Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
Redesigned Teacher Compensation District - Level Programs
Alabama : Mobile Transformed Schools Program -District Level
Program Statistics
Name and Level Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

Mobile Transformed Schools Plan is a program for Mobile County Public School System.

Status Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

Mobile Transformed School Plan was established in 5 schools in August 2004. The reform model undertaken at these five schools serves as a pilot project for the rest of the district.

Program Description Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

The Mobile Transformed Schools Plan is an innovative program intended to completely transform the instructional programs and the entire certified and support staff in five of the school system’s lowest-performing schools. It is designed to attract quality teachers who are committed to using new and dramatically different approaches in turning around underachieving schools, thus improving student learning and test scores. In 2003, principals and all teachers in each of these five schools were reconstituted. Some principals and teachers stayed, but only after re-applying for their positions. Participants in the program must make a commitment that they will remain at the school for a minimum of five years. Mobile County is the first school system in Alabama to offer an incentive program to attract these kinds of quality teachers to help students most in need.

Other Programs No information found.
Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
Program Target Components
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Mobile Transformed School Plan

    Transformed School schools were selected because they were most in need of help. Students in those schools scored the lowest in Mobile County on the Stanford Achievement Test last year. At least 97 percent of the students at each of the five schools are black and 90 percent are poor, according to information from the State Department of Education.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    Teachers may receive:

    • a signing bonus in September
    • a performance incentive at the end of each year

    Performance evaluations are based on:

    • 40% individual teacher performance;
    • 10% grade or team performance;
    • 50% achieving or exceeding Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) goals.
    Incentives Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    Under the plan, teachers will be paid a $4,000 signing bonus in September and could receive a $4,000 performance incentive at the end of each year, based on a performance evaluation and student success. A principal could get a total of $12,000, an assistant principal $9,000, and other professionals $8,000.

    Incentive Recipients Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    Teachers, principals, assistant principals and other professionals who have been selected to work at the Transformed Schools.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    The Mobile Transformed Schools Plan uses teacher evaluations by principals and AYP data to evaluate potential incentive recipients.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    The Mobile County Board of School Commissioners worked alongside the Mobile Area Education Foundation to create the Transformed Schools Plan.

    Program Funding
    Cost Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    MCPSS leaders estimate that they will spend $1.8 million on bonuses intended as performance incentives for principals, assistant principals, and teachers.

    Funding Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    The costs of the performance incentives will be provided through the reallocation of existing federal funding, tobacco settlement monies, and the general fund balance.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    No information found.


    Colorado : Denver ProComp -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Denver ProComp

    Denver ProComp is a program for Denver public schools.

    Status Denver ProComp

    ProComp is ongoing.

    • 1999-2003
      Four year pilot program started in 16 Denver schools,
    • 2001
      Joint Task Force on teacher compensation was formed,
    • 2004
      Final ProComp plan approved,
    • 2005
      Denver voters approved a $25 million mill levy to fund the compensation plan,
    • 2006
      ProComp Salary System went into effect,
    • 2006
      Nearly 1,200 educators had joined ProComp.
    Program Description Denver ProComp

    The ProComp system is a results-based pay program that uses multiple criteria to assess teachers’ performance. Teachers do not receive increases until they demonstrate results. A new teacher evaluation system was field-tested during the 2004-2005 school year. ProComp contains nine different avenues for increasing pay – most of which are based on objective criteria. They include meeting annual instructional objectives, working in hard-to-serve schools or hard-to-staff assignments, obtaining certification from the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, and more. Teachers set their objectives at the beginning of the year in consultation with the principal. At the end of the year, a rubric helps the teacher and principal fairly assess performance against objectives.

    Other Programs Douglas County, Colorado
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Denver ProComp

    ProComp has four components that allow teachers to build earnings through nine elements. One component, known as the Market Incentive Component, targets hard-to-staff schools and subjects.

    The purpose of the Market Incetive Component is to attract and retain teachers of demonstrated accomplishment to designated assignments and schools.

    Hard to Staff

    Teachers/specialists who work in positions that are considered difficult to fill will receive a 3% Index Bonus. Hard to Staff assignments are classified as those where the supply of licensed professionals is low and the rate of turnover is high.

    Hard to Serve

    Teachers/specialists at schools considered hard to serve will receive a 3% Index Bonus every year the school is eligible. Hard to serve schools are those with a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Denver ProComp

    ProComp has four components that allow teachers to build earnings through nine elements:

    Knowledge and Skills

    • Professional Development Unit: Teachers who complete one Professional Development Unit in their current or proposed area of assignment will receive a salary increase of 2% of the index after
      • Completing approved courses,
      • Demonstrating their skills and
      • Reflecting on the value of the knowledge for use with their students.
    • Graduate Degree/National Board Certificates: Teachers who earn graduate degrees or certificates from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards relevant to their current or proposed assignment will receive a salary increase of 9% of the index for the life of the degree or certificate.
    • Tuition: Teachers will receive reimbursement for up to $1000 for the course of their careers for tuition for coursework in their current or proposed area of assignment.

    Professional Evaluation

    • Satisfactory Evaluation: Salary increases of 3% Index for teachers who receive a satisfactory evaluation. Evaluations would be given every three years.
    • Unsatisfactory Evaluation: Delay satisfactory performance salary increase for teachers with an unsatisfactory performance rating until the teacher receives a rating of satisfactory or better.

    Student Growth

    • Annual Objectives: Teachers/specialists will set two annual objectives. Those who meet both of their annual objectives will receive a salary increase of 1% Index. Teachers who meet one objective will receive a 1% Index bonus. Teachers who do not meet either objective will receive no increase.
    • Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP): Teachers whose students exceed an agreed-upon range for one year's growth as measured by CSAP math and reading will receive a 3% sustainable increase. Teachers who fall below the lower limit of a standard range will lose their sustainable increase if they have earned on in the past.
    • Distinguished Schools: Teachers who work in schools defined as "distinguished" will receive a bonus of 2% Index. Distinguished schools will be determined annually based on 30-40 school accreditation indicators. These include outstanding results based on student growth data and factors such as school climate, attendance and graduation rates.

    Market Incentives

    • Hard to Staff: Teachers/specialists who work in positions that are considered difficult to fill will receive a 3% Index Bonus. Hard to Staff assignments are classified as those where the supply of licensed professionals is low and the rate of turnover is high.
    • Hard to Serve: Teachers/specialists at schools considered hard to serve will receive a 3% Index Bonus every year the school is eligible. Hard to serve schools are those with a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch.
    Incentives Denver ProComp

    Types of compensation include bonuses and salary increases.

    Bonuses and salary increases are based on a salary index, a dollar amount negotiated by DPS and DCTA. It is subject to routine cost of living adjustments through collective bargaining. The index for 2005-06 is $33,301.

    Incentive Recipients Denver ProComp

    Teachers and student services providers in hard-to-staff assignments or hard-to-serve schools are among the first eligible for the bonuses.

    Current teachers will be able to opt-in over the first seven years or remain in the current system. New teachers hired in 2006 will automatically join ProComp.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Denver ProComp

    Student growth objectives set collaboratively by teacher and principal apply to students in attendance 85% of the time.

    Teachers are evaluated (effective 2006-07) by the principal and a trained, independent evaluator. Well developed rubrics articulating different levels of teacher performance and a self evaluation component are used.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Denver ProComp

    The Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) was a partner in creating the 1999 Denver Public Schools (DPS) Pay for Performance Pilot, which studied the relationship between teaching, assessing growth in student learning and teacher compensation.

    A Design Team of two teachers and two administrators was charged with planning, implementing and evaluating the pilot. The compromise also called for a study which was conducted by the Community Training and Assistance Center of Boston. As a result of the initial findings of that study, DPS and DCTA decided that a new teacher compensation agreement could not be based on student objectives alone.

    In 2001, the district and the association formed the Joint Task Force on Teacher Compensation. The task force's charge was to design a new comprehensive pay system for teachers based, in part, on the insights and learnings from the Design Team managing the pilot as well as the CTAC research study.

    The Task Force was charged with developing an equitable and affordable salary system for teachers based, in part, on the academic achievement of students. It was composed of teachers, principals, central office administrators and community members selected by Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association. Their recommendations were shared with teachers and administrators in the form of draft recommendations in the Spring of 2003.

    Final recommendations were incorporated into an overall plan that was submitted to the Board of Education and members of the Denver Classroom Teachers Association in early 2004. The final plan which was named the Professional Compensation Plan for Teachers, or ProComp, was approved by the DPS Board in February and DCTA members accepted the plan in March 2004.

    Other Stakeholders Denver ProComp

    In addition to teachers and teacher unions, principals, central office administrators, community members, and legislators were all involved in the assessment of the pilot program and in the design of the Denver ProComp program.

    Program Funding
    Cost Denver ProComp

    November 2005 ballot measure for $25 million mill levy was passed by Denver voters.

    A ProComp chart that shows the new index of $33,301.00 and new payout amounts for each of the elements of the program.

    Funding Denver ProComp

    ProComp’s increased earnings for teachers are affordable because the system is based on a mill levy override that adds $25 million per year, solely for teacher compensation under ProComp. The system was implemented after Denver voters approved additional funding through a mill levy election in November 2005. This $25 million annual revenue increase is permanent and will build over time, totaling $250 million in 10 years and $750 million over 30 years.

    Importantly, proceeds from the mill levy will be placed in a trust fund governed by a board of directors that includes representatives from Denver Public Schools, DCTA and the community. Designers of ProComp projected the system costs 50 years into the future. Based on a mill levy increase, the model proves that the system is secure and sustainable. In the early years, revenues would exceed expenditures as ProComp is phased in. Like a retirement fund, any surplus money will be invested to stabilize short-term fluctuations in the cost of the system. Over time, the system will become self-sustaining as teachers retire at the top end and are replaced by newer teachers entering the district at lower salaries.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Denver ProComp

    No information found at this time.


    North Carolina : Guilford Mission Possible -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Mission Possible

    Mission Possible is a district level program for Guilford County Schools in North Carolina.

    Status Mission Possible

    Guilford County Schools introduced the Mission Possible plan for the 2006-2007 school year. The program will expand to an additional seven schools using TIF funds granted in November 2006.

    Program Description Mission Possible

    GCS Mission Possible is a teacher incentive program designed to attract and retain teachers for underserved schools and subject areas and to reward teachers for outstanding results. It is a comprehensive support program for teachers in selected schools focusing on high quality staff development and smaller class sizes. GCS Mission Possible schools aim to be professional learning communities with supportive leaders and collaborative work environments. The program includes: 1.) Professional Training, 2.) Recruitment and Retention Bonuses, and 3.) Performance Incentives. To receive bonuses, teachers must show student achievement by a certain margin on state achievement tests. The program also includes sanctions for weak teachers.

    Other Programs ABCs, Charlotte-Mecklenburg High School Challenge EOC Retention Program, Charlotte-Mecklenburg STAR Program and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Performance-Based Pay Pilot
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Mission Possible

    GCS Mission Possible aims to reward math and reading teachers and principals at historically low-performing schools in the district.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Mission Possible

    The compensation structure includes 2 categories (in addition to required professional training) for which teachers can receive incentive bonuses. The recruitment/retention incentive category offers incentives for teachers who teach specific grade levels and subject areas. The performance incentive rewards Value Added Scores and AYP for the schools.

    Incentives Mission Possible

    Recruitment/Retention Incentives include:

    • $2,500 for K-2 classroom teachers
    • $2,500 for 3rd-8th grade classroom teachers who teach reading, language arts, or math
    • $9,000 for middle and high school math teachers
    • $10,000 for middle and high school Algebra I teachers
    • $5,000-$10,000 for school principals
    The Performance Incentives offer:
    • $2,500-$4,000 for qualifying Value Added Scores
    • $2,500-$5,000 for school AYP
    Incentive Recipients Mission Possible

    Teachers and principals who have been selected to work at the Mission Possible schools.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Mission Possible Student achievement test scores, value added scores and AYP are used for evaluation.
    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Mission Possible

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Mission Possible

    The Superintendent of Guilford County Schools is credited with the creation of Mission Possible.

    Program Funding
    Cost Mission Possible

    Approximately $10 million for incentive bonuses.

    Funding Mission Possible

    Action Greensboro and the federal Teacher Incentive Fund have provided the funding for the Mission Possible program.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Mission Possible

    No information found.


    North Carolina : Charlotte-Mecklenburg High School Challenge EOC Retention Program -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    High School Challenge EOC Retention Program is one of several district level incentive programs for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina. It is available at Garinger, West Charlotte, and West Mecklenburg High Schools.

    Status High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Currently, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools has 35 incentive programs which have been funded to attract administrators and other instructional personnel to targeted schools.

    Program Description High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    The High School Challenge EOC Retention Program aims to retain teachers demonstrating High Academic Change (High Growth) on EOC ("end of course") exams at Garinger, West Charlotte and West Mecklenburg High Schools.

    Other Programs ABCs, Guilford Mission Possible, Charlotte-Mecklenburg STAR Program and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Performance-Based Pay Pilot
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    The High School Challenge EOC Retention Program is an effort to recruit and retain well-qualified teachers in the district.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Successful participants in this program receive $5,000 each year. (The amount of each award will be pro-rated to the percent employment.)

    Incentives High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Successful participants in this program receive $5,000 each year. (The amount of each award will be pro-rated to the percent employment.) Teachers continue to be eligible for any individual performance based programs at the High School Challenge schools in addition to the ABC and Local Accountability incentives.

    Incentive Recipients High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    EOC teachers of record at Garinger, West Charlotte or West Mecklenburg who demonstrated individual High Academic Change.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Teachers are evaluated based on the results of the end-of-course exams.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    • Citizens’ Task Force on Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
    • State Board of Education Teacher Retention Task Force
    Program Funding
    Cost High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    No information found.

    Funding High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Bonus programs are subject to annual legislative and budgetary determinations.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    According to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District, Teacher Retention has increased from 78.2% to 84.5% between 2000 and 2005. Teacher turnover has decreased from 21.8% in 2000 to 16.6% in 2005.


    North Carolina : Charlotte-Mecklenburg STAR Program -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level STAR Program - Successful Teacher Administrator Reward

    The STAR Program is one of several district level incentive programs for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina. It offers financial reward program to teachers who teach in FOCUS schools in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district.

    Status STAR Program

    The STAR program is one of 35 incentive programs which have been funded to attract administrators and other instructional personnel to targeted schools in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district.

    Program Description STAR Program

    The STAR program offers financial awards for outstanding student achievement at the individual level in FOCUS schools.

    Other Programs ABCs, Guilford Mission Possible, Charlotte-Mecklenburg High School Challenge EOC Retention Program and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Performance-Based Pay Pilot
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff school
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component STAR Program

    FOCUS Schools in Charlotte-Mecklenburg are schools where children need individual attention and extra support.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure STAR Program

    Teachers employed full time at one or a combination of FOCUS schools, who have an EOG, EOC, K- 2 Assessment, EC (NCCLAS, NCEXTEND2, or NCAAP) or Writing 10 achievement measure. The STAR Bonus is tied to high academic change or achievement levels on these test measures.

    Incentives STAR Program

    Teachers may receive a maximum of $1400. Principals and Assistant Principals may receive up to $5000.

    Incentive Recipients STAR Program

    • Principals and Assistant Principals
    • Teachers of record in areas of instructional responsibility resulting in the following areas of testing/assessment: EOG, EOC, K-2 Assessment, Writing 10 or EC (NCCLAS, NCAAP or NCEXTEND2)
    • EC teachers that co-teach in an EOC or EOG subject full time with a regular education teacher
    • Literacy Facilitators if students in the school meet the High Academic Change standard on the Reading EOG.
    • Math Facilitators if students in the school meet the High Academic Change standard on the Math EOC
    • Team Teachers
    • EC Inclusion Teachers
    • Teachers, Principals and Assistant Principals must be assigned to a participating school by October 2, 2006, and continue 100% employment in one or a combination of the participating schools to the end of the 2006-2007 school year.
    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation STAR Program

    No information found.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions STAR Program

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders STAR Program

    No information found.

    Program Funding
    Cost STAR Program

    No information found.

    Funding STAR Program

    No information found.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes STAR Program

    No information found.


    North Carolina : Charlotte-Mecklenburg Performance-Based Pay Pilot -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    The Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program is one of several district level incentive programs for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina.

    Status Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    The Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program is one of 35 incentive programs which have been funded to attract administrators and other instructional personnel to targeted schools in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district. It is currently being piloted at 12 schools.

    Program Description Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    The Performance-Based Pay Pilot program aims to enhance individual employee performance and student achievement by providing financial bonuses based on attendance, student achievement and professional development.

    Other Programs ABCs, Guilford Mission Possible, Charlotte-Mecklenburg High School Challenge EOC Retention Program and Charlotte-Mecklenburg STAR Program
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • No hard-to-staff, high needs or at-risk component found
  • Description of Component Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    All employees that are full-time at 10 pilot schools will be eligible to receive a Pay for Performance Bonus based on their achievement of Attendance AND Professional Development measures.

    • An additional Achievement Bonus will be offered ONLY to employees that have DPI State Mandated or Locally Aligned Tests. This bonus may be earned SEPARATELY from the Attendance/Professional Development bonus and is tied to student achievement on specifically defined tests.
    • The Achievement Bonus DOES NOT need to be met to achieve the Professional Development/Attendance Bonus. Each of the two bonuses stands alone.
    • The Achievement Bonus for the 2006-2007 school year can only be measured in classes that have 10 or more students pre- and post-tested.
    • At least 95% of students must be tested.
    Incentives Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    Licensed teachers may receive:

    • $1400 for achievement
    • $600 for Attendance/Professional Development

    Non-Licensed teachers may receive:

    • $300 for Attendance/Professional Development
    • not eligible for Achievement
    Incentive Recipients Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    Full-time employees who are assigned only to a pilot school location(s) by October 1 of that school year who are:

    • Instructional staff
    • Non-instructional staff
    • Literacy and Math Facilitators if students in the school meet the High Academic Change standard on the Reading or Math EOG
    • Team Teachers who are teaching reading, math or an EOC subject as identified by the Principal
    • EC Inclusion Teachers as identified by the Principal
    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.

    Program Funding
    Cost Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.

    Funding Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Performance-Based Pay Pilot Program

    No information found.


    Texas : Houston Independent School District (HISD) -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    This is a district level program.

    Status Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Approved by the Houston Independent School District's (HISD) school board in January, 2006. This is an ongoing program.

    Program Description Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    The Houston Independent School District's (HISD) school board unanimously approved a teacher merit pay program, making it the largest school district in the nation to tie teacher pay with student test scores. HISD's Teacher Performance Pay Plan rewards teachers on their individual performance, regardless of how students in the rest of the school score. Core teachers can earn $3,000 more a year, and non-core teacher can earn up to $1,500 more a year, if their students demonstrate strong progress on state and national achievement tests compared with students in other similar classrooms and schools around Houston and Texas. The annual bonuses could grow to $10,000 in the next five years. As an additional bonus, teachers with perfect attendance will have their earned performance pay increased by 10 percent, and teachers who have missed no more than two days will have their earned performance pay increased by five percent.

    There are three different “strands” or components of the plan, each worth a maximum of $1,000 for core teachers.

    Source: HISD

    Other Programs Texas Educator Excellence Awards and Aldine Independent School District (AISD)Performance Incentives.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • No hard-to-staff, high needs or at-risk component found
  • Description of Component Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    No information found.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Teachers receive annual bonuses.

    Incentives Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Each campus will be evaluated to determine if it meets the Texas Education Agency (TEA) Accountability standard. A campus that does not meet the standard is not eligible for Strand 1 incentives.

    Strand II (Individual Teacher Performance) - Eligible teachers must show "positive" Comparable Improvement (CI) of his/her Instructional Cohort on the relevant subject test of the Stanford/Aprenda.

    Strand III (Individual Teacher Performance) - Eligible teachers must show "positive" Comparable Improvement (CI) of his/her Instructional Cohort on the relevant subtest of the TAKS.

    Incentive Recipients Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Every teacher (grades K-12) is eligible to participate in the first two strands.

    Teachers eligible to participate in the third strand include:

    • Homeroom teachers in grades 4-5 for reading and math
    • Core teachers teaching students in grades 6 -11 with two consecutive years of data.
    • Homeroom teachers in grade 3 for reading and math and in grade 5 for science
    • Core teachers teaching social studies in grade 8.
    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Strand I (Campus-Level Performance)
    Strand I considers the school’s state accountability rating for eligibility in the strand and rewards teachers based on how well the school has improved when compared with 40 other schools with similar demographics around the state.

    Strand II (Individual Teacher Performance)
    Strand II pays individual teachers based on student progress on the Stanford 10 Achievement Test and its Spanish-language equivalent, the Aprenda 3, when compared with teachers in similar HISD classrooms. Elementary core teachers would be measured by progress on the complete battery of tests, while secondary core teachers would be measured using their subject area tests.

    Strand III (Individual Teacher Performance)
    Strand III pays individual teachers based on student progress on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) when compared with teachers in similar HISD classrooms. Elementary core teachers would be measured by progress by grade level in reading and math scale scores. Secondary core teachers would be measured using improvement in subject-area scale scores including Reading, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. Another component of the third strand involves teachers who administer TAKS tests for which there would only be one year of data, such as grade 3 reading and math, grade 5 science, grade 8 social studies, and grade 10 social studies and science. These teachers would be compared to a campus standard that would be based on the previous year’s campuswide performance.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Teacher’s unions objected to the merit pay program.

    Other Stakeholders Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    Houston Independent School District trustee, administration, teachers, parents, economic development allies, and taxpayers

    Program Funding
    Cost Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    The district has allocated $14.5 million for the proposed teacher-performance-pay program for the the 2005–06 school year. In the event that earned performance pay exceeds the $14.5 million allocated, performance-pay amounts will be prorated for all employees eligible for performance-pay plans. Over time, this amount is expected to increase. In the event that earned performance pay exceeds the $14.5 million allocated, performance pay amounts will be prorated. Funds to eligible teachers and non-instructional staff meeting the performance criteria will be available at the end of January 2007 based on 2005–06 performance. Consideration is being made to distribute the funds for Strands II and III earlier as the information becomes available instead of waiting to do a complete distribution at the time that Strand I is calculated.

    Funding Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    The Houston Independent School District funds the program and has allocated $14.5 million for the teacher performance pay program for the 2005–06 school year. No plan for sustainability was found.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Houston Independent School District (HISD)

    No information found at this time.


    Texas : Aldine Independent School District (AISD) Performance Inentives -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    Aldine ISD Critical Needs Supplement and the Performance Pay Incentive are district programs in the Aldine Independent School District.

    Status Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    Aldine ISD began an incentive program in 1995 to reward school employees for helping improve student achievement. Both programs appear to be active.

    Program Description Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Fully certified teachers who teach in “Critical Need Areas” — including math, science, and reading in grades 7-12, and bilingual and special education at all levels — are eligible for annual supplements. These bonuses are all based on a 6 period day of teaching every period in the critical need area—if a teacher teaches a portion of their day in these subjects, the bonus is based on the proportion of the day in the critical needs subject area.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    Aldine ISD’s salary program has earned wide, well-deserved acclaim for linking bonuses to individual student and individual school success. Aldine’s Performance Incentives link bonuses to student attendance, teacher retention, percentage of students passing state assessments, and percentage of students scoring at a specific level of achievement gains on assessments. Teachers and other campus personnel who meet verifiable performance standards are eligible to receive incentives which are distributed within each school at the discretion of a campus steering committee.

    Other Programs Houston Independent School District and The Educator Excellence Awards Program.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Description of Component Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    The critical subject areas include bilingual, math/science/reading, special education, ESL, and Montessori.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    Not applicable.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers who are fully certified in the critical subject areas receive a yearly bonus for teaching:

    • Bilingual
    • 7th-12th Math, Science and Reading
    • Special Education (all levels)
    • ESL (all levels)
    • Montessori
    Performance Pay Incentive
    Bonuses are based on:
    • Student attendance
    • teacher retention
    • Percentage of students passing state assessments
    • Percentage of students scoring at a specific level of achievement gains on assessments
    Incentives Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers receive the following yearly bonuses:

    • Bilingual= $4,000/ yr
    • 7th-12th Math, Science and Reading= $3,000/ yr
    • Special Education (all levels)= $3,000/ yr
    • ESL (all levels)= $2,000/yr
    • Montessori= $1,500/yr
    Performance Pay Incentive
    Awards to schools typically range from $80,000 to $120,000, depending on the size of the school. Although each case is different, a recognized elementary school principal may receive an award of $7,000; an assistant principal, $4,500; and teachers, from $500 to $1,000. A principal of a large, recognized high school may receive $18,000; assistant principals, $9,000. Teachers are eligible to receive incentives between $500 and $1,500.
    Incentive Recipients Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers who teach critical subjects.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    Schools receive awards which are given to principals, teachers and other campus personnel who meet the performance standards.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers must teach in a critical subject.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    The Texas Education Agency rates the district based on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test results as well as other verifiable performance standards.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    No information found.

    Program Funding
    Cost Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    No information found.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    $4.5 million for the 2005-06 school year

    Funding Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    The funding comes primarily from the district’s general fund, but the district also uses some Title I money to pay bonuses earned by teachers working in schools that receive Title I funds.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    No information found.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    In 1995, TEA gave the district an “Accredited” rating, the minimum acceptable rating at that time. By contrast, from 1997 to 2002,following the implementation of the incentive program and other initiatives designed to improve student performance,the district has held a “Recognized” accountability rating.




    © 2013 by the Education Commission of the States (ECS). All rights reserved. ECS is the only nationwide, nonpartisan interstate compact devoted to education.

    To request permission to excerpt part of this publication, either in print or electronically, please fax a request to the attention of the ECS Communications Department, 303.296.8332 or e-mail ecs@ecs.org.

    Helping State Leaders Shape Education Policy