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International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate (IB) offers highly motivated students the opportunity to complete a cohesive, challenging curriculum aligned with international standards. The database below is focused on state policies related to the IB Diploma Program for 11th and 12th graders.

What is International Baccalaureate? For more details on the IB Diploma Program, please refer to this summary for state policymakers or visit the IB Web site

This database includes information on:

1. States that mandate IB program offerings: Currently, no state requires all high schools to offer IB courses or programs. However, seven states–eight effective with the 2008-2009 school year–require all high schools to offer dual credit opportunities, of which IB is one option.

Why does it matter?

  • Students benefit when all students, regardless of district poverty level or expectations, are offered the opportunity to complete challenging coursework.
  • 2. States that provide financial incentives for IB courses: Seven states provide financial incentives for offering IB programs, through start-up grants to help cover the costs of implementing new IB courses/programs and/or by offering additional funds to schools or districts for students who earn a "4" or higher on IB exams.

    Why does it matter?

  • Districts and schools benefit when states provide financial resources to help cover additional equipment, materials or other costs that IB courses may incur.
  • Financial incentives can encourage more schools and districts to provide IB options.
  • Fiscal incentives based on high achievement keep the focus on learning–not just on curriculum.

    3. States that provide accountability incentives for IB programs: Ten states include IB offerings and achievement in state report cards, accountability calculations or accreditation indicators. An additional three states mandate that reports be made to the legislature or state education agency on IB offerings and/or enrollments.

    Why does it matter?
  • Students benefit when schools and districts have incentives to offer advanced coursework.
  • 4. State programs and funding for IB teacher training: Seven states provide IB-specific training and/or funds for IB teachers to participate in IB professional development opportunities.

    Why does it matter?

  • Teachers (and ultimately students) benefit when states provide opportunities and financial resources to help teachers gain the knowledge and skills needed to ensure student success in IB courses.

  • 5. State subsidies for IB test fees: Nine states allocate state funds to cover IB test fees, either for low-income students or for all students. This number does not include states that have received a U.S. Department of Education grant to cover low-income students' IB exam fees.

    Why does it matter?
  • Test fees should not be an obstacle for students who want to take IB exams.

  • 6. State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores: Two states specify that earning an IB diploma or acceptable scores on IB exams satisfy one or more eligibility criteria for a state scholarship.

    Why does it matter?
  • Students and families benefit when success on challenging IB assessments results in a reduction in the cost of postsecondary education.

    7. Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems: Three states direct that postsecondary institutions play a role in offering IB courses or networking among schools. This figure does not include states in which the university role is defined only by the offering of IB teacher training.
  • Why does it matter?

  • Schools, universities and students benefit when K-12 and postsecondary partnerships facilitate the provision of IB offerings and the quality of these offerings.

    8. State support for encouraging access to IB: Six states specify that IB funding be targeted at low-income schools or schools with limited access to challenging high school curriculum options, or that provide explicit funding and/or support for pre-IB programs and teacher preparation. This does not include states that offer start-up grants for new IB courses/programs (see "financial incentives data point) or states in which IB high schools are participating in U.S. Department of Education Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) grants.

    Why does it matter?
  • Students benefit when all students, regardless of school location or demographics, have access to quality IB offerings.
  • Students benefit when mechanisms help ensure students are prepared in the earlier grades to participate in challenging IB coursework and exams during their final years of high school.

    9. State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores: Eleven state policies explictly require either four-year postsecondary institutions or all postsecondary institutions to award postsecondary credit to students who earn minimum scores on IB exams. However, most of these 11 states allow individual institutions to determine the specific courses, minimum IB exam scores, and amount of credit awarded for successful performance on IB assessments. 

    Why does it matter?
  • Students benefit when postsecondary institutions within a state set consistent standards on the amount and type of credit entering and transferring students receive by earning minimum IB exam scores.

    10. Student must take IB exam to receive course credit: Arkansas is the only state that requires students to take the IB exams to receive course credit (in this case, weighted course credit).

    Why does it matter?
  • Requiring passage helps ensure competency–both in teaching and in learning.

    Methodology: This information was collected primarily from state statutes, rules and regulations, and postsecondary governing/coordinating board policy manuals, and will be updated as new policies and programs are enacted.

    Last updated: August 20, 2007

    This database was compiled by Jennifer Dounay, project manager, ECS High School Policy Center. For questions, additions or corrections: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.

  • Alabama
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Alaska
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Arizona
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. The Options for Excellence program at Arizona State University provides IB teacher mentoring and training.
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores Yes. The state offers a tuition waiver valid at state universities for one full year following graduation from high school (renewable for up to 4 additional years based on university-determined criteria). Eligible students must meet three sets of criteria:
    (1) Complete 16 "Core Competency Courses" with at least a "B" OR earn an acceptable score on the Advanced Placement (AP) test or a "4" on the IB test for that subject area.
    (2) Meet GPA or class rank requirements.
    (3) Exceed standards on all 3 AIMS (Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards) tests OR exceed standards on 2 AIMS tests and earn at least a "3" on any two AP tests or at least a "4" on any two IB tests.
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The Options for Excellence program administered by Arizona State University seeks to increase the number of challenging curriculum options in middle and high schools in the state, as well as the number of students demonstrating achievement in such options, as measured by IB, CLEP and Advanced Placement (AP). The program serves "as a liaison between teachers, schools, and districts, and the IB, AP or ACT agencies that provide resources for rigorous school-wide curriculum and increase teacher performance."
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Teacher training: Options for Excellence Web site
    Scholarship: Arizona Department of Education Honors Endorsement/Tuition Waver Web site
    Collaboration: Options for Excellence Web site

    Arkansas
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No. However, a high school offering the IB Diploma Program is exempt from the requirement to offer at least 4 AP courses by 2008-2009.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses Yes. Schools may be awarded a one-time equipment and instructional materials grant for each IB course provided. Districts with more than one high school offering IB courses may apply for the one-time equipment grants for each high school.

    In addition, depending on the availability of funds, schools may be awarded up to $50 for each score on an IB exam equivalent to a 3 earned on an Advanced Placement exam. A school must use the funds from the IB exam awards in the school's IB program.
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. Districts must annually report by grade level, economic status and ethnicity the number of students taking IB courses.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. An IB teacher may apply for a grant of up to $650 to cover the costs of tuition, expenses and material of approved training programs. A teacher assigned to teach more than one IB course may apply for more than one teacher training stipend. Priority for grant awards will be given teachers who have not been previously trained. An IB teacher must attend the training required by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO).

    In addition, a student may receive a weighted grade in an IB course only if the IB course teacher attends the training required by the IBO.
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. State authorized to pay IB test fee in full or on pro rata basis.
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit Yes. Student must take IB exam to receive weighted course credit.
    Sources Offering mandated: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-1206
    Financial incentives: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-804; 005 15 CARR 006
    Accountability incentives: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-2006
    Teacher training: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-804; 005 15 CARR 006
    Test fees: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-804; 005 15 CARR 006
    Course credit: 005 15 CARR 006

    California
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No. While legislation authorizes the awarding of start-up grants for IB programs, these grants have never been funded or awarded.
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No. However, districts offering an IB Diploma program must annually report to the state department of education the number of students in the district enrolled in IB courses.

    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. The superintendent of public instruction annually allocates to each district, for each public high school or middle school offering an IB program, up to $25,000 to cover professional development costs and IB test fees. Grants must "be increased annually by a cost-of-living adjustment, based on the same percentage increase that is provided to the revenue limits of unified school districts with 2,501 or more units of average daily attendance."

    In addition, districts offering the IB diploma program must annually report to the state department of education the number of teachers in the district "attending training programs offered by the International Baccalaureate North America, Inc." and participating in pre-IB support programs, as well as the amount of money the district spent to provide or participate in such programs.
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. A state grant program makes available grants to school districts to cover the IB exam fees of a "eligible economically disadvantaged high school" student, defined as a student from a family whose annual household income is 200% below the federal poverty level or who is eligible for free/reduced lunch. An eligible student enrolled in an IB course may apply to the district for a grant; a student receiving a grant pays $5 of the exam fee. Statute directs the state department of education to "make every effort to obtain and allocate federal funding for the purposes of this program prior to expending any state funds."

    In addition, the superintendent of public instruction annually allocates up to $25,000 to each district, for each high school or middle school that offers an IB program. The funds must cover teacher professional development and test fees for low- and middle-income students in need of financial assistance. Grants must "be increased annually by a cost-of-living adjustment, based on the same percentage increase that is provided to the revenue limits of unified school districts with 2,501 or more units of average daily attendance."
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB

    Yes. Statute specifies that first priority for grants to support IB program start-up costs must be given high schools serving the highest percentage of low-income students. Once grants have been awarded to eligible high schools, grants must be given to eligible middle schools, "giving priority to those middle schools that have the highest percentage of pupils from low-income families and those middle schools that have been awarded affiliate status from the International Baccalaureate Organization."

    In addition, a district operating an IB program must annually report to the state department of education the number of teachers in the district participating in pre-International Baccalaureate support programs and the amount of money the district spent to participate in such programs.

    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Financial incentives: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52922; Marjorie McConnell, Education Programs Consultant, California Department of Education
    Accountability incentives: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52921
    Teacher training: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52921, 52922
    Test fees: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52244, 52922
    Encouraging access: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52921, 52922

    Colorado
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. District accreditation indicators include the percentage of students enrolled in an IB diploma program. In addition, each public high school's annual school accountability report must provide information on any IB course offerings in the school.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes, for public 4-year institutions. The amount of credit awarded and the minimum test scores required for credit to be granted is set by each governing board of public 4-year institutions. However, a minimum of 24 semester credits must be granted, unless a student has received a score less than 4 on an IB diploma exam, in which case the number of semester credits awarded must be reduced accordingly. Each governing board of a 4-year public postsecondary institution must also "identify the specific general education or elective requirements" fulfilled by the IB diploma program and must set forth the "conditions necessary to award the credits."
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Accountability incentives: COLO. REV. STAT. § 22-11-104, 22-7-605 (as amended by 2007 H.B. 1345)
    Credit for minimum scores: COLO. REV. STAT. § 23-1-113.2

    Connecticut
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Delaware
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    District of Columbia
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Florida
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses Yes. For each student enrolled in an IB course who receives a 4 or higher on the related exam, a district is calculated an additional .24 full-time equivalent (FTE) student membership. A district is also calculated a .3 FTE student membership for each student who receives an IB diploma. These values must be added to the total FTE student membership for grades 9-12 for the subsequent fiscal year. In turn, the district must award each IB classroom teacher a $50 bonus for each IB student he/she teaches who receives a 4 or higher on the IB exam, and an additional $500 bonus to each IB teacher "in a school designated with a grade of "D" or "F" who has at least one student scoring 4 or higher on the international baccalaureate examination, regardless of the number of classes taught or of the number of students scoring a 4 or higher on the" IB exam. Bonuses awarded to any teacher may not exceed $2,000 in a given school year and must be in addition to any other bonus/wages the teacher would otherwise receive.

    In addition, the merit award program for instructional staff and school-based administrators requires participating districts to administer an end-of-course assessment to measure student achievement. International Baccalaureate exams may be used for this purpose.
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No. The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement is mandated to provide Advanced Placement (AP) and other advanced course teachers of minority and underrepresented students with training and professional development in content knowledge and instructional skills. However, the partnership does not offer training specific to IB.
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. Students are exempt from paying IB test fees regardless of whether or not the student earns a passing score on the exam.
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores Yes. All students applying for a Florida Academic Scholars award must meet the general eligibility requirements for the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship and meet one of five additional criteria. One of the additional criteria pathways is the completion of an International Baccalaureate Diploma. Students who complete the IB curriculum but fail to earn the IB Diploma are still eligible provided they earn a minimum score "on the combined verbal and qualitative parts of the Scholastic Aptitude Test, the Scholastic Assessment Test, or the recentered Scholastic Assessment Test of the College Entrance Examination, or an equivalent score on the ACT Assessment Program[.]"

    In addition, a student is eligible for the Florida Medallion Scholars award if the student meets the general eligibility requirements for the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship, has completed the IB curriculum without earning the IB diploma, but has earned a minimum score on one of the previously mentioned assessments.
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. "The levels of postsecondary education shall collaborate in further developing and providing articulated programs in which students can proceed toward their educational objectives as rapidly as their circumstances permit." International Baccalaureate is one of the acceleration programs on which collaboration is mandated.
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. The state board of education must identify the minimum scores and IB exams that "will be used to grant postsecondary credit at community colleges and universities." The state department of education must determine the course(s) for which credit must be awarded for each IB exam. A maximum of 30 semester credit hours may be awarded any student for IB exam scores. "Each community college and state university must award credit for specific courses for which" students have passed an IB exam, "unless the award of credit duplicates credit already awarded."

    State board of education policy notes that each bachelor's degree program offered by a university must be designed so that at least 25% of degree requirements may be completed by one of several methods, including the IB program or a combination of IB and other acceleration mechanisms.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Financial incentives: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1011.62, 1012.225
    Teacher training: Monica Hayes, Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement
    Test fees: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.27
    Scholarship: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1009.534, 1009.535
    Collaboration: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.22
    Credit for minimum scores: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.27; FLA. ADMIN. CODE ANN. r. 6C-6.006

    Georgia
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No. However, gifted students in IB courses may be counted at the gifted weight only if certain criteria are met, including that the teacher either has a gifted endorsement OR has been trained by the International Baccalaureate Program in his/her IB subject area and has fulfilled additional training on teaching gifted students.
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Teacher training: Resource Manual for Gifted Education Services, Appendix A

    Hawaii
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Idaho
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although effective with the 2007-2008 school year, all high schools must either offer "advanced opportunities," (defined as AP courses, dual credit courses, Tech Prep, or IB programs), "or provide opportunities for students to take courses at the postsecondary campus."
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: IDAPA 08.02.03, subsections 007.01 and 106

    Illinois
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Indiana
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although each high school must offer one of the following:
    (1) Two Advanced Placement (AP) courses and corresponding exams
    (2) Dual high school/college courses that result in 6 college credits
    (3) One AP course and one dual course resulting in 3 college credits
    (4) Two IB courses and corresponding exams.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. Each district's "school corporation annual performance report" must note the number of students receiving an IB diploma.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: Indiana Department of Education High School Curriculum Verification Checklist
    Accountability incentives: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-20-8-8

    Iowa
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Kansas
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Kentucky
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although each high school is mandated to "offer a core curriculum of advanced placement, International Baccalaureate, dual enrollment, or dual credit courses, using either or both on-site instruction or electronic instruction through the Kentucky Virtual High School or other on-line alternatives."
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. A bonus point is added to the "transition to adult life calculation for each graduate who" completes an IB diploma.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB Yes. Each high school's school-based decision making council must "establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to advanced placement, International Baccalaureate, dual enrollment, and dual credit courses that recognizes that all students have the right to be academically challenged and should be encouraged to participate in these courses."
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 160.348
    Accountability incentives: 703 KY. ADMIN. REGS. 5:020
    Encouraging access: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 160.348

    Louisiana
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No, although the Plan for High School Redesign in Louisiana indicates increasing the availability of IB offerings, including through the Louisiana Virtual School, as a Level 2 implementation effort (to be "piloted based on schools' readiness and willingness to participate").
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Encouraging access: Plan for High School Redesign in Louisiana

    Maine
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Maryland
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. State data system annually reports students taking IB courses.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Accountability incentives: MD. REGS. CODE tit. 13A, § 01.04.04

    Massachusetts
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Michigan
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses Yes. In the 2006-2007 school year, the state department of education made $50,000 grants available to districts, intermediate districts, and consortia of districts/intermediate districts to help offset the costs of implementing an IB diploma program or IB middle years program. A grantee may receive a grant for up to 4 fiscal years.
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. If a district wants all of its schools to be accredited, it must submit an annual report for each school to the state board. The report must include:
    (1) The number of "college level equivalent courses" (including Advanced Placement and IB courses) offered in the school and district
    (2) The number and percentage of students enrolled in at least 1 AP or IB course during the previous school year
    (3) The number and percentage of these students who took an AP or IB exam
    (4) The number and percentage whose score on the exam was at or above the level recommended by the testing service for college credit.

    The state department of education is required to submit a report to the legislature, "aggregated for statewide and intermediate school district totals, using the information submitted by school districts."
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB Yes. 2006 legislation allocated $250,000 to award five $50,000 grants to districts, intermediate districts, and consortia of districts/intermediate districts to help offset the start-up costs of implementing an IB diploma program or IB middle years program. A grantee may receive a grant for up to 4 fiscal years. The legislation directs the department to balance the grant awards between middle years programs and diploma programs.
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Financial incentives and Encouraging access: MICH. COMP. LAWS ANN. § 388.1657a
    Accountability incentives: MICH. COMP. LAWS ANN. § 380.1204a

    Minnesota
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses

    Yes. A competitive grant program is designed to expand IB course and program offerings. Grant awards may not exceed the lesser of $85 times the number of students enrolled at the participating sites on October 1 of the previous fiscal year, or the approved supplemental expenditures set out in the grant application. Funding may be used to:
    (1) Provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, in IB programs
    (2) Further develop IB courses or programs
    (3) Improve the transition between grade levels to help students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, succeed in IB programs
    (4) Buy books and supplies
    (5) Pay course or program fees
    (6) Increase student participation and success in IB courses or programs
    (7) Expand student access to IB courses or programs through online learning
    (8) Hire appropriately licensed personnel to teach additional IB courses or programs
    (9) Engage in other activity directly related to expanding student access, participation and success in IB courses or programs, including low-income and other disadvantaged students.

    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No, although the state commissioner of education must annually report to the education committees of the legislature the number of students enrolled in IB courses in each district.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. Statute authorizes the state to "pay a portion of the tuition, room, board, and out-of-state travel costs a teacher or other interested educator incurs in participating in a training program." Teachers must apply for scholarships to participate in IB training programs. The state is also to provide support programs during the school year for IB teachers who attended the training programs and for teachers experienced in teaching IB courses. Support programs must "provide teachers with opportunities to share instructional ideas with other teachers. The state may pay the costs of participating in the support programs, including substitute teachers, if necessary, and program affiliation costs." 2007 H.F. 2245 provides that "at least $500,000 each year is for teachers to attend subject matter summer training programs and follow-up support workshops approved by the advanced placement or international baccalaureate programs." The commissioner of education must annually report to the education committees of the legislature the number of teachers in each district attending IB training programs and participating in support programs.

    State policy treats AP and IB teacher training, support programs and subsidies for exam scores the same. 2007 H.F. 2245 directs that the AP program and IB program receive 75% and 25% of the appropriation each year, respectively. "The [state] department [of education], in consultation with representatives of the advanced placement and international baccalaureate programs selected by the Advanced Placement Advisory Council and IBMN, respectively, shall determine the amounts of the expenditures each year for examination fees and training and support programs for each program."

    Funds from the competitive grant program to expand AP access may be used for teacher training to better serve students, "including low-income and other disadvantaged students," participating in IB courses or programs, or to "hire appropriately licensed personnel to teach additional" IB courses or programs.
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. The state covers the exam fees for all public and nonpublic low-income students, and to the extent appropriations are available, the exam fees of other public and nonpublic students. The 2007 appropriation also directs that the AP program and IB program must receive 75% and 25% of the appropriation, respectively, to support teacher training, teacher support programs and test fee subsidies. "The department, in consultation with representatives of the advanced placement and international baccalaureate programs selected by the Advanced Placement Advisory Council and IBMN, respectively, shall determine the amounts of the expenditures each year for examination fees and training and support programs for each program."

    The legislation also provides that any unused portion of the $500,000 annually allocated for teacher training may be used to cover exam fees.

    Funds awarded through the state's competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand AP and IB access may also be used to pay course or program fees.
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores Yes. The Achieve Scholarship offers up to $1,200 to high school graduates who completed a rigorous high school curriculum and meet various other criteria. One of the four means by which students may meet the "rigor" requirement is by completing at least two IB or Advanced Placement courses and scoring at least "4" on the IB exams or "3" on the AP exams.
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. 2007 H.F. 1063 allocates fiscal year 2008 and 2009 funds to the University of Minnesota and Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to provide "academically rigorous educational opportunities," including IB and Advanced Placement (AP) to students in remote and underserved areas where the district lacks the resources to provide such programs. Courses may be provided by high school or postsecondary staff, or via distance learning.
    State support for encouraging access to IB Yes. The statute that authorizes the state to help cover IB teacher training program costs specifies that procedures must, to the extent possible, ensure that IB "courses become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in school districts."

    In addition, the state has a competitive grant program to increase student access to IB. Eligible schools must have a three-year plan approved by the local board to either establish a new IB program or expand an existing program leading to IB authorization, or expand an existing authorized IB program. Proposals must seek to achieve one or more of the following goals:
    (1) Increase the availability of IB courses or programs
    (2) Expand the breadth of IB courses or programs available
    (3) Increase the number and diversity of students who succeed in IB courses
    (4) Increase low-income and other disadvantaged students' access to IB courses and programs
    (5) Increase the number of students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who earn college credit by completing IB courses and earning sufficient scores on related exams.

    Furthermore, 2007 H.F. 1063 allocates fiscal year 2008 and 2009 funds to the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to provide "academically rigorous educational opportunities," including IB and Advanced Placement (AP). Courses may be delivered by a high school or postsecondary instructor or via distance learning.
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No. "The colleges and universities of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system must award, and the University of Minnesota and private postsecondary institutions are encouraged to award, college credit to high school students who receive a score of ... four or higher on the international baccalaureate program examination."
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Financial incentives: MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.132
    Accountability incentives: MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.13
    Teacher training: 2007 H.F. 2245, MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.13, 120B.132
    Test fees: 2007 H.F. 2245, MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.13, 120B.132
    Scholarship: Achieve Scholarship Program Web page
    Collaboration: 2007 H.F. 1063
    Encouraging access: MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.13, 120B.132; 2007 H.F. 1063
    Credit for minimum scores: MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.13

    Mississippi
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although a high school that offers the IB Diploma Program is exempt from the requirement that beginning with the 2007-2008 school year, all high schools offer 1 AP course in each of the areas of English, math, science and social studies.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. Statute provides that a school offering the IB program may "participate in teacher training and program funding on the same basis as any high school offering advanced placement courses."
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-39; CMSR 36-000-113 (Mississippi State Board Policy Manual Code 2903)
    Teacher training: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-39

    Missouri
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. To be eligible under "the Missouri Fee Payment Program, "students must be enrolled in an approved course, plan to take the appropriate exam and have either scored proficient or advanced on the same content area section of the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) test." The department of elementary and secondary education is also required to "establish a systematic process for identification and reporting the names of students eligible for aid to pay a portion of the cost of ... IB fees; and an evaluation used to determine the effectiveness of the program as a whole and the program's impact upon participating students."
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Test fees: MO. CODE REGS. ANN. tit. 5, § 50-200.050

    Montana
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Nebraska
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Nevada
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    New Hampshire
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    New Jersey
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    New Mexico
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    New York
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources

     


    North Carolina
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes, although each institution within the University of North Carolina determines the minimum IB scores, type and amount of credit awarded.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Credit for minimum scores: Institutional Profiles 2006-2007, Appendix H

    North Dakota
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. A credit-by-exam chart outlines the credit hours and equivalent college courses for which students may receive credit for a score of 4 or higher on an IB exam.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Credit for minimum scores: North Dakota University System procedure 403.7.4 Common Credit-By-Exam Guidelines and credit-by-exam chart

    Ohio
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. Each local report card (which does not affect school or district ratings) indicates the percentage of students in the previous year who participated in IB programs.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Accountability incentives: Guide for Ohio's Report Card System, 2006-2007

    Oklahoma
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses Yes. The state board of education is authorized to award schools $100 for each score of "4" or better on an IB exam. These funds must be used to support the development of IB courses.

    A school may apply to the state department of education for a one-time $5,000 equipment and materials grant for each new IB course offered. "Additional grants may be awarded to school sites demonstrating successful implementation of the ... International Baccalaureate course for which the original equipment and materials grant was awarded. Successful implementation may be demonstrated by, but is not limited to:
    (A) The class having been reported on the Application for Accreditation Coded Class Schedule.
    (B) A student having completed the relevant ... International Baccalaureate examination.
    (C) A student having scored ... four or better on" the relevant IB exam.
    "(D) Evidence of activities to prepare growing numbers of students for the challenges offered by the ... International Baccalaureate classes."
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. Statute authorizes the state board of education to award schools subsidized training for IB courses. According to the state department of education Web site, the department trains almost 1,500 teachers and counselors annually in AP and IB instruction and provides course guidelines aligned with the state curriculum.
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. The state department of education covers a share of the IB exam fee for students who take more than one IB exam in one year, or who demonstrate financial need.
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB Yes. A school that has received a one-time $5,000 start-up equipment and materials grant may be awarded an additional grant for demonstrating successful implementation of the IB course "for which the original equipment and materials grant was awarded." One means of demonstrating successful implementation is "evidence of activities to prepare growing numbers of students for the challenges offered by the ... International Baccalaureate classes."

    A school may also apply for an IB "vertical team grant for a content area from a high school and its feeder middle school(s)." The team must include at least one representative from each grade level 7-12 in the content area.
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No, although when institutions do award postsecondary credit for IB scores, exam scores must meet or exceed the minimums recommended by the American Council on Education for national examinations, at least a four (on a seven-point scale) in the Higher Level course in the International Baccalaureate program[.]"
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Financial incentives: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.703; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:40-52-5; Catherine Dunn, Specialist in Gifted and Talented and Advanced Placement, Oklahoma Department of Education
    Teacher training: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.703; Oklahoma State Department of Education Web site
    Test fees: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.703; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:40-52-6.2
    Encouraging access: OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:40-52-5; Catherine Dunn, Specialist in Gifted and Talented and Advanced Placement, Oklahoma Department of Education
    Credit for minimum scores: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Policy Manual, Section 5, Chapter 2; Dwayne Holford, Coordinator, Academic Affairs Projects, Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

    Oregon
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although all districts must offer the Expanded Options Program, which provides opportunities for 11th- and 12th-graders to earn postsecondary credit through dual credit technical preparation programs, such as two-plus-two programs, AP and International Baccalaureate.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No, although each district must report to the state department of education the types of accelerated college credit programs offered, including IB programs. The department in turn must annually report to the Joint Boards of Education and the House and Senate committees the types of accelerated college credit programs offered in the state.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. "Each of the seven undergraduate universities in the Oregon University System gives credit-by-examination through" the IB program, though minimum scores and the amount of credit vary by institution.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: OR. REV. STAT. § 340.005 through 340.090; OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1362 through 581-022-1370
    Accountability incentives: OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1363, 581-022-1364, 581-022-1369
    Credit for minimum scores: Oregon University System College Handbook, 2006-07 (pages 77-79)

    Pennsylvania
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Puerto Rico
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Rhode Island
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    South Carolina
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. 2007 H.B. 3620 allocates funds to support Advanced Placement (AP) programs, and provides that these funds may cover $75 of an IB test fee (the same amount awarded to cover a student's AP test fee).
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. Public higher education institutions all articulate high school IB coursework for academic credit using individual institutional standards. Working within the framework of the state’s Education and Economic Development Act, a statewide study group is currently developing a common IB policy for all public institutions, which is anticipated to be implemented in 2007.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Test fees: 2007 H.B. 3620; Marc Drews, South Carolina Department of Education
    Credit for minimum scores: July 31, 2006 South Carolina Commission on Higher Education memo; Dr. R. Lynn Kelley, Acting Director of Academic Affairs & Licensing, South Carolina Commission on Higher Education

    South Dakota
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. A document on the South Dakota Board of Regents Web site outlines IB courses, their postsecondary course equivalents, and the credit to be awarded for minimum scores.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Credit for minimum scores: South Dakota Board of Regents Web site

    Tennessee
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Texas
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although all districts are required to offer students the opportunity to earn the equivalent of at least 12 semester credits in high school. IB is one of the means by which this college credit may be earned.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses Yes. Statute authorizes schools to receive a one-time $3,000 equipment grant for providing an IB course. Funds are awarded to a school based on need as determined by the commissioner. However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, the $3,000 equipment grant was last funded in the 2002-2003 fiscal biennium.

    A school may also be awarded up to $100 for each student who scores a 4 or higher on an IB exam. Equipment grants and score reward funds must be used in the manner determined by the campus team convened by the principal. However, the school must "give priority to academic enhancement purposes in using an award received under the program," and may not use the award "for any purpose related to athletics."

    The state also targets financial incentives for IB teachers. A teacher may receive a one-time $250 award for teaching an IB class for the first time. In addition, the state may deposit $50 in the teacher bonus pool for each student enrolled in the school that scores a 4 or better on an IB exam. An IB teacher may receive "a share of the teacher bonus pool, which [must] be distributed by the teacher's school in shares proportional to the number of [IB] courses taught." However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, neither the $250 award nor the teacher bonus pool share have ever been funded by the state.

    A district "is entitled to state revenue necessary to provide the district with the sum of ... an amount equal to the product of $275 multiplied by the number of students in average daily attendance in grades nine through 12 in the district." One of the ways districts may use these funds is to "implement or administer a program that encourages students to pursue advanced academic opportunities, including early college high school programs and dual credit, advanced placement, and international baccalaureate courses...." The state additionally provides districts with an annual allotment for each student identified as gifted and talented. Such funds may be used to provide IB programs.
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. One of the school and district performance indicators in the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) is participation in and performance on IB exams. This information is "disaggregated by ethnicity, sex, special education, low income status, limited English proficient status (since 2002-03), and beginning in 2003-04, at risk status (district only)."
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training Yes. An IB or pre-IB teacher may receive a subsidy of up to $450 for teacher training endorsed or sponsored by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO).
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. Students demonstrating financial need may receive a testing fee subsidy of up to $25.

    In addition, statute authorizes a student who earns a 4 or higher on an IB exam to receive up to $65 reimbursement for the testing fee. The commissioner of education is authorized to enter into agreements with the International Baccalaureate Organization "to pay for all examinations taken by eligible public school students." The state defines an "eligible student" as one taking an IB course at a public school or "who is recommended by the student's principal or teacher to take the test." However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, the $65 testing fee reimbursement has never been funded by the state.

     
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB Yes. Pre-IB teachers may receive state subsidies of up to $450 for teacher training sponsored or endorsed by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO).
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. Each public institution of higher education must adopt a policy to grant credit to students who have completed the IB diploma program. Institutions must award at least 24 semester credit hours in appropriate subject areas for completion of the IB diploma program, although an institution may grant fewer than 24 credit hours if a student earned a score below 4 on an IB exam.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.009 (as amended by 2007 H.B. 3485)
    Financial incentives: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.053, 39.114, 42.2516(b)(3), 42.156; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 74.29; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
    Accountability incentives: Academic Excellence Indicator System Web site
    Teacher training: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.053; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 74.29; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
    Test fees: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.053, 28.054; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 74.29; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
    Encouraging access: "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
    Credit for minimum scores: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 51.968

    Utah
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. According to the Utah State Board of Regents R470-9.1.3, "Credit should be granted for International Baccalaureate examinations and/or diplomas as determined by each institution." In practice, all public postsecondary institutions in the state are awarding credit to students passing IB exams; academic departments determine the amount of credit awarded and the courses for which credit is granted.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Credit for minimum scores: Utah State Board of Regents Rule R470-9.1.3; Teddi Safman, Utah System of Higher Education

    Vermont
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    Virginia
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No, although all schools must provide either three Advanced Placement courses, dual enrollment courses, IB courses, Cambridge courses, or any combination thereof.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. High schools' School Performance Report Cards must include the percentage of students enrolled in IB programs and the percentage of students who receive IB diplomas.
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees Yes. The department of education anticipates that it will pay $53 for each IB exam taken by a low-income student in a public or private school. "It is anticipated that AP/IB test fees will be reimbursed up to 200 exams per" district.
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: 8 VA. ADMIN. CODE § 20-131-100
    Accountability incentives: VA. CODE ANN. § 22.1-253.13:3; 8 VA. ADMIN. CODE § 20-131-270
    Test fees: Virginia Department of Education memo, December 21, 2006

    Washington
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No

    West Virginia
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No. However, effective with the 2008-2009 school year, all high schools must offer a minimum of four AP courses or the International Baccalaureate program.
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs Yes. 2007 S.B. 657 authorizes the state board of education to award, for purposes of school or district accreditation, bonus points or credits for "International Baccalaureate completers."
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores No
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Offering mandated: W. VA. CODE ST. R. 126-42-5.6.1
    Accountability incentives: 2007 S.B. 657 (W. VA. CODE ANN. § 18-2E-5)

    Wisconsin
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses Yes. The state's Advanced Coursework Expansion Reimbursement offers funds to partially reimburse districts for the costs of offering IB and Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high schools that added new IB or AP courses during the previous school year. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction received funds for the program in 2006-2007 and included $100,000 for the program in its 2007-2009 biennial budget proposal, which is pending legislative approval as of August 2007.
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. All University of Wisconsin System campuses must award college credit for scores of 4 or higher on an IB Higher Level (HL) exam. Additional credit must be awarded students who complete the IB diploma program. Most campuses do not award credit based on the results of IB Standard Level (SL) exam results.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources

    Financial incentives: WIS. STAT. ANN. § 115.28(45); Application Package for Advanced Placement Expansion 2006-2007; Chrys Mursky, Gifted and Talented and Advanced Placement Consultant, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
    Credit for minimum scores: University of Wisconsin HELP Online Web site; University of Wisconsin Board of Regents Policy Manual (page 25 of 103)


    Wyoming
    International Baccalaureate
    State mandates IB program offerings No
    State provides financial incentives for IB courses No
    State provides accountability incentives for IB programs No
    State programs and funding for IB teacher training No
    State subsidies for IB test fees No
    State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain IB scores No
    Collaboration on IB between K-12 and higher education systems No
    State support for encouraging access to IB No
    State public postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum IB scores Yes. The University of Wyoming is the sole public senior institution in the state and provides credit for minimum scores on IB exams.
    Student must take IB exam to receive course credit No
    Sources Credit for minimum scores: University of Wyoming Web site



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