbers (N= 2 and N=7 and N=3, respectively). When more time allows, these groups could be examined in a more in-depth study and help us develop a more comprehensive understanding of the staffing issues and needs for these schools.

    In addition, schools with designations of School Improvement I and II, Corrective Action, Restructuring I, and Restructuring II must pursue the hiring of highly qualified teachers in level 2 and 3 licensure*. Restructuring I and II schools must have the same or exceed the percentage of highly qualified teachers staffed at their schools compared to the district average of other schools. The 2004-2005 data shown above is the first year that this requirement was in place. As we continue to track this over time more information may be revealed. *The state of New Mexico is about to enter the third year of implementing its three tiered teacher licensure system. This system requires teachers to demonstrate highly effective teaching through the state’s nine teacher competencies. Teachers advance in licensure level upon the successful completion of a professional development dossier (PDD), which provides evidence of meeting the teaching competencies. (See Appendix A for additional information regarding this.)

    Note: See full state plan, pages 4-8, for graphical representation of this information.

    (pages 4-8) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 1-b See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 1-c Does the analysis identify particular groups of teachers to which the State's plan must pay particular attention, such as special education teachers, mathematics or science teachers, or multi-subject teachers in rural schools? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 1-c?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 1-c At this time, this information, with respect to “groups of teachers,” is difficult to extract from the collected data. The New Mexico Public Education Department is implementing a new data collection system, STARS (Student Teacher Accountability Reporting System), which will allow us to more effectively track this field in the future.

    In looking at the analysis of courses taught by non-highly qualified teachers, however, some of this information is revealed. For example, we see that especially at the secondary level higher numbers of math and science classes are taught by non-highly qualified teachers. This indicates that there is a need in the state to attract and retain highly qualified math and science teachers. We also know, from our conversations with staff from rural LEAs and other PED divisions, that there is a continued need to attract highly qualified, multi-subject secondary and special education teachers to these rural areas.

    (page 9) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 1-c See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 1-d Does the analysis identify districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 1-d?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 1-d See Appendices B, C and D. These appendices identify districts and schools around the state and their standing in terms of highly qualified teacher percentages.

    Summary:
    Appendices B, C and D represent the 120th day data from the 2005-2006 school year as reported to PED through the Accountability Data System (ADS). Forty-five of the eighty-nine school districts in New Mexico are classified as rural districts and due to rural flexibility have until June 30, 2007 to meet the highly qualified deadline. These rural districts are included in the statewide summaries and represent 10 of 12 of the districts with the lowest percentages of highly qualified teachers. These districts will continue to be monitored electronically throughout the 2006-2007 school year and will be included in the comprehensive monitoring plan as indicated.

    (page 9) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 1-d See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 1-e Does the analysis identify particular courses that are often taught by non-highly qualified teachers?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 1-e?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 1-e The following tables represent an analysis of particular courses that are often taught by non-highly qualified teachers:

    Top Ten Courses in Elementary Public Schools

    NCLB Core Academic Courses New Mexico Courses Total Number Classes Taught By Non HQT Percentage
    Self-Contained Elementary Classes Incorporating Math, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, and Fine Arts *1st Grade Class 2255 424 19%
    *2nd Grade Class 2261 418 18%
    *3rd Grade Class 2303 411 18%
    *Kindergarten Class 2051 365 18%
    *4th Grade Class 2315 398 17%
    *6th Grade Class 637 105 16%
    *5th Grade Class 2259 372 16%
    Language Arts English as a Second Language (ESL, K-1) 1840 298 16%
    Note: This is an abbreviated table. See the full report, pages 10-11 for complete table information.

    Top Twenty Courses in Secondary Public Schools

    NCLB Core Academic Courses New Mexico Courses Total Number Classes Taught By Non HQT Percentage
    Math Pre-Algebra (Grades 5-8 or HS Elective) 482 187 39%
    Science Integrated (General) Science (5-8) 1209 556 46%
    Reading Title I Reading (Grades K - 12) 94 49 52%
    Note: This is an abbreviated table. See the full report, pages 10-11 for complete table information.

    Summary:
    The data shown in the tables above represents an analysis of the top courses taught by non-highly qualified teachers. This information is displayed as reported by districts to the New Mexico PED through ADS, and is shown by New Mexico course codes. For example, in looking at the second table, “Top Twenty Courses in Secondary Public Schools,” the first line indicates that 39% of Pre-Algebra (Grades 5-8 or High School Elective) is taught by non-highly qualified teachers. This is one of several possible pre-algebra course codes that districts could use; and, the others did not show up as being in the “Top Twenty” in this analysis. Because this is historical data, we do not have the ability at this time to make queries that would reflect all pre-algebra, algebra or math.

    At the elementary level, most core courses are taught in self-contained classrooms; therefore, the analysis shows a breakdown of classes taught by non-highly qualified teachers by grade level. Furthermore, the individual courses of Language Arts (English as a Second Language (ESL, K-1)) , Reading (Title I Reading (Grades K - 12)), and Fine Arts (Elementary Visual Arts (Grades K - 8)) have been identified as among the top ten elementary courses taught by non-highly qualified teachers.

    At the secondary level, the data was broken down by the New Mexico course codes. This allows us to look not only at the NCLB description (i.e. “Math” or “Science”), but to look at the level of class being taught by a not highly qualified teacher (i.e. introductory, advanced). Math has the highest number of classes being taught by not highly qualified teachers. Seven of the top twenty courses on this list are Math. Language Arts follows with five and Science with three courses represented. Of the courses in the top twenty, reading courses had the highest percentage of being taught by not highly qualified teachers, with 75.9% being taught by not highly qualified teachers.

    While this data provides meaningful information, it is important to point out that each section taught by an individual teacher counts as one course. Therefore, one teacher may teach multiple sections of an individual course and be counted multiple times as not established. As we continue to refine our data collection needs, we will need to take this into account so that we can extract more meaningful results.  

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 1-e See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Revised State Plans-Requirement 2
    Requirement 2 The revised plan must provide information on HQT status in each LEA and the steps the SEA will take to ensure that each LEA has plans in place to assist teachers who are not highly qualified to attain HQT status as quickly as possible.  
    Peer Review Finding
  • Requirement 2 has been met.
  •  
    Peer Review Supporting Narrative This state uses data to guide an improvement strategy that drills down to the district, school, class and individual teacher. This is an exemplary approach.

    The links between the SEA and the LEAs are clear in terms of expectations, milestones, communication and timelines. 

    Requirement 2-a Does the plan identify LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives for HQT?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 2-a?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 2-a See Appendices E, F and G. Appendices E, F and G identify the status of all schools in meeting their annual measurable objectives for HQT.

    Summary:
    The New Mexico Public Education Department has provided information regarding the performance of each school in relation to their annual measurable objectives. The information is provided at the school level which enables us to provide specific targeted assistance as needed. 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 2-a See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 2-b Does the plan include specific steps that will be taken by LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 2-b?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 2-b The diagram on page 13 of New Mexico's full state plan illustrates the continuous improvement model used by the New Mexico PED in working with LEAs, and the specific steps that will be taken by LEAs with regard to their highly qualified teacher percentages.

    Summary:
    The diagram above describes the rigorous consolidated application approval process used by the department. During the initial application review process, highly qualified teacher data is examined. For districts that have not yet met the 100% highly qualified goal, consultants look for evidence that plans are in place to assist teachers in becoming highly qualified.

    Districts are informed during the budget review process that in districts with high numbers of teachers that are not highly qualified, they may be required to set aside funds for this purpose. All districts that have not yet met the 100% goal are required to submit individual plans for each teacher that is not yet established as highly qualified by the 40th day of the 2006-2007 school year. These plans will be reviewed during on-site monitoring visits to districts. In addition, we have the ability to electronically monitor the status of each teacher on an on-going basis through ADS.

    See Appendix H (Email sent to EPSS coordinators with message regarding application approval process)

    (pages 13-14) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 2-b See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 2-c Does the plan delineate specific steps the SEA will take to ensure that all LEAs have plans in place to assist all non-HQ teachers to become HQ as quickly as possible?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 2-c?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 2-c The New Mexico Public Education Department is requiring new action from all LEAs to ensure that they have plans in place to assist all non-HQ teachers to become HQ as quickly as possible. As of the 40th day of the 2006-2007 school year, any teacher that is not yet established as HQ must have a written plan in place with specific steps and actions that they will take to become HQ. The plan must be signed by the teacher, principal and district superintendent and will be reviewed quarterly until the plan is completed. These plans will be monitored during on-site monitoring during the 2006-2007 school year and electronically through ADS.

    See Appendix I and J. (Letter to districts regarding this requirement and template for individual plan)

    (page 14) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 2-c See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Revised State Plans-Requirement 3
    Requirement 3 The revised plan must include information on the technical assistance, programs, and services that the SEA will offer to assist LEAs in successfully completing their HQT plans, particularly where large groups of teachers are not highly qualified, and the resources the LEAs will use to meet their HQT goals. The revised plan must include information on the technical assistance, programs, and services that the SEA will offer to assist LEAs in successfully completing their HQT plans, particularly where large groups of teachers are not highly qualified, and the resources the LEAs will use to meet their HQT goals.  
    Peer Review Finding
  • Requirement 3 has been met.
  •  
    Peer Review Comments to Support Determination This section meets the letter of the requirements more than the spirit of the requirements. How will the steps be taken? What are the deliverables, within what timelines and what skill sets will be developed? How will quality be ensured? How will success be measured?

    New Mexico states that “Title I and Title II funds will be used to support regional trainings and monitoring.” Federal funds can easily be squandered. How will the funding support which specific actions and strategies, with what intended and evaluated impact?  

    Requirement 3-a Does the plan include a description of the technical assistance the SEA will provide to assist LEAs in successfully carrying out their HQT plans?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 3-a?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 3-a LEAs will receive technical assistance to assist them in successfully carrying out their HQT plans through the following routes:

    New Mexico Transition to Teaching (T2T) Provide HQ staff to hard to staff districts. New Mexico’s Transition to Teaching program has identified many high need districts. One requirement of the program is the T2T candidate’s commitment to teach in one of these districts for three years. All T2T candidates are highly qualified prior to entering the classroom.

    Focused TA at Ed. Quality Conference Each year, the Educator Quality Division of the New Mexico PED hosts a conference surrounding the issue of Educator Quality. During this conference, focused, one-on-one technical assistance will be available. Districts will sign-up for a time slot and be able to meet with staff that will provide them with the technical assistance needed to carry out their plans.

    Leadership Academy Each year, the Educator Quality Division of the New Mexico PED hosts two conferences surrounding the issues of leadership. During these conferences, focused, one-on-one technical assistance will be available. Districts will sign-up for a time slot and be able to meet with staff that will provide them with the technical assistance needed to carry out their plans.

    Fall Monitoring for non-rural districts anyone who has not met AMO Non-rural districts that have not met their AMOs will be monitored in the fall of the 2006-2007 school year by New Mexico PED staff. The purpose of the visits will be to provide technical assistance and support in meeting the HQ goals. During the visit, individual plans for establishing highly qualified status will be examined. TA will be available to individual teachers, principals and district staff to assist them in meeting the HQ goals.

    Spring Monitoring for rural districts Rural districts that have not met their AMOs will be monitored after the 80th day, but before the 120th day of the 2006-2007 school year by New Mexico PED staff.

    www.TeachNM.org Information is available on the New Mexico Public Education Department Educator Quality Division’s website regarding the routes available for becoming highly qualified and provides districts with the most accurate and current information. In addition, information regarding all aspects of teaching in New Mexico is addressed on this site. If a person has questions, they can email the webmaster, which is an Educator Quality staff member, and will receive prompt attention.

    Through a coordinated effort with Title I, technical assistance will be provided to districts through on-site monitoring visits and regional trainings.

    In addition to the technical assistance described above, individuals are able to contact the Educator Quality Division directly for assistance. The Educator Quality Division has put a strong emphasis on customer service. Staff members can be reached by phone or email and have a target of responding within 24 hours.

    (pages 14-15) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 3-a See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 3-b Does the plan indicate that the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP will be given high priority?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 3-b?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 3-b

    Appendix K is the New Mexico Public Education Department School Improvement Framework. This framework includes prevention and intervention measures to ensure all districts and schools are supported with technical assistance and funding to support mandates. It includes a description of required professional development and staffing requirements for schools that are not making AYP.

    In addition, Title I requires a 10% set aside for schools that are not making AYP. This is used to address areas where school did not meet AYP. Districts are asked to provide a description of how these funds will be used as a part of the consolidated application process.

    These descriptions are reviewed by Title I staff. We are currently developing an improved web-based application which will allow for more detailed descriptions of the programs supported by these funds, as well as the ability to better monitor the use of these funds.

    (page 15-16) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 3-b See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 3-c Does the plan include a description of programs and services the SEA will provide to assist teachers and LEAs in successfully meeting HQT goals?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 3-c?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 3-c

    As we examine the needs of LEAs in successfully meeting HQT goals, we understand the continued need for training to assist LEAs in the reporting requirements associated with this NCLB requirement. The following represent the collaborative efforts that will be implemented for the 2006-2007 school year:

    In collaboration with Title I staff, training will be provided prior to 40th day to assist LEAs in reporting requirements through STARS, our new data reporting system. There will also be a series of regional trainings related to Title I and HQT issues, which focus on specifics. (i.e. Time reporting and HQT for HR and ADS personnel, Parent Involvement and Parent Notification requirement, etc.)

    The following organizations and state educational associates offer services to teachers, principals and other district staff in coordination with the PED:

    New Mexico American Federation of Teachers (NMAFT) / New Mexico National Education Association (NMNEA)
    Both the Albuquerque Federation of Teachers and the New Mexico National Education Association have collaborated extensively with the Educator Quality Division in the development and implementation of the Three Tiered Teacher Licensure System and the Highly Qualified Teacher requirement. Both organizations provide technical assistance to their members regarding these education reform initiatives

    Regional Education Cooperatives (REC)
    The nine Regional Education Cooperatives are geographically located throughout New Mexico. As such, they provide district/school on-site professional development supporting the implementation of the Three Tiered Teacher Licensure System and the Highly Qualified Teacher requirement. The RECs have a successful history in providing professional development services for districts throughout New Mexico. The implementation of these two education reform initiative has benefited significantly by the powerful relationships that exist between district staff and REC staff.

    Regional Educational Technology Assistance (RETA)
    The Regional Education Technology Assistance organization is a statewide professional development provider focusing on improving the technology skills of educators. The RETA program has embraced the implementation of the Three Tiered Teacher Licensure System and the Highly Qualified Teacher requirement as one of its focus areas.

    Re: Learning
    The Re: Learning program has a successful history as a statewide professional development provider. This program focuses on supporting school building principals regarding the implementation of the Three Tiered Teacher Licensure System and the Highly Qualified Teacher requirement. Each year the program focuses on various aspects of these initiatives from the prospective of the administrator’s needs.

    Teachnm.org
    The Educator Quality Division has created this website to provide a virtual professional development resource supporting several educator quality issues. This site serves as the repository for all our information regarding the Three Tiered Teacher Licensure System and the Highly Qualified Teacher requirement. The site is evolving and providing new information as it becomes available.

    Statewide PD calendar
    The Educator Quality Division is currently developing a virtual statewide professional development calendar, which will reside on the www.teachnm.org site. The calendar will help educators throughout New Mexico become aware of the wealth of professional development activities that exist, including support for the HQT requirement.

    Northern Network
    The Northern Network organization focuses on the development of highly effective Mathematics and Science teachers. As such, this program is supporting the induction and retention of highly effective educators in these two core content areas.

    Golden Apple
    The Golden Apple Foundation of New Mexico has developed an extensive and comprehensive beginning teacher mentorship program. As such, the program supports the development an retention of highly effective teachers and master level mentors.

    Wallace Grant
    The Wallace Foundation has awarded the New Mexico Office of Education Accountability a three year, $3.6 million grant aimed at helping educational leaders use accountability data to improve student success. The Wallace grant will focus on data related to student achievement, teacher quality, and financial resources.

    Helping educational leaders use accountability data to support student success is central to current education reform efforts in New Mexico and across the country. State-level policy makers; superintendents, principals, teachers, board members; parents; business and community leaders; and leaders from support agencies and organizations must be able to use data to advocate for students, provide instruction and support, monitor progress, and marshal limited resources.

    The grant will be used to:

    • Identify and remove the constraints that policy makers, superintendents, principals, and other educational leaders face in using accountability data effectively.
    • Help the OEA identify data tools, and other best practices in accountability data use and bring those lessons to New Mexico.
    • Support the PED’s efforts to train leaders and other “end-users” in using the data warehouse.
    • Support the PED’s efforts to implement the Professional Development Framework and focus on helping principals use student achievement data and teacher quality data to make improvements in schools.
    • Develop and implement support networks for principals and other educational leaders in order to ensure that they have the training, tools, and resources they need to use accountability data effectively.
    • Support the New Mexico Educational Leadership Action Network (NM ELAN) which will serve to guide the SAELP II project over the next three years.

    (pages 16-18) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 3-c See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 3-d Does the plan specifically address the needs of any subgroups of teachers identified in Requirement 1?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 3-d?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 3-d One of the subgroups identified in Requirement 1 was math teachers. In the 2006-2007 school year, the Priority Schools Bureau is offering Teacher Academies in math instruction. The PED has also created a new Math and Science Bureau which will allow us to provide focused assistance in these core academic areas.

    Furthermore, with the implementation of STARS, we will be better able to assess the needs of specific subgroups and provide targeted assistance as required. 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 3-d See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 3-e Does the plan include a description of how the State will use its available funds (e.g., Title I, Part A; Title II, Part A, including the portion that goes to the State agency for higher education; other Federal and State funds,as appropriate) to address the needs of teachers who are not highly qualified?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 3-e?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 3-e The Educator Quality Division will monitor the HQT status of all LEAs in collaboration with the Priority Schools Bureau and Title I. Working with Title I and the New Mexico Higher Education Department, we will provide targeted support to districts so that they have training and professional development where needed.

    Title I and Title II funds will be used to support regional trainings and monitoring. Some of this support will be provided by the Regional Educational Cooperatives (REC) throughout the state. Title I and II will use available funds to support the work of these organizations. 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 3-e See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 3-f Does the plan for the use of available funds indicate that priority will be given to the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 3-f?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 3-f Several programs are currently in place that address the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP. The state of New Mexico offers the following professional development opportunities through its Priority Schools Bureau:
    • Professional development institute that covers differentiated instruction for elementary, middle and high school teachers.
    • Classroom teacher mentor program in Schools in Need of Improvement (SINOI) with side by side instructors with teachers identified by principals.
    • Differentiated classroom instruction – using NCLB Title I funding in rural districts first.
    • Regional leadership trainings with Continuous improvement models- ongoing
    • Extended school day training
    • Baldrige training (Continuous Improvement Model Training) to 100 Priority schools individual trainings this year
    • Teacher Academies which focus on math instruction.

    Additional Professional Development Opportunities are offered through the following bureaus:

    Special Education Bureau

    • New Special Education Directors within NM- 3 day academy to address all requirements that new directors will need to be aware of, including HQT issues for Special Education teachers
    • Positive Behavior Support Training- six 2 day trainings throughout the year to look at this form of behavior management within school setting. In addition, training will disaggregate data on long-term suspensions and expulsions of children with disabilities by race and ethnicity
    • Tri-Annual meetings with all Special Education stakeholders
    • Collaborative planning and Co-Teaching trainings. PD on Least Restrictive Environment and other areas of planning for teachers.

    Bilingual Education Bureau

    • Currently, there are 60 districts (out of 89) that are involved in state Bilingual Program
    • Provides PD directly to teachers, best practices for first and second language acquisition, differentiated learning strategies, and curriculum development
    • Selects districts for TA and monitoring based on AYP. About 20 district per year. PD addressed more frequently within the context of monitoring.
    • Bilingual education law of 2004, Bilingual Education Regulation of 2005, Bilingual application, have assurances that teachers must be highly qualified and endorsed, and receive Professional Development.
    • Programs are working well; districts are more aware and responsive to hire highly qualified teachers or current teachers to be on a growth plan; and fewer substandard licenses are issued based on need for bilingual endorsement.
    • New Mexico has a Memorandum of Understanding with Mexico and Spain to recruit HQT, who must be proficient in Spanish and English to serve in bilingual programs.
    Finally, Appendix K is the New Mexico Public Education Department School Improvement Framework. This framework includes prevention and intervention measures to ensure all districts and schools are supported with technical assistance and funding to support mandates. Included in the framework are:
    • Regional training sessions for all district administrators. These trainings will focus on data analysis and, with the support from the Office of Educational Accountability, will provide district leaders with a deeper understanding of the HQT requirements
    • EPSS Technical Assistance Conference
    • Required Professional Development that is monitored
    • Parent and Community Involvement.

    (pages 18-20) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 3-f See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Revised State Plans-Requirement 4
    Requirement 4 The revised plan must describe how the SEA will work with LEAs that fail to reach the 100% HQT goal by the end of the 2006-07 school year. 
    Peer Review Finding
  • Requirement 4 has been met.
  •  
    Peer Review Supporting Narrative New Mexico provides a plan for this requirement, but it could be strengthened by discussing how the TA will play out in a district and how the state will make sure that the TA is having an impact.

    The TA/corrective action indicates that “the LEA will be required to develop an improvement plan.” A lot can break down from this point onward. The state will need to be vigilant in addressing the problem of a lack of implementation know-how on the part of the LEAs.

    The SEA is doing a good job of providing data on an ongoing basis to the LEAs on the progress of the districts in meeting annual measurable objectives.  

    Requirement 4-a Does the plan indicate how the SEA will monitor LEA compliance with the LEAs' HQT plans described in Requirement 2 and hold LEAs accountable for fulfilling their plans?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 4-a?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 4-a Educator Quality Division staff has developed a district monitoring model that incorporates both electronic monitoring and on-site monitoring. During their on-site visit to New Mexico, the USDE commended New Mexico for having an innovative and dynamic electronic monitoring process. The electronic monitoring tracks districts’ success in meeting the program’s key performance indicators: HQT, educational assistants as paraprofessionals, and educators receiving high quality professional development. Districts are provided with both summary reports, a district-level report regarding these indicators, and detail reports that track individual educators relative to the performance indicators. The on-site monitoring protocol mirrors the model used by the USDE during their on-site visit to New Mexico. The protocol incorporates key Title II, Part A critical elements, both fiscal and programmatic in nature. This year Educator Quality Division staff visited 14 districts using this protocol. These visits monitored compliance and provided technical assistance. Educator Quality staff, working with district staff, reviewed individual teacher files and transcripts. The result of these reviews either established a teacher’s HQT status, or initiated an individual professional development plan. Lastly, technical assistance was provided to help districts assign their teachers appropriately within their licensure/certification areas and, in doing so, eliminate out-of-field teaching.

    These same methods will be utilized in the 2006-2007 school year with the addition of critical elements that address the individual plans for establishing highly qualified status. EQ will be working with Title I to establish a collaborative monitoring process to increase our monitoring capabilities. A training schedule will be developed to prepare all staff in HQT issues. A peer monitoring program modeled after the Title I monitoring protocol will be established as a professional development opportunity.

    (page 20) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 4-a See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 4-b Does the plan show how technical assistance from the SEA to help LEAs meet the 100 percent HQT goal will be targeted toward LEAs and schools that are not making AYP? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 4-b?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 4-b Currently, EPSS (Educational Plans for Student Success) coordinators go on-site to assist schools in need of improvement by providing technical assistance and support in establishing goals. The current protocol, or the Diagnostic Assessment Report (DAR), is currently being revised so that as the coordinators are on-site, they will be provided with the tools to assist schools with understanding the HQT requirements. This ensures that each school identified as a priority school receives one-on-one technical assistance and support as needed.

    In addition, each coordinator is assigned to work with an individual district in establishing educational goals. As a part of this process, districts complete District Semester Progress Reports for the first and second semester of each school year. These reports must detail the interventions that will be taken for schools in need of improvement. Again, as a part of our collaborative efforts, the protocol for these reports is being revised so that it includes an appropriate assessment of the highly qualified needs of the schools and district.

    (pages 20-21) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 4-b See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 4-c Does the plan describe how the SEA will monitor whether LEAs attain 100 percent HQT in each LEA and school:
    • in the percentage of highly qualified teachers at each LEA and school; and
    • in the percentage of teachers who are receiving high-quality professional development to enable such teachers to become highly qualified and successful classroom teachers? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 4-c?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 4-c ...in the percentage of highly qualified teachers at each LEA and school; and

    The New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) engages in continual electronic monitoring of districts and individual schools through the Accountability Data System (ADS). Districts submit data regarding the qualifications of their teacher to PED through this system. PED prepares reports for each district at the 40th, 80th and 120th day of each school year. These reports inform the district of their highly qualified teacher percentages at each school site and their performance against the annual measurable objectives.

    ...in the percentage of teachers who are receiving high-quality professional development to enable such teachers to become highly qualified and successful classroom teachers?

    The New Mexico Public Education Department is implementing a new Student Teacher Accountability Reporting System (STARS) which will allow for the improved tracking of the percentages of teachers who are receiving high-quality professional development to enable such teachers to become highly qualified and successful classroom teachers. Through STARS the SEA will be able to electronically monitor the percentage of teachers receiving high quality professional development.

    (page 21) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 4-c See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 4-d Consistent with ESEA §2141, does the plan include technical assistance or corrective actions that the SEA will apply if LEAs fail to meet HQT and AYP goals?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 4-d?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 4-d Consistent with ESEA §2141, the New Mexico Public Education Department has collected first year data for whether or not schools have met annual measurable objectives and will continue to collect and monitor the status of this. If an LEA with a large number of schools that fail to make progress toward meeting its AMOs at the end of two consecutive years, the LEA will be required to develop an improvement plan that will enable it to meet such objectives and that directly addresses the issues that prevented it from meeting its objectives.

    (page 21) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 4-d See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Revised State Plans-Requirement 5
    Requirement 5 The revised plan must explain how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for teachers not new to the profession who were hired prior to the end of the 2005-06 school year, and how the SEA will discontinue the use of HOUSSE procedures for teachers hired after the end of the 2005-06 school year (except for the situations described below). 
    Peer Review Finding
  • Requirement 5 has been met.
  •  
    Peer Review Supporting Narrative While New Mexico provided some information on this requirement, there needs to be a greater elaboration on how the state will proceed in this area.  
    Requirement 5-a Does the plan describe how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired before the end of the 2005-06 school year?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 5-a?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 5-a As a part of the New Mexico PED’s comprehensive monitoring plan for the 2006-2007 school year, technical assistance will be provided to LEAs to assist them in completing the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired before the end of the 2005-2006 school year.

    (page 22) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 5-a See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 5-b Does the plan describe how the State will limit the use of HOUSSE after the end of the 2005-06 school year to the following situations:
    • Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools who, if HQ in one subject at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within three years of the date of hire; or
    • Multi-subject special education teachers who are new to the profession, if HQ in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire. 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 5-b?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 5-b Pending final instructions from USDE, PED anticipates amending 6.69.4 NMAC (New Mexico Administrative Code) and other school personnel rules to close the HOUSSE process on June 30, 2007, except as provided in federal statute and USDE guidance for new-to-the-profession special education teachers and newly hired teachers in rural school districts.

    (page 22) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 5-b See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Revised State Plans-Requirement 6
    Requirement 6 The revised plan must include a copy of the State's written "equity plan" for ensuring that poor or minority children are not taught by inexperienced unqualified, or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children. 
    Peer Review Finding
  • Requirement 6 has been partially met.
  •  
    Peer Review Supporting Narrative The SEA states explicitly that it is in the process of developing the equity plan. It has many pieces in place to move forward in this area: the inclusion of diverse stakeholders in the plan’s development, the Title II monitoring tool, the 3-tiered teacher licensure system and STARS (a lot is riding on STARS). That said, according to this revised plan, the equity plan has not yet been developed in full.

    When this work takes place, the strategies presented in the revised state plan need to be clearly tied to the inequities in teacher assignment.  

    Requirement 6-a Does the revised plan include a written equity plan? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 6-a?
  • No
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 6-a In order to fully address the requirements of a written equity plan for ensuring that poor or minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children, the New Mexico Public Education Department is bringing together stakeholders from across the state to collaborate on the development of this plan. This group, which is in the development phase, may include teachers, principals, superintendents, union representatives, attorneys, tribal leaders, university staff, parents/PTA representatives, Office of Education Accountability staff, New Mexico Higher Education Department staff, and members of the Coalition of School Administrators. We believe that this requirement must include the perspectives of these groups and individuals so that it adequately addresses this issue.

    (page 22) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 6-a See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 6-b Does the plan identify where inequities in teacher assignment exist?  
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 6-b?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 6-b The New Mexico PED currently collects data that reflects teacher levels of licensure and education, years of experience and salary. As we move into the STARS system, we are examining how our data collection can be broadened to accurately measure where inequities in teacher assignment may exist and highly effective teaching practices. 
    Peer Review Response to Requirement 6-b See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 6-c Does the plan delineate specific strategies for addressing inequities in teacher assignment? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 6-c?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 6-c

    The state of New Mexico currently has several programs in place that address the need for increasing the supply of highly qualified teachers.

    Foremost among these is the continued implementation of the Three Tier Teacher Licensure System. This innovative licensure system requires that teachers demonstrate highly effective teaching practices. High quality education in New Mexico depends on attracting and keeping excellent teachers. The new 3-Tier Licensure System, established by the state, ensures teacher quality through accountability and support. This system encourages good teachers to keep teaching in New Mexico. The new system links teachers’ licensure levels and salaries to the work teachers accomplish in the classroom, and it encourages and supports ongoing professional development in the nine teaching competency areas established by the State of New Mexico.

    Beginning July 1, 2004, in order to advance to the next licensure level, either from Level I to Level II, or Level II to Level III-A, teachers must demonstrate how they meet increased competencies for the next licensure level by electronically submitting a Professional Development Dossier (PDD) to the Public Education Department. Templates guide them through the process. Principals and superintendents submit local annual evaluations, verifications and recommendations to the teacher’s PDD. Under the new 3-Tier Licensure System, there will be increased expectations for performance as teachers move upward through the licensure levels.

    In addition, the New Mexico Transition to Teaching program recruits second career teachers and supports them as they move through the Alternative Licensure Pathway. This program prepares highly qualified teachers for high need districts.

    No Child Left Behind Title II P-16 Improving Teacher Quality State Grant The New Mexico Higher Education Department NCLB Title II Grant funds are distributed to partnerships with programs that assist educational assistants in earning their associate of arts degrees or Bachelor of Arts degrees. This innovative program strengthens the instructional skills and content knowledge of highly qualified educators who are already in the classroom interacting with students on a daily basis. Eventually, many of the educational assistants participating in this program will become teachers in their own classrooms. Since several of the NCLB Title II programs are in rural areas, this “grow-your-own” teacher program will help maintain the supply of highly qualified teachers in difficult to staff regions.

    The Indian Education Division offers a program that recruits Native Americans into the teaching profession. This program recruits Native Americans from 23 districts and offers a stipend to individuals in the program. In addition they offer a program that assists teachers in receiving their endorsements in special education, reading and ESL.

    (page 23)

     
    Peer Review Response to Requirement 6-c See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 6-d Does the plan provide evidence for the probable success of the strategies it includes? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 6-d?
  • No
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 6-d

    STARS data collection will enable us to monitor electronically issues that are relevant to the Equity Plan. This will include information on: poverty levels, HQT, Professional Development activities, years of teaching experience, AYP results, etc. STARS will also give the user the ability to develop reports and analyses based on individual needs, using the data available in the data warehouse. This will allow the Educator Quality Division to continue to look at the data in new ways and provide meaningful feedback from strategies implemented.

    (pages 23-24)

     
    Peer Review Response to Requirement 6-d See supporting narrative for this requirement. 
    Requirement 6-e Does the plan indicate that the SEA will examine the issue of equitable teacher assignment when it monitors LEAs, and how this will be done? 
    Does the revised state plan meet requirement 6-e?
  • Yes
  •  
    Revised State Plan Addressing Requirement 6-e Effective with the 2005-2006 school year, districts were monitored with respect to the issue of equitable teacher assignment (see the full state plan, page 24, for an excerpt from the Title II monitoring tool).

    As the written plan is developed, the criteria associated with it will be included in our monitoring protocol. Furthermore, STARS will improve our electronic monitoring capabilities in all areas related to teacher quality.

    Action Steps:

    New Mexico is committed to ensuring that every child in the state will be taught by highly qualified and effective teachers. The information outlined in this plan is central to that effort.

    State Plan Below are the action steps that will be taken by the state of New Mexico in order to fulfill the requirements of this plan.

    1. Continue to evaluate the effectiveness of our data collection systems to ensure that we have the ability to collect and analyze teacher quality and AYP data as required. This will involve the continued collaboration with other PED divisions to establish commonalities and connections in data reporting requirements.
    2. Continue to collaborate with other PED divisions to establish effective monitoring and technical assistance programs that will assist LEAs and schools in meeting NCLB requirements.
    3. Work with Title I staff and outside contractors to revise the federal consolidated application process. Ensure that the new web-based application is able to connect to other data systems so that we are able to effectively monitor and track LEA progress in meeting NCLB requirements.
    4. Implement new requirements for individual plans for establishing highly qualified teacher status. Incorporate these requirements into monitoring protocol and provide technical assistance to LEAs and teachers in meeting these goals.
    5. Continue to evaluate and coordinate statewide professional development opportunities to ensure that the needs of all educators are addressed.
    6. Provide technical assistance to LEAs in completing the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired before the end of the 2005-2006 school year.
    7. Follow state protocol for amending Rule 6.69.4 to establish a closing date for the HOUSSE procedure except in the following situations:
      • Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools who, if HQ in one subject at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within three years of the date of hire; or
      • Multi-subject special education teachers who are new to the profession, if HQ in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire.
    8. Convene a statewide group to collaborate on the development of a written equity plan to ensure that poor or minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified or out-of-field teachers at higher rates that are other children.
    9. Ensure that we are able to collect data to identify where inequities in teacher assignment exist.
    10. Continue to monitor the effectiveness of programs that address the need for increasing the supply of highly qualified teachers in New Mexico, as well as pursue new and innovative programs.

    (pages 24-25) 

    Peer Review Response to Requirement 6-e See supporting narrative for this requirement. 


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