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Denver ProComp
Colorado : Denver ProComp -District Level
Program Statistics
Name and Level Denver ProComp

Denver ProComp is a program for Denver public schools.

Status Denver ProComp

ProComp is ongoing.

  • 1999-2003
    Four year pilot program started in 16 Denver schools,
  • 2001
    Joint Task Force on teacher compensation was formed,
  • 2004
    Final ProComp plan approved,
  • 2005
    Denver voters approved a $25 million mill levy to fund the compensation plan,
  • 2006
    ProComp Salary System went into effect,
  • 2006
    Nearly 1,200 educators had joined ProComp.
Program Description Denver ProComp

The ProComp system is a results-based pay program that uses multiple criteria to assess teachers’ performance. Teachers do not receive increases until they demonstrate results. A new teacher evaluation system was field-tested during the 2004-2005 school year. ProComp contains nine different avenues for increasing pay – most of which are based on objective criteria. They include meeting annual instructional objectives, working in hard-to-serve schools or hard-to-staff assignments, obtaining certification from the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, and more. Teachers set their objectives at the beginning of the year in consultation with the principal. At the end of the year, a rubric helps the teacher and principal fairly assess performance against objectives.

Other Programs Douglas County, Colorado
Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Denver ProComp

    ProComp has four components that allow teachers to build earnings through nine elements. One component, known as the Market Incentive Component, targets hard-to-staff schools and subjects.

    The purpose of the Market Incetive Component is to attract and retain teachers of demonstrated accomplishment to designated assignments and schools.

    Hard to Staff

    Teachers/specialists who work in positions that are considered difficult to fill will receive a 3% Index Bonus. Hard to Staff assignments are classified as those where the supply of licensed professionals is low and the rate of turnover is high.

    Hard to Serve

    Teachers/specialists at schools considered hard to serve will receive a 3% Index Bonus every year the school is eligible. Hard to serve schools are those with a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Denver ProComp

    ProComp has four components that allow teachers to build earnings through nine elements:

    Knowledge and Skills

    • Professional Development Unit: Teachers who complete one Professional Development Unit in their current or proposed area of assignment will receive a salary increase of 2% of the index after
      • Completing approved courses,
      • Demonstrating their skills and
      • Reflecting on the value of the knowledge for use with their students.
    • Graduate Degree/National Board Certificates: Teachers who earn graduate degrees or certificates from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards relevant to their current or proposed assignment will receive a salary increase of 9% of the index for the life of the degree or certificate.
    • Tuition: Teachers will receive reimbursement for up to $1000 for the course of their careers for tuition for coursework in their current or proposed area of assignment.

    Professional Evaluation

    • Satisfactory Evaluation: Salary increases of 3% Index for teachers who receive a satisfactory evaluation. Evaluations would be given every three years.
    • Unsatisfactory Evaluation: Delay satisfactory performance salary increase for teachers with an unsatisfactory performance rating until the teacher receives a rating of satisfactory or better.

    Student Growth

    • Annual Objectives: Teachers/specialists will set two annual objectives. Those who meet both of their annual objectives will receive a salary increase of 1% Index. Teachers who meet one objective will receive a 1% Index bonus. Teachers who do not meet either objective will receive no increase.
    • Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP): Teachers whose students exceed an agreed-upon range for one year's growth as measured by CSAP math and reading will receive a 3% sustainable increase. Teachers who fall below the lower limit of a standard range will lose their sustainable increase if they have earned on in the past.
    • Distinguished Schools: Teachers who work in schools defined as "distinguished" will receive a bonus of 2% Index. Distinguished schools will be determined annually based on 30-40 school accreditation indicators. These include outstanding results based on student growth data and factors such as school climate, attendance and graduation rates.

    Market Incentives

    • Hard to Staff: Teachers/specialists who work in positions that are considered difficult to fill will receive a 3% Index Bonus. Hard to Staff assignments are classified as those where the supply of licensed professionals is low and the rate of turnover is high.
    • Hard to Serve: Teachers/specialists at schools considered hard to serve will receive a 3% Index Bonus every year the school is eligible. Hard to serve schools are those with a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch.
    Incentives Denver ProComp

    Types of compensation include bonuses and salary increases.

    Bonuses and salary increases are based on a salary index, a dollar amount negotiated by DPS and DCTA. It is subject to routine cost of living adjustments through collective bargaining. The index for 2005-06 is $33,301.

    Incentive Recipients Denver ProComp

    Teachers and student services providers in hard-to-staff assignments or hard-to-serve schools are among the first eligible for the bonuses.

    Current teachers will be able to opt-in over the first seven years or remain in the current system. New teachers hired in 2006 will automatically join ProComp.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Denver ProComp

    Student growth objectives set collaboratively by teacher and principal apply to students in attendance 85% of the time.

    Teachers are evaluated (effective 2006-07) by the principal and a trained, independent evaluator. Well developed rubrics articulating different levels of teacher performance and a self evaluation component are used.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Denver ProComp

    The Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) was a partner in creating the 1999 Denver Public Schools (DPS) Pay for Performance Pilot, which studied the relationship between teaching, assessing growth in student learning and teacher compensation.

    A Design Team of two teachers and two administrators was charged with planning, implementing and evaluating the pilot. The compromise also called for a study which was conducted by the Community Training and Assistance Center of Boston. As a result of the initial findings of that study, DPS and DCTA decided that a new teacher compensation agreement could not be based on student objectives alone.

    In 2001, the district and the association formed the Joint Task Force on Teacher Compensation. The task force's charge was to design a new comprehensive pay system for teachers based, in part, on the insights and learnings from the Design Team managing the pilot as well as the CTAC research study.

    The Task Force was charged with developing an equitable and affordable salary system for teachers based, in part, on the academic achievement of students. It was composed of teachers, principals, central office administrators and community members selected by Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association. Their recommendations were shared with teachers and administrators in the form of draft recommendations in the Spring of 2003.

    Final recommendations were incorporated into an overall plan that was submitted to the Board of Education and members of the Denver Classroom Teachers Association in early 2004. The final plan which was named the Professional Compensation Plan for Teachers, or ProComp, was approved by the DPS Board in February and DCTA members accepted the plan in March 2004.

    Other Stakeholders Denver ProComp

    In addition to teachers and teacher unions, principals, central office administrators, community members, and legislators were all involved in the assessment of the pilot program and in the design of the Denver ProComp program.

    Program Funding
    Cost Denver ProComp

    November 2005 ballot measure for $25 million mill levy was passed by Denver voters.

    A ProComp chart that shows the new index of $33,301.00 and new payout amounts for each of the elements of the program.

    Funding Denver ProComp

    ProComp’s increased earnings for teachers are affordable because the system is based on a mill levy override that adds $25 million per year, solely for teacher compensation under ProComp. The system was implemented after Denver voters approved additional funding through a mill levy election in November 2005. This $25 million annual revenue increase is permanent and will build over time, totaling $250 million in 10 years and $750 million over 30 years.

    Importantly, proceeds from the mill levy will be placed in a trust fund governed by a board of directors that includes representatives from Denver Public Schools, DCTA and the community. Designers of ProComp projected the system costs 50 years into the future. Based on a mill levy increase, the model proves that the system is secure and sustainable. In the early years, revenues would exceed expenditures as ProComp is phased in. Like a retirement fund, any surplus money will be invested to stabilize short-term fluctuations in the cost of the system. Over time, the system will become self-sustaining as teachers retire at the top end and are replaced by newer teachers entering the district at lower salaries.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Denver ProComp

    No information found at this time.




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