Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
Redesigned Teacher Compensation Programs with At-Risk Components
This is a report generated from the interactive online 2006 ECS Diversified Teacher Compensation Database with research on a number of redesigned teacher compensation programs. Although this database does not represent a comprehensive list of redesigned teacher compensation programs, a diverse array of program types and elements are covered. To be considered for inclusion in this report, programs needed to have financial incentives intended to attract and retain teachers to teach high-need subjects and/or to teach at hard-to-staff schools.

Staff Contact: Angela Baber

Fall 2006


Alabama : Mobile Transformed Schools Program -District Level
Program Statistics
Name and Level Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

Mobile Transformed Schools Plan is a program for Mobile County Public School System.

Status Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

Mobile Transformed School Plan was established in 5 schools in August 2004. The reform model undertaken at these five schools serves as a pilot project for the rest of the district.

Program Description Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

The Mobile Transformed Schools Plan is an innovative program intended to completely transform the instructional programs and the entire certified and support staff in five of the school system’s lowest-performing schools. It is designed to attract quality teachers who are committed to using new and dramatically different approaches in turning around underachieving schools, thus improving student learning and test scores. In 2003, principals and all teachers in each of these five schools were reconstituted. Some principals and teachers stayed, but only after re-applying for their positions. Participants in the program must make a commitment that they will remain at the school for a minimum of five years. Mobile County is the first school system in Alabama to offer an incentive program to attract these kinds of quality teachers to help students most in need.

Other Programs No information found.
Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
Program Target Components
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Mobile Transformed School Plan

    Transformed School schools were selected because they were most in need of help. Students in those schools scored the lowest in Mobile County on the Stanford Achievement Test last year. At least 97 percent of the students at each of the five schools are black and 90 percent are poor, according to information from the State Department of Education.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    Teachers may receive:

    • a signing bonus in September
    • a performance incentive at the end of each year

    Performance evaluations are based on:

    • 40% individual teacher performance;
    • 10% grade or team performance;
    • 50% achieving or exceeding Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) goals.
    Incentives Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    Under the plan, teachers will be paid a $4,000 signing bonus in September and could receive a $4,000 performance incentive at the end of each year, based on a performance evaluation and student success. A principal could get a total of $12,000, an assistant principal $9,000, and other professionals $8,000.

    Incentive Recipients Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    Teachers, principals, assistant principals and other professionals who have been selected to work at the Transformed Schools.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    The Mobile Transformed Schools Plan uses teacher evaluations by principals and AYP data to evaluate potential incentive recipients.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    The Mobile County Board of School Commissioners worked alongside the Mobile Area Education Foundation to create the Transformed Schools Plan.

    Program Funding
    Cost Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    MCPSS leaders estimate that they will spend $1.8 million on bonuses intended as performance incentives for principals, assistant principals, and teachers.

    Funding Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    The costs of the performance incentives will be provided through the reallocation of existing federal funding, tobacco settlement monies, and the general fund balance.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Mobile Transformed Schools Plan

    No information found.


    Arkansas : Incentives for Teacher Recruitment and Retention in High Priority Districts -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level State level incentives for teacher recruitment and retention in high-priority districts.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Status Appears to be ongoing.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Program Description Incentives for teacher recruitment and retention in high-priority districts:

    Beginning in the 2004-2005 school year, a teacher licensed by the state board who teaches in a school in a high priority district shall receive in addition to all other salary and benefits:

    • For new teachers, a one time signing bonus to work in any high-priority district and a bonus for the following two years if the teacher continues to work in the same high-priority district. If a teacher receives the bonus pay and leaves prior to the three year bonus pay period, they shall pay back the amount of the bonus received in the previous year. If the teacher leaves during the school year, they shall pay back the previous year’s and the current year’s bonuses.
    • For all teachers not newly signed to work in the district, a retention bonus is paid at the beginning of the 2004-2005 school year and each of the next two years if they continue to work in the high-priority district. If the teacher voluntarily leaves prior to the end of the three year bonus pay period, they shall pay back on a pro-rata basis the amount of the bonus received in the previous years and if they leave during the school year, they must pay back the previous year’s and the current year’s bonuses. If the teacher is reassigned involuntarily to a position that is not eligible for bonus pay or dismissed by a school district, they are not required to repay the bonus pay.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Other Programs The Arkansas Comprehensive Testing and Accountability Program for schools.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component Incentives for teacher recruitment and retention in high-priority districts:

    Beginning in the 2004-2005 school year, a teacher licensed by the state board who teaches in a school in a high priority district shall receive in addition to all other salary and benefits:

    • For new teachers, a one time signing bonus to work in any high-priority district and a bonus for the following two years if the teacher continues to work in the same high-priority district. If a teacher receives the bonus pay and leaves prior to the three year bonus pay period, they shall pay back the amount of the bonus received in the previous year. If the teacher leaves during the school year, they shall pay back the previous year’s and the current year’s bonuses.
    • For all teachers not newly signed to work in the district, a retention bonus is paid at the beginning of the 2004-2005 school year and each of the next two years if they continue to work in the high-priority district. If the teacher voluntarily leaves prior to the end of the three year bonus pay period, they shall pay back on a pro-rata basis the amount of the bonus received in the previous years and if they leave during the school year, they must pay back the previous year’s and the current year’s bonuses. If the teacher is reassigned involuntarily to a position that is not eligible for bonus pay or dismissed by a school district, they are not required to repay the bonus pay.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure In addition to all other salary and benefits, a one time signing bonus and a bonus for the following two years are available for a total of a three-year period.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Incentives For new teachers, the one-time signing bonus of $4,000 with an additional $3,000 paid for the next two subsequent years.

    For existing teachers, a retention bonus of $2,000 shall be paid for the three year bonus pay period.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Incentive Recipients For new teachers, the one-time signing bonus of $4,000 with an additional $3,000 paid for the next two subsequent years.

    For existing teachers, a retention bonus of $2,000 shall be paid for the three year bonus pay period.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation No information found.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions No information found.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Other Stakeholders No information found.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Program Funding
    Cost No information found.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Funding No information found.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes The department of education shall monitor the implementation of the incentive program and collect data to be used to evaluate the incentive program’s effectiveness.

    Enabling policy: §6-17-811


    California : Vaughn Next Century Learning Center -Local Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    Vaughn Next Century Learning Center, located in Pacoima, is a large urban, PreK - 14th, Independent Conversion Charter School within the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD).

    Status Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    In 1993 Vaughn became the first conversion charter school in the nation and was authorized by Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The charter was renewed in 1998 and again in 2003. This program is ongoing.

    Program Description Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    Vaughn Next Century Learning Center, located in Pacoima, is a large urban public school within the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Since the early 1970’s, low student achievement has been a pattern. In 1993 Vaughn became the first conversion charter school in the nation and was authorized by LAUSD. The charter was renewed in 1998 and again in 2003.

    This elementary public school is now a full-service, community-based, PK-12th charter school serving 1,917 neighborhood students (96.9% eligible for free meals, 2.8% eligible for reduced meals, 982 English learners, 156 students with disabilities, 98% Hispanic, 1.6% African-American, 0.1% Asian, 0.3% Other White). Vaughn was awarded the California Distinguished Schools Award in 1996 and the National Blue Ribbon Schools Award in 1997.

    In addition to diversifying teacher pay based on alternative evaluation methods, Vaughn also defines teaching environment, teacher training and professional growth and teacher leadership program components.

    Teaching Environment

    Teacher teaming and goal-oriented collaboration
    Teachers form teams of three teachers responsible for sixty students. Each team consists of an experienced teacher with ten or more years of teaching experience. He or she is partnered up with a teacher with three to five years of experience and one emergency-credentialed, beginning teacher. Each team establishes team goals. The focused, targeted collaboration include frequent communication, weekly planning, search for common solutions, mutual support and help so as to reach collective goals.

    Multiple career opportunities for teachers within the same school
    Paraprofessionals with teaching career goal are provided with varied work schedule (morning, afternoon, afterschool) and better compensation so they can complete their studies in a timely manner. Each year, two or three qualified paraprofessionals are selected to fill vacant teacher positions. Often times, the experienced teachers who train them become their team leaders.

    Gift of time
    The Vaughn school calendar provides four pupil-free days before school begins and 15-20 minimum days throughout the year using banked time. In addition to daily preparation time of thirty minutes before school begins, all teachers receive an hour of common planning time everyday.

    Teacher Training and Professional Growth

    Teaching standards that link to students' learning standards
    Teachers need ongoing feedback about their work and student progress. During the past three years, Vaughn teachers have developed and adopted a set of teaching standards related to lesson planning, classroom management, and various subject areas that are linked to the students' learning standards. Levels of performance in each area are clearly described using a 4-point scale with descriptive rubrics. Teachers know and understanding the collective expectation they have established collectively.

    Assistance and performance review
    The Peer Assistance and Review System takes place three times per year. Teachers reflect on their own performance and rate themselves using the established teaching standards and scoring rubrics. Selected peer reviewers observe their colleagues and provide feedback as well as assistance. Instructional coordinators also conduct classroom visits and conference with teachers on an ongoing basis. Beginning teachers are assigned one-to-one mentors. Elected grade-level chairpersons are responsible for ensuring that teachers understand and focus on grade-level standards. The Director of Instruction and the Principal conduct weekly visits, monitor progress of beginning teachers, and focus on schoolwide goals. Frequent flow of information and consistent feedback about one's progress is an important step for improvement.

    Precise staff development
    Based on individual teacher's performance review, each teacher sets his/her specific professional growth goals with the instructional coordinator. Training opportunities include small group workshops, individualized conferencing, observing another teacher, participation in seminars, conducting research, use of technology, and the assignment of a teacher buddy.

    State initiative and focus on results
    Teachers must base teaching decisions on solid data rather than on assumptions.

    Teacher Leadership

    Distributed leadership
    A supportive teaching environment, a focused teacher training system, and an adequate compensation plan cannot happen without good school leaders. Administrators at Vaughn have realized long ago that sustained reform efforts rely on distributed leadership. Three decision-making committees were established that form our governance body. Each committee consists of 50% staff and 50% parents/community members. The Curriculum and Instructional Committee is the driving force. It is responsible for curricular design, student learning standards and assessment, textbook selection, classroom organization and teaching team formation. The Business and Operation Committee is responsible for all personnel and fiscal matters, staff evaluation, technology, safety and facilities. The Partnership Committee is responsible for home-school-community programs, student discipline, parent education and involvement, and special events. Every three years, a teacher must serve in a committee for a two-year term. Teachers have decision-making authority as well as the responsibility to implement action plans. Teachers with demonstrated skills as effective teachers based on our review system also serve as mentors and peer reviewers. Teachers with leadership skills usually become elected grade level chairpersons, faculty representatives, and committee chairpersons. In addition to a stipend, these teachers are provided with release time, administrative training, and opportunities to attend or present in conferences locally, nationally and internationally.

    Tools for teachers to succeed
    Vaughn has the flexibility to deploy human and fiscal resources to meet priority needs. To enable teachers meet their professional goals and student achievement goals, Vaughn provides them with tools including class size of 20:1 in all grades, a fully-staffed counseling center, a site-based health clinic, a new library, a teacher resource center, adequate books, materials and supplies, afterschool tutoring and homework clubs, a 200-day instructional calendar, and a qualified team of special education teachers who co-teach with the classroom teachers in an inclusive setting. We have also resolved the multitrack, overcrowding problem by building two new school buildings and increased the number of classrooms from 26 to 78.

    Other Programs No information found.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Urban Schools
  • Description of Component Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    Vaughn Next Century Learning Center is a large urban public school. Since the early 1970’s, low student achievement has been a pattern. In 1993, Vaughn became the first conversion charter school in the nation and was authorized by LAUSD. Of the 1,917 students at Vaughn,

    • 96.9% are eligible for free meals,
    • 2.8% are eligible for reduced meals,
    • 982 are English learners,
    • There are 156 students with disabilities,
    • 98% are Hispanic,
    • 1.6% are African-American,
    • 0.1% Asian, and
    • 0.3% Other White.
    All of the components of the Vaughn Next Century Learning Center target an urban and once low-performing high-needs school.
    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    In addition to a base pay and extra compensation for certification and advance degrees, Vaughn pays teachers the following:

    Skills and knowledge pay

    Level 1 skills include literacy, language arts, mathematics, working with special education students in an inclusive setting, classroom management, and lesson planning. A score of 2.5 or higher in the performance review earns $4,300. An overall score of 3.0 in other subject matters (social studies, science, arts, English language learning, physical education) earns another $5,700. Finally, any fully credentialed teacher whose average in all of the areas is 3.5 or higher earns an additional $4,500. The maximum in bonuses that a teacher can earn by getting top scores on every part of the knowledge and skills review is $14,700.

    Contingency-based awards

    Teacher can earn a total of $2,000 a year for achieving certain goals in the areas of student attendance, discipline, parental involvement, and for working in teams.

    Schoolwide student achievement bonus

    All teachers and administrators get an annual bonus of $2,000 if the school as a whole meets the Academic Performance Index goal (API) set by the state regardless how much the state provides. Noncertificated staff and part time staff members also earn a prorated amount.

    Expertise compensation

    Teachers in leadership role including grade level chairs, committee chairs, peer reviewers, mentors, faculty representatives receive additional stipends. A teacher who sponsors afterschool clubs, student government, field learning or teaches intersession, he/she is compensated with $3,500 - $4,000.

    Gainsharing

    Unused sick days will continue to accrue and $250 is provided for every ten unused days as an attendance award. A separate investment account with more than $1,000,000 is set up to guarantee these bonuses when earned. Teachers share the accrued interests as a form of stock option. The amount is estimated at $1,000 per year per teacher.

    Based on last year's payroll records (excluding expertise pay), a first year fully-credentialed teacher earns $47,500. A first year emergency-credentialed teacher earns $ 39,500. A teacher with ten years of teaching experience and scores an average of 3.0 earns $63,850.

    Added benefits

    Vaughn purchased a long-term disability insurance policy for every teacher which provides 60% of their full pay till age 65. In addition, an account with $500,000 in the Los Angeles Teachers' Credit Union was established to guarantee health benefits after retirement.

    All full time contracted, salaried staff, including administrators, counselors, clerical, custodial and cafeteria will be compensation based on performance in the same manner that teachers are being compensated.

    Source: Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Teaching Quality and Professional Growth and Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Performance Based Pay Rubric

    Incentives Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    In addition to a base pay and extra compensation for certification and advance degrees, Vaughn pays teachers the following:

    Skills and knowledge pay

    • A score of 2.5 or higher in the performance review earns a bonus of $4,300
    • An overall score of 3.0 in other subject matters earns another $5,700
    • Any fully credentialed teacher whose average in all of the content areas is 3.5 or higher earns an additional $4,500.
    Note:The maximum in bonuses that a teacher can earn by getting top scores on every part of the knowledge and skills review is $14,700.

    Contingency-based awards

    • Teacher can earn a total of $2,000 a year for achieving certain goals in the areas of student attendance, discipline, parental involvement, and for working in teams.

    Schoolwide student achievement bonus

    • All teachers and administrators get an annual bonus of $2,000 if the school as a whole meets the Academic Performance Index goal (API) set by the state regardless how much the state provides.
    • Noncertificated staff and part time staff members also earn a prorated amount.

    Expertise compensation

    • Teachers in leadership roles receive additional stipends.
    • A teacher who sponsors afterschool clubs, student government, field learning or teaches intersession, he/she is compensated with $3,500 - $4,000.

    Source: Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Teaching Quality and Professional Growth and Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Performance Based Pay Rubric

    Incentive Recipients Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    In addition to a base pay and extra compensation for certification and advance degrees, Vaughn pays teachers the following:

    Skills and knowledge pay

    • Teachers

    Contingency-based awards

    • Teachers

    Schoolwide student achievement bonus

    • Teachers and administrators
    • Noncertificated staff and part time staff members also earn a prorated amount.

    Expertise compensation

    • Teachers in leadership roles
    • A teacher who sponsors afterschool clubs, student government, field learning or teaches intersession

    All full time contracted, salaried staff, including administrators, counselors, clerical, custodial and cafeteria will be compensation based on performance in the same manner that teachers are being compensated.

    Source: Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Teaching Quality and Professional Growth and Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Performance Based Pay Rubric

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    Assistance and Review Process

    The stull evaluation system was replaced with the Peer Assistance and Review System that takes place three times per year. Teachers reflect on their own performance and rate themselves using the established teaching standards and scoring rubrics. Selected peer reviewers (peers from Vaughn and/or objective outside peer reviewers) observe their colleagues and provide feedback as well as assistance. Instructional coordinators also conduct classroom visits and conference with teachers on an ongoing basis. Scoring from self, peer and instructional coordinators are averaged.

    Source: Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Teaching Quality and Professional Growth and Vaughn Next Century Learning Center Performance Based Pay Rubric

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    No information found.

    Program Funding
    Cost Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    No information found.

    Funding Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    No information found.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Vaughn Next Century Learning Center

    Each year, Vaughn has met the growth target established by the California Academic Performance Index (API). API has increased by 263 points from 1999 to 2006.


    Colorado : Denver ProComp -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Denver ProComp

    Denver ProComp is a program for Denver public schools.

    Status Denver ProComp

    ProComp is ongoing.

    • 1999-2003
      Four year pilot program started in 16 Denver schools,
    • 2001
      Joint Task Force on teacher compensation was formed,
    • 2004
      Final ProComp plan approved,
    • 2005
      Denver voters approved a $25 million mill levy to fund the compensation plan,
    • 2006
      ProComp Salary System went into effect,
    • 2006
      Nearly 1,200 educators had joined ProComp.
    Program Description Denver ProComp

    The ProComp system is a results-based pay program that uses multiple criteria to assess teachers’ performance. Teachers do not receive increases until they demonstrate results. A new teacher evaluation system was field-tested during the 2004-2005 school year. ProComp contains nine different avenues for increasing pay – most of which are based on objective criteria. They include meeting annual instructional objectives, working in hard-to-serve schools or hard-to-staff assignments, obtaining certification from the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, and more. Teachers set their objectives at the beginning of the year in consultation with the principal. At the end of the year, a rubric helps the teacher and principal fairly assess performance against objectives.

    Other Programs Douglas County, Colorado
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Denver ProComp

    ProComp has four components that allow teachers to build earnings through nine elements. One component, known as the Market Incentive Component, targets hard-to-staff schools and subjects.

    The purpose of the Market Incetive Component is to attract and retain teachers of demonstrated accomplishment to designated assignments and schools.

    Hard to Staff

    Teachers/specialists who work in positions that are considered difficult to fill will receive a 3% Index Bonus. Hard to Staff assignments are classified as those where the supply of licensed professionals is low and the rate of turnover is high.

    Hard to Serve

    Teachers/specialists at schools considered hard to serve will receive a 3% Index Bonus every year the school is eligible. Hard to serve schools are those with a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Denver ProComp

    ProComp has four components that allow teachers to build earnings through nine elements:

    Knowledge and Skills

    • Professional Development Unit: Teachers who complete one Professional Development Unit in their current or proposed area of assignment will receive a salary increase of 2% of the index after
      • Completing approved courses,
      • Demonstrating their skills and
      • Reflecting on the value of the knowledge for use with their students.
    • Graduate Degree/National Board Certificates: Teachers who earn graduate degrees or certificates from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards relevant to their current or proposed assignment will receive a salary increase of 9% of the index for the life of the degree or certificate.
    • Tuition: Teachers will receive reimbursement for up to $1000 for the course of their careers for tuition for coursework in their current or proposed area of assignment.

    Professional Evaluation

    • Satisfactory Evaluation: Salary increases of 3% Index for teachers who receive a satisfactory evaluation. Evaluations would be given every three years.
    • Unsatisfactory Evaluation: Delay satisfactory performance salary increase for teachers with an unsatisfactory performance rating until the teacher receives a rating of satisfactory or better.

    Student Growth

    • Annual Objectives: Teachers/specialists will set two annual objectives. Those who meet both of their annual objectives will receive a salary increase of 1% Index. Teachers who meet one objective will receive a 1% Index bonus. Teachers who do not meet either objective will receive no increase.
    • Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP): Teachers whose students exceed an agreed-upon range for one year's growth as measured by CSAP math and reading will receive a 3% sustainable increase. Teachers who fall below the lower limit of a standard range will lose their sustainable increase if they have earned on in the past.
    • Distinguished Schools: Teachers who work in schools defined as "distinguished" will receive a bonus of 2% Index. Distinguished schools will be determined annually based on 30-40 school accreditation indicators. These include outstanding results based on student growth data and factors such as school climate, attendance and graduation rates.

    Market Incentives

    • Hard to Staff: Teachers/specialists who work in positions that are considered difficult to fill will receive a 3% Index Bonus. Hard to Staff assignments are classified as those where the supply of licensed professionals is low and the rate of turnover is high.
    • Hard to Serve: Teachers/specialists at schools considered hard to serve will receive a 3% Index Bonus every year the school is eligible. Hard to serve schools are those with a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch.
    Incentives Denver ProComp

    Types of compensation include bonuses and salary increases.

    Bonuses and salary increases are based on a salary index, a dollar amount negotiated by DPS and DCTA. It is subject to routine cost of living adjustments through collective bargaining. The index for 2005-06 is $33,301.

    Incentive Recipients Denver ProComp

    Teachers and student services providers in hard-to-staff assignments or hard-to-serve schools are among the first eligible for the bonuses.

    Current teachers will be able to opt-in over the first seven years or remain in the current system. New teachers hired in 2006 will automatically join ProComp.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Denver ProComp

    Student growth objectives set collaboratively by teacher and principal apply to students in attendance 85% of the time.

    Teachers are evaluated (effective 2006-07) by the principal and a trained, independent evaluator. Well developed rubrics articulating different levels of teacher performance and a self evaluation component are used.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Denver ProComp

    The Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) was a partner in creating the 1999 Denver Public Schools (DPS) Pay for Performance Pilot, which studied the relationship between teaching, assessing growth in student learning and teacher compensation.

    A Design Team of two teachers and two administrators was charged with planning, implementing and evaluating the pilot. The compromise also called for a study which was conducted by the Community Training and Assistance Center of Boston. As a result of the initial findings of that study, DPS and DCTA decided that a new teacher compensation agreement could not be based on student objectives alone.

    In 2001, the district and the association formed the Joint Task Force on Teacher Compensation. The task force's charge was to design a new comprehensive pay system for teachers based, in part, on the insights and learnings from the Design Team managing the pilot as well as the CTAC research study.

    The Task Force was charged with developing an equitable and affordable salary system for teachers based, in part, on the academic achievement of students. It was composed of teachers, principals, central office administrators and community members selected by Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association. Their recommendations were shared with teachers and administrators in the form of draft recommendations in the Spring of 2003.

    Final recommendations were incorporated into an overall plan that was submitted to the Board of Education and members of the Denver Classroom Teachers Association in early 2004. The final plan which was named the Professional Compensation Plan for Teachers, or ProComp, was approved by the DPS Board in February and DCTA members accepted the plan in March 2004.

    Other Stakeholders Denver ProComp

    In addition to teachers and teacher unions, principals, central office administrators, community members, and legislators were all involved in the assessment of the pilot program and in the design of the Denver ProComp program.

    Program Funding
    Cost Denver ProComp

    November 2005 ballot measure for $25 million mill levy was passed by Denver voters.

    A ProComp chart that shows the new index of $33,301.00 and new payout amounts for each of the elements of the program.

    Funding Denver ProComp

    ProComp’s increased earnings for teachers are affordable because the system is based on a mill levy override that adds $25 million per year, solely for teacher compensation under ProComp. The system was implemented after Denver voters approved additional funding through a mill levy election in November 2005. This $25 million annual revenue increase is permanent and will build over time, totaling $250 million in 10 years and $750 million over 30 years.

    Importantly, proceeds from the mill levy will be placed in a trust fund governed by a board of directors that includes representatives from Denver Public Schools, DCTA and the community. Designers of ProComp projected the system costs 50 years into the future. Based on a mill levy increase, the model proves that the system is secure and sustainable. In the early years, revenues would exceed expenditures as ProComp is phased in. Like a retirement fund, any surplus money will be invested to stabilize short-term fluctuations in the cost of the system. Over time, the system will become self-sustaining as teachers retire at the top end and are replaced by newer teachers entering the district at lower salaries.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Denver ProComp

    No information found at this time.


    Georgia : Georgia -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Georgia's salary schedule is state-level and includes several diversified compensation components. The following components are:
    • §20-2-212.3 provides for salary increases for hard-to-staff subjects.
    • §20-2-212.4 provides for an additional five percent increase in teacher salary based on student performance.
    • §20-2-213 defines the career ladder program.
    • §20-2-213.1 outlines the pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity program.
    • §20-14-26 through §20-14-41 establishes a single state-wide accountability system.
    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14
    Status All five diversified compensation components of the state's salary schedule appear to be ongoing.

    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Program Description Salary increases

    The state board of education identifies schools and local school systems where an insufficient supply of qualified teachers is available to teach mathematics, science, special education or foreign language based on criteria defined by the board, the Professional Standards Commission and the Office of Student Achievement. Upon determination of shortages each year, the board shall request funds from the general assembly sufficient to provide for salary increases. The increases are not to exceed one additional step on the state salary schedule for which the teacher would otherwise have been entitled for positions contracted for in those locations and fields during the school year.

    Five percent increase

    Any teacher who has acquired rights to continued employment as a teacher shall receive an increase in annual state compensation of five percent beginning the school year following any year in which the students taught by the teacher earn a significant increase in average scores n the criterion-referenced test or any other test selected by the state board of education. The board shall define "significant increase" and the increase earned shall be in addition to all other increases for which the teacher is eligible.

    Career Ladder

    The state board of education is authorized and directed to devise career ladder programs for teachers and other certificated professional personnel which provide such personnel who demonstrate above average or outstanding competencies relative to their respective positions and exhibit above average or outstanding performance in executing their assigned responsibilities with salary supplements in recognition of such competency and performance. Achievement of students beyond the level that is typically expected for their ability shall be included in the performance criteria for any of the respective personnel categories.

    Pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity

    The state board of education shall develop performance criteria to be used to evaluate proposals submitted by local schools or systems for determining exemplary performance at the school site. Such criteria will relate to the overall educational performance of the school in areas related to student outcomes and achievement. The criteria shall also reflect the six national goals for education adopted under Georgia 2000 and socioeconomic or other demographic factors that may affect student achievement or other outcomes of education. The criteria shall reflect school level improvement on identified performance criteria, such as the numbers of remedial, SIA and Chapter I students that achieved grade level performance.

    The performance evaluation system shall be designed to determine the level of improvement achieved by the school based upon those criteria adopted and approved for the school proposal. Local schools which choose to apply for pay-for-performance awards for group productivity shall submit proposals through the local board of education, which must approve the proposals, to the state board of education. Proposals shall be submitted annually and identify which of the state-wide performance criteria will be emphasized by the local school for the determination of award eligibility.

    Single state-wide accountability system (SSAS)

    The purpose of the SSAS, created by the Office of Student Achievement, is to provide valid and reliable accountability, determined at the school, LEA and state levels that can help promote continuous improvement in raising student achievement and closing achievement gaps. This system includes an annual Accountability Profile for each public school and Local Educational Agency (LEA) in the state. The profile has three components: an absolute performance determination that is based on Adequate Yearly Progress, a Performance Index determination based on progress over the previous year's performance, and Performance Highlights that will provide additional information including recognition for each school and LEA based on academic-related indicators.

    Enabling Policy: Office of Student Achievement Code: GBA (4) Chapter 160-7-1-.01

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-37 The Office of Student Achievement (OSA) shall develop and the state board of education shall approve a Georgia schools awards system to recognize school and school systems that demonstrate progress or success in achieving the education goals of the state and achieving excellence on the school rating system as provided for in §20-14-33.

    Unless otherwise noted, Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Other Programs No information found.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component Of the five diversified pay components of the Georgia salary schedule the Salary Increases Component addresses teachers in hard-to-staff schools and subject areas.

    Salary increases

    The state board of education identifies schools and local school systems where an insufficient supply of qualified teachers is available to teach mathematics, science, special education or foreign language based on criteria defined by the board, the Professional Standards Commission and the Office of Student Achievement. Upon determination of shortages each year, the board shall request funds from the general assembly sufficient to provide for salary increases. The increases are not to exceed one additional step on the state salary schedule for which the teacher would otherwise have been entitled for positions contracted for in those locations and fields during the school year.

    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure

    Salary increases

    The state board of education identifies schools and local school systems where an insufficient supply of qualified teachers is available to teach mathematics, science, special education or foreign language based on criteria defined by the board, the Professional Standards Commission and the Office of Student Achievement. Upon determination of shortages each year, the board shall request funds from the general assembly sufficient to provide for salary increases. The increases are not to exceed one additional step on the state salary schedule for which the teacher would otherwise have been entitled for positions contracted for in those locations and fields during the school year.

    Five percent increase

    Any teacher who has acquired rights to continued employment as a teacher shall receive an increase in annual state compensation of five percent beginning the school year following any year in which the students taught by the teacher earn a significant increase in average scores n the criterion-referenced test or any other test selected by the state board of education. The board shall define "significant increase" and the increase earned shall be in addition to all other increases for which the teacher is eligible.

    Career Ladder

    The state board of education is authorized and directed to devise career ladder programs for teachers and other certificated professional personnel which provide such personnel who demonstrate who demonstrate above average or outstanding competencies relative to their respective positions and exhibit above average or outstanding performance in executing their assigned responsibilities with salary supplements in recognition of such competency and performance. Achievement of students beyond the level that is typically expected for their ability shall be included in the performance criteria for any of the respective personnel categories.

    Pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity

    Awards shall be made by the state board of education to each school through the local board for successful school projects no later than December 1 of the school year after the one for which the performance judged exemplary occurred. The amount of the awards shall be distributed through local systems to schools judged exemplary by the state board according to the number of successful school projects, the size of each school and the level of funding provided by the general assembly. The decision of the local school's certificated personnel, in accordance with a process for decision making specified by the state board, will determine how the awards are spent or distributed at the school site.

    Single state-wide accountability system (SSAS)

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-38 Financial awards will be provided to the schools that the director of the Office of Student Achievement determines have demonstrated the greatest improvement in achieving the education goals of improved student achievement and improved school completion.

    Financial awards will be provided to each school that is identified by the director for performance on with or both excellence in student achievement and progress on student achievement. The certificated personnel in a school that is identified by the director as a either a best performing school or better performing school in either or both categories will be provided a bonus for the year. An additional financial award will be provided to each school for noncertificated personnel for each designation of best performing school and for each designation of better performing school.

    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Incentives Salary increases

    The increases are not to exceed one additional step on the state salary schedule for which the teacher would otherwise have been entitled for positions contracted for in those locations and fields during the school year.

    Five percent increase

    Any teacher who has acquired rights to continued employment as a teacher shall receive an increase in annual state compensation of five percent and shall be in addition to all other salary increases for which the teacher is eligible.

    Career Ladder

    The board shall submit its policies and guidelines pertaining to the implementation of career ladder programs to the general assembly for review prior to submitting a request for funds to grant salary supplements under this program.

    Pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity

    The amount of the awards shall be distributed through local systems to schools judged exemplary by the state board of education according to the number of successful school projects, the size of each school and the level of funding provided by the general assembly.

    Single state-wide accountability system (SSAS)

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-38 Financial awards will be provided to each school that is identified by the director for performance on with or both excellence in student achievement and progress on student achievement. The certificated personnel in a school that is identified by the director as a either a best performing school or better performing school in either or both categories will be provided a bonus for the year the school was identified of $1,000 for each best performing school designation and $500 for each better performing school designation. The maximum shall not exceed $2,000 and is subject to appropriation by the general assembly or as otherwise may be provided. An additional financial award will be provided to each school for noncertificated personnel in the amount of $10,000 for each designation of best performing school and $5,000 for each designation of better performing school. The total lump sum noncertificated personnel award for an individual school shall not exceed $20,000. The school receiving the award shall determine the distribution of the award among the noncertificated personnel.

    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Incentive Recipients Salary increases

    The state board of education identifies schools and local school systems where an insufficient supply of qualified teachers is available to teach mathematics, science, special education or foreign language based on criteria defined by the board, the Professional Standards Commission and the Office of Student Achievement. Salary increases are provided for teachers. Upon receiving three such salary increases, a teacher shall become ineligible for additional salary increases under this section.

    Five percent increase

    Any teacher who has acquired rights to continued employment as a teacher shall receive a salary increase.

    Career Ladder

    Career ladder programs provide salary supplements to teachers and other certificated professional personnel.

    Pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity

    Awards will be made to each school through the local board for successful school projects. The decision of the local school's certificated personnel will determine how the awards are spent or distributed at the school site.

    The proceeds may in whole or in part be given to faculty members in the form of bonuses or may be spent for the purpose of providing faculty sabbaticals, for instructional or other equipment, for staff development, for distribution to other school staff in the form of bonuses, or for any other expenditure deemed appropriate by the local school's certificated personnel.

    Single state-wide accountability system (SSAS)

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-38 Financial awards will be provided to each school, the certificated personnel and an additional financial award will be provided to each school for noncertificated personnel. The school receiving the latter award shall determine the distribution of the award among the noncertificated personnel.

    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Salary increases

    The state board of education shall identify the schools and local school systems where an insufficient supply of qualified teachers is available and determine the shortages each year. The criteria used for assessing whether or not an insufficient supply of qualified teachers is available and the data used in making the determination that a shortage exists shall be submitted by the Office of Student Achievement to the Education Committees of both the state Senate and House of Representatives.

    Five percent increase

    Any teacher who has acquired rights to continued employment as a teacher shall receive an increase in annual state compensation of five percent beginning the school year following any year in which the students taught by the teacher earn a significant increase in average scores n the criterion-referenced test or any other test selected by the state board of education. The board shall define "significant increase".

    Career Ladder

    Demonstration of above average or outstanding competencies relative to the employees' position and exhibition of above average or outstanding performance in executing their assigned responsibilities. Achievement of students beyond the level that is typically expected for their ability is included in the performance criteria for any of the respective personnel categories.

    Pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity

    The state board of education shall develop performance criteria to be used to evaluate proposals submitted for the determination of exemplary performance at the school site. The criteria will relate to the overall educational performance of the school in areas related to student outcomes and achievement; reflect the six national goals for education adopted under Georgia 2000; reflect socioeconomic or other factors that may affect student achievement or other outcomes of education; and reflect school level improvement on identified performance criteria.

    The state board of education shall evaluate the performance of all schools submitting proposals for a given year according to the terms of the local school proposal as approved by the state board. The state board shall uniformly apply the criteria for weighing the proposals to the local school proposals. The board may appoint an advisory evaluation team from outside the department of education to assist in the development and application of the criteria by which the proposals will be evaluated.

    Chapter 160-3-1-.01 states that academic achievement criteria includes three or more performance objectives. Objectives that emphasize growth as well as those that emphasize exemplary performance are acceptable.

    Enabling Policy: Office of Student Achievement Code: GBA (4) Chapter 160-3-1-.01

    Single state-wide accountability system (SSAS)

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-38 Awards will be provided to the schools that the director of the Office of Student Achievement determines have demonstrated the greatest improvement in achieving the education goals of improved student achievement and improved school completion. Awards will be provided to each school that is identified by the director for performance on either or both excellence in student achievement and progress on student achievement.

    Unless otherwise noted, Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions No information found.
    Other Stakeholders No information found.
    Program Funding
    Cost No information found.
    Funding Salary increases

    Upon determination of shortages each year, the board shall request funds from the general assembly sufficient to provide for salary increases. Funding shall be based on the number of eligible positions identified for the previous school year. Upon receiving three such salary increases, a teacher shall become ineligible for additional salary increases under this section.

    Five percent increase

    No information found, however since it is salary-related, funds are most likely appropriated by the general assembly.

    Career Ladder

    The board shall submit its policies and guidelines pertaining to the implementation of career ladder programs to the general assembly for review prior to submitting a request for funds to grant salary supplements under this program. The board shall grant sufficient funds to each local unit of administration to pay the salary supplements of all personnel awarded supplements under the career ladder programs, subject to appropriation by the general assembly.

    Pay-for-performance for rewarding group activity

    The state board of education shall submit a proposal for funding this pay-for-performance program for rewarding group productivity each year with its budget request. Awards made under this program are subject to appropriation by the general assembly.

    Single state-wide accountability system (SSAS)

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-38 Funding is subject to appropriation by the general assembly or as otherwise may be provided.

    O.C.G.A. §20-14-39 The financial award system may be funded by donations, grants or appropriation by the general assembly or as otherwise provided. The state board of education may solicit and receive grants and donations for the purpose of making awards under this section.

    Enabling policy: O.C.G.A. §20-2 and O.C.G.A. §20-14

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes No information found.

    Hawaii : Felix Response Plan -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level The Felix Response Plan (FRP) Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive and the Felix Response Plan (FRP) Return to Special Education Incentive for 2006-2007 School Year is a state level program.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Status Incentives are available for the 2006-2007 school year and will be offered during the life of the Felix Consent Decree.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Program Description The Felix Response Plan was implemented by Senate Bill 1303 in 2001 stemming from a federal lawsuit against the state of Hawaii. The bill requires the department of education to ensure that appropriate services are provided to eligible children with disabilities.

    Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive:

    Qualified Certificated employees working in the geographically hard-to-fill areas of Moloka'i, Lana'i, Hana, Ka`u, and Kohala will be eligible for this incentive. Teachers must complete one year of satisfactory service as a licensed teacher to earn this incentive. The money will be paid only at the end of one year of satisfactory service as a licensed teacher and will not be pro rated. Exception: If a teacher serves one semester in a hard-to-fill school and is subsequently staff reduced and willing to coontinue in another hard-to-fill school for the second semester, but no placement is available, the amount may be pro rated. However, if a placement in another hard-to-fill school is available and the teacher refuses the placement, the teacher is ineligible for any part of the incentive.

    Return to Special Education Incentive:

    This incentive is offered to dual licensed Special Education teachers, currently employed by the state department of education, who return to a Special Education classroom position anywhere in the state, for a period of three years. Teachers must sign a commitment to return to a Special Education classroom position for a full three years.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Other Programs No information found.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive:

    Qualified Certificated employees working in the geographically hard-to-fill areas of Moloka'i, Lana'i, Hana, Ka`u, and Kohala will be eligible for this incentive. Teachers must complete one year of satisfactory service as a licensed teacher to earn this incentive. The money will be paid only at the end of one year of satisfactory service as a licensed teacher and will not be pro rated. Exception: If a teacher serves one semester in a hard-to-fill school and is subsequently staff reduced and willing to coontinue in another hard-to-fill school for the second semester, but no placement is available, the amount may be pro rated. However, if a placement in another hard-to-fill school is available and the teacher refuses the placement, the teacher is ineligible for any part of the incentive.

    Return to Special Education Incentive:

    This incentive is offered to dual licensed Special Education teachers, currently employed by the state department of education, who return to a Special Education classroom position anywhere in the state, for a period of three years. Teachers must sign a commitment to return to a Special Education classroom position for a full three years.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive:

    The incentive is per year for a maximum of three years and will be paid as a lump sum and applied toward a teacher’s retirement benefits.

    Return to Special Education Incentive:

    The incentive is per year and is conditional upon satisfactory teacher performance. It is for a period of three years. The amount will be paid in a lump sum at the end of a full year of satisfactory service and will be paid as a differential and applied toward a teacher’s retirement benefits.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Incentives Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive:

    The incentive is $3,000 per year for a maximum of three years and will be paid as a lump sum and applied to a teacher’s retirement benefits.

    Return to Special Education Incentive:

    The incentive is $10,000 and is pro rated as follows: $3,000 after the first year, $3,000 after the second year and $4,000 after the third year. The pro rated amount will be paid in a lump sum at the end of a full year, paid as a differential and applied toward a teacher’s retirement benefits.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Incentive Recipients Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive:

    The incentive applies to licensed classroom teachers, including all licensed special education or general education classroom teachers. Teachers on probationary status are also eligible. Licensed support personnel, including counselors, registrars, librarians, student services coordinators, student activities coordinators and IRA teachers who are licensed teachers are also eligible.

    Teachers on Code W status or Code 5 status are ineligible, but under certain conditions may be paid retroactively. Resource Teachers are also ineligible.

    Return to Special Education Incentive:

    Dual licensed Special Education teachers, currently employed by the department of education who return to a Special Education classroom position anywhere in the state are eligible.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Hard-to-Fill Location Incentive:

    Teachers must complete one year of satisfactory service as a licensed teacher to earn the incentive and working in geographically hard-to-fill areas of Moloka'i, Lana'i, Hana, Ka`u, and Kohala.

    Return to Special Education Incentive:

    The department makes the sole determination on the suitability and selection of a returning teacher.

    The following basic guidelines for teachers must be with the Hawaii Department of Education and are as follows:

    • Dual certification
    • Teaching in Special Education
    • Transferred to Regular Education for two years or more
    • Returned to a Special Education position for a period of three years.
    Incentives are conditional upon satisfactory teacher performance.

    Source: Hawaii Department of Education Office of Human Resources

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions No information found.
    Other Stakeholders No information found.
    Program Funding
    Cost No information found.
    Funding No information found.
    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes No information found.

    Mississippi : Mississippi Performance-Based Pay (MPBP) Plan -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    The Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602) includes the establishment of a state level Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP) plan to reward licensed education personnel at schools showing improvement in student test scores.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Status Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    Effective July 1, 2007, if funds are available, the legislature may authorize funds for additional base compensation for teachers employed in a public school district located in a geographic area of the state designated as a critical teacher shortage area by the state board of education.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Program Description Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    The Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP) plan rewards certified teachers, administrators and nonlicensed personnel at individual schools showing improvement in test scores. The MPBP plan shall be developed by the state department of education based on the following criteria:

    • The plan shall utilize only existing standards of accreditation and assessment as established by the board of education.
    • The program shall be designed to calculate each school’s performance as determined by the school’s increase in scores from the prior school year. The program shall be based on a standardized scores rating where all levels of schools can be judged in a statistically fair and reasonable way upon implementation. At the end of the year, after all student achievement scores have been standardized, the state department of education shall implement the MPBP plan.
    • Individual schools shall submit a plan to the local school educational authority to be approved before the beginning of each school year beginning July 1, 2008. the plan shall include, but not be limited to, how all teachers, regardless of subject area, and administrators will be responsible for improving student achievement for their individual school.
    The state board of education shall develop the processes and procedures for designating schools eligible to participate in the MPBP. State assessment results, growth in student achievement at individual schools and other measures deemed appropriate in designating successful student achievement shall be used in establishing MPBP criteria.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Other Programs No information found.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    The Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602) includes the establishment of a state level Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP) plan to reward licensed education personnel at schools showing improvement in student test scores.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    The plan shall be designed to calculate each school’s performance as determined by the school’s increase in scores from the prior school year. The program shall be based on a standardized scores rating where all levels of schools can be judged in a statistically fair and reasonable way upon implementation.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Incentives Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    If after fully funding the Mississippi Adequate Education Program (MAEP) and if funds are available, the state may provide monies from state funds to school districts for additional base compensation for teachers employed in a public school district located in a geographic area of the state designated as a critical teacher shortage area.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Incentive Recipients Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    Certified teachers, administrators and nonlicensed personnel at individual schools showing improvement in student test scores.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    The plan shall utilize only existing standards of accreditation and assessment as established by the state board of education. The board shall develop processes and procedures for designing schools eligible to participate. State assessment results, growth in student achievement at individual schools and other measures deemed appropriate in designating successful student achievement shall be used in establishing program criteria.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Other Stakeholders Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Program Funding
    Cost Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Funding Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)

    The legislature may authorize funds if funds are available. Only after fully funding the Mississippi Adequate Education Program (MAEP) and if funds are available, the state may provide monies from state funds to school districts.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP)The Mississippi Performance Based Pay (MPBP) plan goes into effect July 1, 2007 and there is currently no data or information available.

    Enabling Policy: Mississippi Reform Act of 2006 (Senate Bill 2602)


    New York : Teachers of Tomorrow Recruitment and Retention Program -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    Teachers of Tomorrow teacher recruitment and retention program is a state level program.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Status New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    Program is ongoing.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Program Description New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    The Teachers of Tomorrow program was established under an amendment to the Education Law, Chapter 62 of the Laws of 2000 to assist school districts in the recruitment, retention and certification activities necessary to increase the supply of qualified teachers in school districts experiencing a teacher shortage or subject shortage, especially those schools with Schools Under Registration Review (SURR) and low performing schools.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Other Programs There are five other grants available under the Teachers of Tomorrow Program:
    • Summer in the City Internship Program
    • New York State Master Teacher Program
    • Teacher Recruitment Tuition Reimbursement Program
    • Science and Mathematics Tuition Reimbursement Program
    • Summer Teacher Training Program.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    The Teachers of Tomorrow program was established under an amendment to the Education Law, Chapter 62 of the Laws of 2000 to assist school districts in the recruitment, retention and certification activities necessary to increase the supply of qualified teachers in school districts experiencing a teacher shortage or subject shortage, especially those schools with Schools Under Registration Review (SURR) and low performing schools.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    The purpose of the program is to provide incentives to teachers employed for the first time in a public school district. Awards are provided per year and are renewable for three additional years. The awards are in addition to and not part of the teacher’s base pay.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Incentives New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    The teacher shall receive $3,400 per year and is renewable for three additional years. Maximum cumulative award total is $13,600.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Incentive Recipients New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    School districts may apply for these awards to provide funds for teachers who:

    • Have initial, provisional, permanent or professional certification to teach in New York state
    • Agree to a service obligation of one year of service in a teacher shortage areas as a condition of receiving an award, and
    • Are employed for the first time as a teacher in the school district.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Other Stakeholders New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Program Funding
    Cost New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    Thirty-eight projects were funded during the 2000, 2006 funding cycle. The allocation for these grants for the 2000-2002 was $25 million. In 2003-2005 the allocation was $20 million. The allocation for grants for the 2006-2007 program is $25 million.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Funding New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    Grants shall be made to school districts for teacher recruitment, retention and certification activities and shall be awarded to school districts, within the limits of funds appropriated therefore, through a competitive process that takes into consideration several issues. Not more than 60 percent of the funds allocated shall be made available to any one school district. State funds shall not supplant local funds currently used for similar purposes. School districts awarded funds must maintain local efforts related to the recruitment or retention of teachers currently in place at a level equivalent to that base year, or must match the state grant funds. Applications by a school district for funding shall be filed with the commissioner by June 1st of the base year and shall be notified by June 30th of the same year.

    Annual awards from state and local funds shall be paid by the board of education to the award recipient.

    Continuation of the program is dependent on legislative support.

    Enabling Policy: §3612

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes New York State Education Department Teachers of Tomorrow Program

    No information found.

    Enabling Policy: §3612


    North Carolina : Guilford Mission Possible -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Mission Possible

    Mission Possible is a district level program for Guilford County Schools in North Carolina.

    Status Mission Possible

    Guilford County Schools introduced the Mission Possible plan for the 2006-2007 school year. The program will expand to an additional seven schools using TIF funds granted in November 2006.

    Program Description Mission Possible

    GCS Mission Possible is a teacher incentive program designed to attract and retain teachers for underserved schools and subject areas and to reward teachers for outstanding results. It is a comprehensive support program for teachers in selected schools focusing on high quality staff development and smaller class sizes. GCS Mission Possible schools aim to be professional learning communities with supportive leaders and collaborative work environments. The program includes: 1.) Professional Training, 2.) Recruitment and Retention Bonuses, and 3.) Performance Incentives. To receive bonuses, teachers must show student achievement by a certain margin on state achievement tests. The program also includes sanctions for weak teachers.

    Other Programs ABCs, Charlotte-Mecklenburg High School Challenge EOC Retention Program, Charlotte-Mecklenburg STAR Program and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Performance-Based Pay Pilot
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Description of Component Mission Possible

    GCS Mission Possible aims to reward math and reading teachers and principals at historically low-performing schools in the district.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Mission Possible

    The compensation structure includes 2 categories (in addition to required professional training) for which teachers can receive incentive bonuses. The recruitment/retention incentive category offers incentives for teachers who teach specific grade levels and subject areas. The performance incentive rewards Value Added Scores and AYP for the schools.

    Incentives Mission Possible

    Recruitment/Retention Incentives include:

    • $2,500 for K-2 classroom teachers
    • $2,500 for 3rd-8th grade classroom teachers who teach reading, language arts, or math
    • $9,000 for middle and high school math teachers
    • $10,000 for middle and high school Algebra I teachers
    • $5,000-$10,000 for school principals
    The Performance Incentives offer:
    • $2,500-$4,000 for qualifying Value Added Scores
    • $2,500-$5,000 for school AYP
    Incentive Recipients Mission Possible

    Teachers and principals who have been selected to work at the Mission Possible schools.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Mission Possible Student achievement test scores, value added scores and AYP are used for evaluation.
    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Mission Possible

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Mission Possible

    The Superintendent of Guilford County Schools is credited with the creation of Mission Possible.

    Program Funding
    Cost Mission Possible

    Approximately $10 million for incentive bonuses.

    Funding Mission Possible

    Action Greensboro and the federal Teacher Incentive Fund have provided the funding for the Mission Possible program.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Mission Possible

    No information found.


    North Carolina : Charlotte-Mecklenburg High School Challenge EOC Retention Program -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    High School Challenge EOC Retention Program is one of several district level incentive programs for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina. It is available at Garinger, West Charlotte, and West Mecklenburg High Schools.

    Status High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Currently, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools has 35 incentive programs which have been funded to attract administrators and other instructional personnel to targeted schools.

    Program Description High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    The High School Challenge EOC Retention Program aims to retain teachers demonstrating High Academic Change (High Growth) on EOC ("end of course") exams at Garinger, West Charlotte and West Mecklenburg High Schools.

    Other Programs ABCs, Guilford Mission Possible, Charlotte-Mecklenburg STAR Program and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Performance-Based Pay Pilot
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    The High School Challenge EOC Retention Program is an effort to recruit and retain well-qualified teachers in the district.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Successful participants in this program receive $5,000 each year. (The amount of each award will be pro-rated to the percent employment.)

    Incentives High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Successful participants in this program receive $5,000 each year. (The amount of each award will be pro-rated to the percent employment.) Teachers continue to be eligible for any individual performance based programs at the High School Challenge schools in addition to the ABC and Local Accountability incentives.

    Incentive Recipients High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    EOC teachers of record at Garinger, West Charlotte or West Mecklenburg who demonstrated individual High Academic Change.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Teachers are evaluated based on the results of the end-of-course exams.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    • Citizens’ Task Force on Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
    • State Board of Education Teacher Retention Task Force
    Program Funding
    Cost High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    No information found.

    Funding High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    Bonus programs are subject to annual legislative and budgetary determinations.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes High School Challenge EOC Retention Program

    According to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District, Teacher Retention has increased from 78.2% to 84.5% between 2000 and 2005. Teacher turnover has decreased from 21.8% in 2000 to 16.6% in 2005.


    Tennessee : Benwood Initiative -Local Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Benwood Initiative

    There are nine Hamilton County schools in Chattanooga Tennessee that participate in the Benwood Initiative Program.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Status Benwood Initiative

    The Benwood Initiative is an ongoing program that began in 2000.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Program Description Benwood Initiative

    In 2000, the Tennessee Institute of Public Policy issued a report that ranked the performance of all 1258 elementary and middle schools in the state. Of the 20 lowest-performing elementary schools, nine were in Hamilton County. No other school district in the state had more than four schools in the bottom 20.

    This information spurred a shocked and determined reaction from three key organizations in Hamilton County: the Benwood Foundation, the Public Education Foundation (PEF), and the Hamilton County Department of Education (HCDE). The three forged an alliance that created what would come to be known as the Benwood Initiative. The Benwood Foundation contributed $5 million, the PEF contributed $2.5 million, and HCDE contributed a great deal of strong leadership to turn these schools around.

    All nine of these low-performing schools were urban, poor, and largely minority. Teacher turnover rates were high; the faculties were made up of young, inexperienced, and, in some cases, marginal teachers. Student performance was abysmal. On average, only 12% of third-graders in these schools could read at or above grade level.

    The partners of the Benwood Initiative decided to focus their efforts on student literacy, with a primary strategy of building knowledge and skills among educators. They tackled district-level structures and policies that impeded reform and crafted a reform framework that continues to provide effective professional development for teachers and principals. The overarching goal was to have every third grader reading at or above grade level within five years.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Other Programs No other programs were researched.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Hard to staff school
  • High poverty / high needs schools
  • Urban Schools
  • Description of Component The Benwood Initiative specifically targets nine low performing, urban, poor, largely minority and hard-to-staff schools.
    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Benwood Initiative

    HOUSING INCENTIVE
    Benwood schools teachers have the opportunity to buy homes in nine central downtown neighborhoods through the Chattanooga Teacher Next Door Program. Teachers in the identified schools can receive a loan of up to $10,000. If they live in the homes for five years, the loan will be forgiven. A second mortgage of up to $20,000 can be applied to the down payment and closing costs.

    RETENTION BONUS
    An annual salary bonus of $5,000 for three years will be given to existing teachers with records of high performance. (A three-year TVAAS average of 115+ or a recommendation by the K-3 committee is required.)

    RECRUITMENT BONUS
    An annual salary bonus of $5,000 for three years will be given to recruited teachers with records of high performance. (A three-year TVAAS average of 115+ or a recommendation by the K-3 committee is required.)

    SALARY BONUS
    Principals at Benwood schools whose students achieve high performance are eligible for salary bonuses of $10,000. (Average TVAAS scores must meet or exceed 115.)

    TEAM BONUS
    If any of the high priority schools achieves an average minimum TVAAS score of 115, each teaching professional will receive a salary bonus of $1,000. If the schools achieve an average TVAAS score of 120 or higher, each teaching professional will receive a salary bonus of $2,000.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Incentives Benwood Initiative

    Types of Compensations Include:

    • Housing Incentives,
    • Recruitment Bonuses,
    • Retention Bonuses and
    • Salary Bonuses.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Incentive Recipients Benwood Initiative

    Highly Qualified teachers are actively recruited locally and from across the nation.

    Retention bonuses are for existing teachers with records of high performance. (A three-year TVAAS average of 115+ or a recommendation by the K-3 committee is required.)

    There is also a recruitment bonus for recruited teachers with records of high performance. (A three-year TVAAS average of 115+ or a recommendation by the K-3 committee is required.)

    There is a salary bonus for principals at Benwood schools whose students achieve high performance. (Average TVAAS scores must meet or exceed 115.)

    A Team Bonus is allocated if any of the high priority schools achieves an average minimum TVAAS score of 115 (each teaching professional will receive a salary bonus of $1,000), or if the schools achieve an average TVAAS score of 120 or higher (each teaching professional will receive a salary bonus of $2,000).

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Benwood Initiative

    RETENTION BONUS
    Teachers are evaluated through TVAAS scores and can receive a recommendation by the K-3 committee.

    RECRUITMENT BONUS
    Teachers are evaluated through TVAAS scores and can receive a recommendation by the K-3 committee.

    SALARY BONUS
    Principals at Benwood schools are evaluated through their average school TVAAS scores.

    TEAM BONUS
    High priority schools are evaluated by whether or not they meet (or exceed) certain TVAAS scores.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Benwood Initiative

    The Hamilton County Education Association (HCEA) went against typical union positions and agreed to allow faculty at struggling schools to be reconstituted, and bonuses to be paid to teachers to attract and retain teachers at those schools. Most importantly, The union agreed to change the hiring process to eliminate a seniority-driven domino effect which often left the urban schools with un-staffed classrooms on the first day of school.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Other Stakeholders Benwood Initiative

    Additional stakeholders include the Benwood Foundation, the Public Education Foundation(PEF), Hamilton County Department of Education (HCDE) and school principals.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Program Funding
    Cost Benwood Initiative

    A total of $7.5 million in grants was invested in the program in 2001.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Funding Benwood Initiative

    In 2001 a $5 million grant from the Benwood Foundation and a $2.5 million grant from the Public Education Foundation (PEF) provided resources to the following elementary schools: Clifton Hills, Calvin Donaldson, East Lake, East Side, Hardy, Hillcrest, Howard, Orchard Knob, Woodmore.

    The focus is on raising student achievement in these nine “high priority” elementary schools, and attracting quality teachers to these urban schools.

    Since then, the Hamilton County Commission dramatically increased funding for schools based on the progress of the school system since merger.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Benwood Initiative

    Students in the Benwood schools are making significant gains in achievement. The schools have become dynamic institutions whose teachers report high levels of job satisfaction. Teacher turnover rates have dropped, and principals receive many applicants for every job opening.

    The percentage of third graders scoring proficient or advanced in reading jumped from 53% in 2003 to 74% in 2005. One school’s third-grade reading scores rose from 41% proficient or advanced in 2003 to 84% in 2005. Another’s rose from 54% to 88% during the same period. The district average rose from 77% in 2003 to 89% in 2005.

    For more information on the outcomes and results, see the Chattanooga Tennessee Public Education Foundation Report, Lessons Learned, A Report on the Benwood Initiative.

    Source: Lessons Learned: A Report on the Benwood Initiative


    Texas : Aldine Independent School District (AISD) Performance Inentives -District Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    Aldine ISD Critical Needs Supplement and the Performance Pay Incentive are district programs in the Aldine Independent School District.

    Status Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    Aldine ISD began an incentive program in 1995 to reward school employees for helping improve student achievement. Both programs appear to be active.

    Program Description Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Fully certified teachers who teach in “Critical Need Areas” — including math, science, and reading in grades 7-12, and bilingual and special education at all levels — are eligible for annual supplements. These bonuses are all based on a 6 period day of teaching every period in the critical need area—if a teacher teaches a portion of their day in these subjects, the bonus is based on the proportion of the day in the critical needs subject area.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    Aldine ISD’s salary program has earned wide, well-deserved acclaim for linking bonuses to individual student and individual school success. Aldine’s Performance Incentives link bonuses to student attendance, teacher retention, percentage of students passing state assessments, and percentage of students scoring at a specific level of achievement gains on assessments. Teachers and other campus personnel who meet verifiable performance standards are eligible to receive incentives which are distributed within each school at the discretion of a campus steering committee.

    Other Programs Houston Independent School District and The Educator Excellence Awards Program.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Description of Component Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    The critical subject areas include bilingual, math/science/reading, special education, ESL, and Montessori.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    Not applicable.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers who are fully certified in the critical subject areas receive a yearly bonus for teaching:

    • Bilingual
    • 7th-12th Math, Science and Reading
    • Special Education (all levels)
    • ESL (all levels)
    • Montessori
    Performance Pay Incentive
    Bonuses are based on:
    • Student attendance
    • teacher retention
    • Percentage of students passing state assessments
    • Percentage of students scoring at a specific level of achievement gains on assessments
    Incentives Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers receive the following yearly bonuses:

    • Bilingual= $4,000/ yr
    • 7th-12th Math, Science and Reading= $3,000/ yr
    • Special Education (all levels)= $3,000/ yr
    • ESL (all levels)= $2,000/yr
    • Montessori= $1,500/yr
    Performance Pay Incentive
    Awards to schools typically range from $80,000 to $120,000, depending on the size of the school. Although each case is different, a recognized elementary school principal may receive an award of $7,000; an assistant principal, $4,500; and teachers, from $500 to $1,000. A principal of a large, recognized high school may receive $18,000; assistant principals, $9,000. Teachers are eligible to receive incentives between $500 and $1,500.
    Incentive Recipients Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers who teach critical subjects.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    Schools receive awards which are given to principals, teachers and other campus personnel who meet the performance standards.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    Teachers must teach in a critical subject.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    The Texas Education Agency rates the district based on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test results as well as other verifiable performance standards.

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    No information found.

    Program Funding
    Cost Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    No information found.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    $4.5 million for the 2005-06 school year

    Funding Aldine Independent School District Critical Needs Supplement and Performance Pay Incentive

    The funding comes primarily from the district’s general fund, but the district also uses some Title I money to pay bonuses earned by teachers working in schools that receive Title I funds.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Aldine Independent School District

    Critical Needs Supplement
    No information found.

    Performance Pay Incentive
    In 1995, TEA gave the district an “Accredited” rating, the minimum acceptable rating at that time. By contrast, from 1997 to 2002,following the implementation of the incentive program and other initiatives designed to improve student performance,the district has held a “Recognized” accountability rating.


    Texas : Educator Excellence Awards -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    This is a state level program.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Status The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    The enabling legislation, Texas HB1 (Education Reform Act), was signed by Governor Perry on May 31, 2006.

    Texas HB1 (Education Reform Act) amends the Education Code, Chapter 21, Subchapters N and O.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Program Description The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    The Educator Excellence Awards Program provides grants to school districts for the purpose of providing incentive payments to employees under the terms of locally developed awards plans approved by the commissioner. The goal of both programs is to reward teachers who have a positive impact on improving student achievement.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Other Programs Houston Independent School District and Aldine ISD Performance Incentives.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff subject
  • Description of Component The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    An eligible campus may also consider a classroom teacher's assignment to teach a subject that is experiencing a critical shortage of teachers or a high teacher turnover rate as well as his/her demonstration of ongoing initiative, commitment, professionalism, and involvement in an activity that directly results in improved student achievement.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    Incentive payments and award payments for individual teachers that are based on student learning gains and collaboration with other faculty and staff resulting in overall student achievement. Teachers serving in critical shortage areas and hard to staff schools can also be awarded incentives.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Incentives The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    An eligible campus must submit to the Texas Education Agency for approval a campus incentive plan that is designed to reward teachers who have a positive impact on improving student achievement. In distributing incentive payments to classroom teachers, an eligible campus may distribute an incentive payment only to a classroom teacher who:

    • Demonstrates success in improving student achievement using objective, quantifiable measures, such as local benchmarking systems, portfolio assessments, end-of-course assessments, and value-added assessments; and
    • Successfully collaborates with other faculty and with staff in a manner that contributes to improving overall student achievement at the campus.
    An eligible campus may also consider a classroom teacher's assignment to teach a subject that is experiencing a critical shortage of teachers or a high teacher turnover rate as well as his/her demonstration of ongoing initiative, commitment, professionalism, and involvement in an activity that directly results in improved student achievement.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Incentive Recipients The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    Individual teachers receive incentives.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    No information found at this time.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    No information found at this time.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Other Stakeholders The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    Other stakeholders include legislators and school districts.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Program Funding
    Cost The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    Grants from funds appropriated for the program shall be awarded beginning with the 2006-2007 school year and may not exceed $100 million in the 2006-2007 school year except as expressly authorized by the General Appropriations Act or other law. State cost in fiscal year 2008 is estimated at $261 million in general revenue, increasing to $328 million by fiscal year 2011.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Funding The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    Each state fiscal year, the commissioner shall deposit the sum of $1,000 multiplied by the number of classroom teachers in this state to the credit of the educator excellence fund in the general revenue fund. Each state fiscal year, the agency shall use:

    1. Not more than $100 million of the funds in the educator excellence fund to provide grant awards under the awards for student achievement program; and
    2. Any remaining funds in the educator excellence fund to provide a qualifying school district a grant in an amount determined by:
      • Dividing the amount of remaining money available for distribution in the educator excellence fund by the total number of students in average daily attendance in qualifying districts for that fiscal year; and
      • Multiplying the amount determined under Paragraph (A) by the number of students in average daily attendance in the district.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes The Educator Excellence Awards Program

    The program is in the beginning stages of implementation, so there is no available information on the results or outcomes at this time.

    Enabling Policy: Texas HB1


    Virginia : Incentives for Hard-to-Staff Schools -State Level
    Program Statistics
    Name and Level Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools is a state level pilot program.

    Status Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    The two year pilot program began in 2004-2005 and continued through the 2005-2006 school year. The 2006-2007 school year was added, wherein one school division was funded with the stipulation that the state funds would be matched by the division. It is unclear whether the legislature will fund again for the 2007-2008 school year or if there are plans to implement the program across the state.

    Program Description Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    The purpose of the program is to improve student achievement in hard-to-staff schools by piloting a model program to attract and retain licensed, highly qualified and experienced teachers in hard-to-staff middle and high schools.

    The pilot program began in the fall of 2004 in Caroline County and Franklin City. During the pilot phase of the program, the commonwealth will provide a one-time hiring incentive of $15,000 to teachers who meet the eligibility criteria and who agree to move to a hard-to-staff middle or high school in one of the two participating school divisions. The relocating teachers must agree to teach in the hard-to-staff school for at least three years and participate in training during the first year of the pilot program in a formal support network during year two. The state will provide $500 stipends during both years of the pilot to cover expenses related to training and professional development to meet the challenges of working in a hard-to-staff school.

    Highly qualified teachers already teaching in the participating schools will receive annual $3,000 bonuses and $500 stipends for training and professional development as incentives to stay. All other teachers in the schools receive a $500 stipend for participating in training and benefit from the finding provided to the school by the state. Teachers also receive first priority to receive finds from the state to assist in earning national recognition.

    In year one of the pilot, the entire faculty and administration receive training to help them meet the challenges of working in a hard-to-staff school Participating schools receive base funding of $150 per student and may be used at the discretion of the school for various projects.

    In year two of the pilot, the entire faculty and administration benefit from a support program to help them meet the challenges of working in a hard-to-staff school. Schools that demonstrate increased student achievement as evidenced by at least a ten percent reduction in the failure rate from the previous year on Standard of Learning tests will receive base funding of $200 per student. These funds may be used at the discretion of the school in ways similar to those described above. However, at least 50 percent of the funds must be used as salary incentives for all faulty members of the school.

    Other Programs No information found.
    Hard-to-Staff, High Needs, At-Risk Component
    Program Target Components
  • Hard to staff school
  • Description of Component Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    The pilot program began in the fall of 2004 in Caroline County and Franklin City. During the pilot phase of the program, the commonwealth will provide a one-time hiring incentive of $15,000 to teachers who meet the eligibility criteria and who agree to move to a hard-to-staff middle or high school in one of the two participating school divisions. The relocating teachers must agree to teach in the hard-to-staff school for at least three years and participate in training during the first year of the pilot program in a formal support network during year two.

    Incentive Structure
    Compensation Structure Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    For the first year, a one time hiring incentive, an additional annual bonus and a stipend for training are available to teachers. Participating schools receive base finding per student.

    For the second year, an annual bonus and a stipend for participating in the support network are available to teachers. Schools that demonstrate increased student achievement receive funds based on the number of students in the school and are paid out per student.

    Incentives Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    For the first year, a one time hiring incentive of $15,000 for new teachers. An additional annual bonus of $3,000 and a $500 stipend are available to new teachers and eligible teachers who already teach at the school. Participating schools receive base funding of $150 per student.

    For the second year, an annual bonus of $3,000 and a $500 stipend are available to teachers and participating schools receive base funding of $200 per student.

    Incentive Recipients Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    Recipients include new and existing eligible teachers and participating schools.

    Methods of Evaluation
    Method of Evaluation Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    Candidates must satisfy three criteria, including documented evidence of average or better student performance in the teaching area consistent with significant improvement in student achievement, above average or better performance evaluations supported by outstanding classroom observation reports for the last three consecutive years, and letters of outstanding recommendations. The documented evidence of average or better student performance is demonstrated by, but not limited to the following:

    • Performance data for their students that meet or exceed adequate yearly progress measures, accreditation benchmarks or statewide averages on other student achievement measures, or that demonstrate student performance growth on such measures
    • Student performance on division wide assessments developed or selected by the school division
    • Student performance on pre- and post-tests approved by the school division
    • Student performance on standardized or other nationally administered tests
    • Student competency records in Career and Technical Education (CTE)
    • Numbers/percentages of students earning licenses in a content area
    • Evidence of how instruction in the content area contributed to success on SOL tests
    • Number/percentages of students taking and passing Advanced Placement exams, dual enrollment courses, International Baccalaureate exams, etc.
    • Evidence of student performance and success in increasingly complex visual arts, performing arts or practical arts skills
    • Number/percentages of students eligible for national honor society for specific content areas
    • Presidential physical fitness results and awards
    • Other performance-based measures as approved by the school division.
    Stakeholder Involvement
    Teachers and Teacher's Unions Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    No information found.

    Other Stakeholders Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    No information found.

    Program Funding
    Cost Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    No information found.

    Funding Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    The pilot was funded with Title II federal funds for the first two years. In the third year, the general assembly provided partial funding with the stipulation that the local division match the state funds. Only one of the two school divisions opted to participate in this the third year.

    Results and Outcomes
    Results and Outcomes Model Incentive Program to Attract and Retain Teachers in Virginia’s Hard-to-Staff Schools

    After the first year of the pilot, the program was modified and expanded to include three additional school divisions. The general assembly funded only one of these divisions and these funds were cut. Only enough funds were allocated for the remaining division to provide the hiring incentives and the bonus for existing teachers.

    The pilot program was expanded to include a third year wherein the general assembly provided partial funds with the stipulation that the local division match the state funds. One of the two original schools opted to participate.

    It is unknown whether the program will be funded for an additional year and unknown whether it will be implemented across the state.




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