Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
P-16/P-20 Councils: Membership

An average of 22 members serve on P-16/P-20 councils in the states, with membership ranging from five members in Missouri to 52 members in California. In addition to the K-12 and postsecondary representatives serving on every council:

  • Eighteen councils have explicit early learning representatives
  • Thirty-two councils include representatives of business and labor (including cabinet-level economic development positions)
  • Nineteen councils include legislators
  • Eight councils include governors, with an additional 19 councils including the governor's representative
  • Nineteen councils include "other" representatives, including members of the foundation community, district- and state-level education organizations, tribal representatives, and others.
  • Nine councils include both voting and nonvoting (ex officio) members.

Why does it matter?

  • Broad-based participation inclusive of early learning, government, business, and other stakeholders helps states reach consensus among all key players impacted by P-16 reform and ensures that recommendations made by the council are heard by the appropriate policymaking authority (state board, commission for higher education, university trustees, legislature, governor, etc.).
  • Inclusion of top lawmakers can help avoid the development of "parallel tracks" in the solving of education alignment issues in a state.
  • The governor's presence helps set the tone for the importance of the council's work.
  • Having members with broad authority in their own agency to make changes increases the chances of real change in agencies that members represent.

Sources for all data points are accessible through this link.

Methodology: ECS performed an initial search of statutes, regulations and executive orders. However, because many P-16 and P-20 councils are established independently of these means, ECS conducted interviews with and had all data verified by at least one contact in the state (typically a P-16 or P-20 council member or staff member supporting the council).

Last update: May 28, 2008

This database was compiled by Jennifer Dounay, project manager, ECS High School Policy Center. For questions, additions or corrections: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.

Membership
Arizona

All members are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the governor. As of May 2008, the council includes 36 voting members. As established in the executive order, membership, at a minimum, must include the following:

Early Learning (Min. 3):
Arizona Early Childhood Development and Health Board (one member)
At least two representatives of the early childhood education community

K-12 Education (Min. 8):
Superintendent of Public Instruction or his designee
At least two career and technical education representatives
At least four K-12 representatives (representing a charter school, middle/junior high school, high school, and classroom teacher)
State board of education (one member)
A representative actively engaged in high school dropout prevention programs or policy
A student representing a high school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
At least three locally elected officials, one of which must be a school board member (also listed under "Government" below)

Postsecondary (Min. 9):
Arizona Board of Regents (one member)
Presidents of the three state universities
No more than four community college representatives (with at least two representing rural community colleges)
A representative of a four-year private postsecondary institution
Student representative of a high school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "K-12" above)

Government (Min. 3):
Governor
At least three locally elected officials, one of which must be a school board member (also listed under "K-12" above)

Business (Min. 8):
The public, including but not limited to representatives of parent groups, business, industry and philanthropic organizations (at least eight members) (also listed under "Other" below)
Governor's Council on Workforce Policy (one representative)
Arizona Economic Resources Organization (AERO) (one representative)

Other (Min. 1):
The public, including but not limited to representatives of parent groups, business, industry and philanthropic organizations (at least eight members) (also listed under "Business" above)
A tribal representative

Ex officio members (Max. 4):
Legislature (Not more than four members)

Arkansas As established in statute, the 19 members of the commission include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 19):

Early Learning (1):
Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education, Department of Human Services (director or designee)

K-12 Education (6):
Commissioner of Education
Public school administrator
Public school teacher
Arkansas Education Association (member)
Arkansas Association of Educational Administrators (member)
Arkansas School Boards Association (member)

Postsecondary (7):
Director of the Department of Higher Education
President or chancellor of a four-year university
President or chancellor of a two-year college or two-year branch of a four-year university
Member of the board of trustees of a four-year university or system of colleges and universities
Member of the board of trustees of a two-year college or branch
Vice President for Agriculture, University of Arkansas System (also listed under "business" below)
Representative of a predominantly black college or university

Government (1):
Governor or designee
Note: While no legislators serve on the commission, the members representing the Arkansas Education Association, the Arkansas Association of Educational Administrators the Arkansas School Boards Association and a predominantly black college or university must be appointed by legislative leadership from a slate of candidates.

Business (3):
Department of Workforce Education (director)
Arkansas Economic Development Commission (director)
Vice President for Agriculture, University of Arkansas System (also listed under "postsecondary" above)

Other (2):
Arkansas Science and Technology Authority (president)
Arkansas Department of Information Systems (director or designee)
California As of January 24, 2008, the 52 members include the following:

Early Learning:
Preschool California (president)
Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California, Berkeley (director)

K-12 Education:
California State Board of Education (former board member)
California State Parent Teacher Association (president-elect)
California School Boards Association (executive director)
California School Employees Association (member, board of directors)
California Teachers Association (legislative advocate)
California Charter Schools Association (senior vice president)
California Alliance of African American Educators (president)
Claremont Unified School District (director, secondary education)
Garden Grove Unified School District (board member)
Los Angeles Unified School District, Local District 4 (superintendent)
Oak Grove School District, San Jose (superintendent)
Oak Middle School, Los Alamitos Unified School District (teacher)
Montebello Unified School District (teacher)
California GEAR UP (director)
Sacramento County Office of Education (assistant superintendent)
San Bernardino City Unified School District (administrator of program improvement)
San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools (superintendent)
San Francisco Unified School District (superintendent)
San Francisco Education Fund (member, board of directors)
San Mateo Union High School District (teacher)
Alpaugh Unified School District, Tulare County (superintendent)
W.C. Carlé Continuation High School, Konocti Unified School District (teacher of the year)

Postsecondary:
Butte College (teacher)
California Community Colleges (vice chancellor, academic affairs)
California State University, Office of the Chancellor (assistant vice chancellor)
California State University, Bakersfield (president)
California State University, Fresno (student)
California State University, Los Angeles (trustee professor)
Sacramento City College (dean, learning resources division)
San Diego State University (professor, assistant to the president)
University of California, Office of the President (provost and executive vice president)
University of California (regent)
University of California, Davis (dean, school of education)

Government:
California State Assembly (speaker)
California State Senate (majority leader)

Business:
Apple, Inc. (strategic relations manager)
California Manufacturers and Technology Association (president)
IBM Global Education Industry (vice president)
Silicon Valley Leadership Group (president and CEO)
Washington Mutual (vice president, corporate and employee giving)

Other:
ARCHES (executive director)
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (senior policy officer for education)
Cambridge Education (senior vice president)
Compton Adult School (director)
Education Trust-West (superintendent in residence)
James Irvine Foundation (director of youth programs)
Springboard Schools (educational coach/consultant)
Project Lead the Way, Inc. (director, state and corporate relations)
Great Schools, Inc. (president and CEO)
Silver Giving Foundation (president)
Colorado All members are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the governor (executive order does not specify minimum or maximum number of members, or role groups from which members must be selected). As of April 2008, the 31 voting members include the following:

Early Learning:
Mile High Montessori (executive director)

K-12 Education:
Kit Carson School District (superintendent)
Mesa Valley County 51 School District (superintendent)
Martin Luther King, Jr. Early College (principal)
Cherry Creek School District (superintendent)
Littleton Public Schools (assistant superintendent)
Denver Public Schools (board member)
Boulder Valley Schools (teacher)
Colorado Education Association (past president)
Adams 12 School District (counselor)
Colorado Department of Education (director, English Language Acquisition Unit)
The Classical Academy (president)
Colorado Assocation for Career and Technical Education (executive director)
North Conejos School District (board president)
Colorado Statewide Parent Coalition (executive director)

Postsecondary:
Colorado State University at Pueblo (president)
Metropolitan State College Board of Trustees (chair of board of trustees)
University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center (associate vice chancellor of student services)
Western State College (provost)
Community College of Aurora (president)
Platt College (president)
Fort Lewis College (professor - geology)
University of Colorado at Colorado Springs (professor - mathematics)
Colorado State University (assistant vice president, Student Success)
University of Denver (former chancellor)
University of Colorado at Boulder (dean)
University of Northern Colorado (dean)

Government:
Lieutenant govenor

Business:
A business representative will be appointed

Other:
Bonfils-Stanton Foundation (president)
Colorado Uplift (executive director)

Ex officio members:
Colorado Department of Education (commissioner)
Colorado State Board of Education (chair)
Colorado Commission on Higher Education (chair)
Colorado Department of Higher Education (executive director)

In addition, the council has five subcommittees, comprised of both voting members of the council as well as participants who have voting privileges on their respective subcommittees but not on the council as a whole. Subcommittee members who are not full P-20 council members include legislators, state board members and "invited advisors" representing various role groups, such as K-12 education, higher education, the foundation community and various local and state-level youth and education advocacy organizations around the state.
Connecticut In the process of being expanded
Delaware As established in statute, the 12 members include the following:

Early Learning:
Delaware Early Care and Education Council (chair)

K-12 Education:
Secretary of Public Education ( = Delaware chief state school officer)
State Board of Education (president)

Postsecondary:
Delaware State University (president)
Delaware Technical and Community College (president)
University if Delaware (president)
Wesley College (president)

Government:
Governor
House Education Committee (chair)
Senate Education Committee (chair)

Business:
Business Roundtable Education Committee (chair)
Delaware State Chamber of Commerce (president)
Georgia The 7 members of the alliance include:

Early Learning (1):
Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning (commissioner)

K-12 Education (2):
State Superintendent of Schools
Georgia Professional Standards Commission (executive director)

Postsecondary (3):
Chancellor of the University System of Georgia
Department of Technical and Adult Education (commissioner)
Georgia Student Finance Commission (president) and GA College 411

Government (1):
Governor's Office of Student Achievement (executive director)
Hawaii As of February 2008, the council includes 30 members, who are the head or designee of the following organizations:

Early Learning:
Good Beginnings Alliance
Hawai'i Association for the Education of Young Children
Kamehameha Schools (also represents K-12 education and "other" interests by virtue of community outreach services).

K-12 Education:
Hawai'i State Department of Education (HIDOE)
Hawai'i Association of Independent Schools (also represents postsecondary and Catholic schools)
Hawai'i Board of Education
Hawai'i Government Employees Association (bargaining agent for K-12 principals)
Hawai'i Parent, Teachers, Students Association
Hawai'i State Teachers Association
Hawai'i Teachers Standards Board
Joint Venture Education Forum
Kamehameha Schools (also represents early learning and "other" interests by virtue of community outreach services).

Postsecondary:
University of Hawai'i (UH), including

    • UH Board of Regents
    • UH College of Education
    • UH Professional Assembly (labor union for UH faculty)
    • UH System Academic Affairs (planning and policy office for 10-campus system)

Hawai'i Association of Independent Schools (also represents Catholic schools)

Government:
Governor's Office (policy analyst attends on the governor's behalf)
State House of Representatives (Chairs of K-12 and higher education committees)
State Senate Education Committees (Chairs of K-12 and higher education committees)
U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye's Office (Chief of staff attends on behalf of the state's senior U.S. senator)

Business:
Chamber of Commerce of Hawai'i
Hawai'i Business Roundtable
Pacific Resource Partnership (Nonprofit trust fund created in 1987 "to promote the benefits of union carpentry from unionized contractors") (language from 2005 P-20 strategic plan)

Other:
Hawaii Alliance for Arts Education
Kamehameha Schools (represents "other" interests by virtue of community outreach services).

Other council members can be recommended to the leadership team via the executive director.

Illinois As established in statute, the 27 voting members include the following:

Early Learning, K-12 and Postsecondary (6):
Six members representing pre-kindergarten through grade 20 teachers, community college and public university faculty.

K-12 Education (2):
Two members representing local school administrators and school board members

Postsecondary (3):
One member representing community colleges
One member representing four-year independent colleges and universities
One member representing public four-year universities

Government (6):
Govenor (or designee)
Four members of the General Assembly (one appointment each by speaker, house and senate minority leaders, senate president)
Representative of local government

Business (5):
Five members appointed by statewide business organizations and business trade associations

Other (5):
Education research expert

Representative of:
Civic leaders
Trade unions
Nonprofit organizations or foundations
Parents' organizations


Ex officio members (individual or his/her designee) (9):
State Superintendent of Education
Executive Director of the Board of Higher Education
President and CEO of Illinois Community College Board
Executive Director of the Illinois Student Assistance Commission
Co-chairpersons of the Illinois Workforce Investment Board
Director of Commerce and Economic Opportunity
Chairperson of the Illinois Early Learning Council
President of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy
Indiana Statute does not specify a minimum or maximum number of members. Statute does specify appointments are to be made jointly by the Governor and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and requires a balance of membership between business/community and K-12/higher education. (As of May 2008, there are 13 members each representing K-12/postsecondary and business/community, but the state superintendent is considered a "government" rather than "K-12" representative, which may give the appearance of an imbalance to external database users.) Additional appointments from the General Assembly are made by legislative leadership and require representation of both political parties.

Membership has ranged from 23-34 members. Lists of members going back to the Roundtable’s inception can be found at www.edroundtable.state.in.us (scroll to the bottom of Members Web page for previous years).

As of April 2008, the 33 voting roundtable members include the following:

K-12 and Postsecondary (15):
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Various members representing teachers, teacher unions, principals, superintendents, school business officials, local school boards, and public and independent universities

Government (5):

Governor
House Education Committee (chair and ranking minority member)
Senate Education Committee (chair and ranking minority member)

Business/Community (13):
Various members representing private business and industry, state business/manufacturing associations, local foundation, local government (mayors and city councils), the Catholic community, and youth-serving organizations.

Ex officio members:
Two members of the Indiana State Board of Education serve as non-voting members of the Roundtable.
Kansas As established in the executive order, the 14 voting members of the council include:

Early Learning (1):
Kansas Children's Cabinet

K-12 Education (6):
Kansas State Board of Education (2 members)

One representative from each of the following:
-Kansas Parent Teacher Association
-A Kansas teachers association
-United School Administrators of Kansas
-Kansas Association of School Boards

Postsecondary (3):
Kansas Board of Regents (2 members)
Kansas Association of Independent Colleges

Education and/or Business (4):
Four at-large governor appointees from the state's business and industry or education community

Ex officio members (7):
Secretary of Commerce
Chairs of house and senate education committees
Ranking minority members of house and senate education committees
Commissioner of Education
President/CEO of Kansas Board of Regents
Kentucky As of March 2008, the 18 members include the following:

Early Learning (1):
Director, Early Childhood Development, Kentucky Department of Education

K-12 Education (7):
Commissioner of Education
Kentucky Board of Education (3 members)
Education Professional Standards Board (2 members = chair and executive director)
Office of Career and Technical Education (executive director)

Postsecondary (5):
Council on Postsecondary Education (4 members = president and 3 CPE members)
Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (executive director)

Government (1):
Secretary, Education Cabinet

Business (2):
Department for Workforce Investment (commissioner)
Workforce Investment Board (a business and labor representative)

Other (2):
Kentucky Adult Education (vice president)
Representative of local P-16 councils
Louisiana Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: The 36 members of the commission include:

K-12 Education (14):
State Superintendent of Education
Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (2 members)
Two district superintendents (one rural, one urban)
Elementary, Middle and High School Principal of the Year
Elementary, Middle and High School Teacher of the Year
Personnel director
School board member
Topic specialist - K-12 education

Postsecondary (14):
Commissioner of Higher Education
Board of Regents (2 members)
Louisiana Community and Technical College System
University president
University provost
Three university deans
Two university faculty members
PK-16+ Coordinator
Pre-service teacher
Topic specialist - higher education

Government (3):
Governor's education policy advisor
Senate (President of the Senate's designee)
House education committee (chair)

Business/Community (5):
Five representatives of business and the community at large


High School Redesign Commission:
As provided in statute, the 42 members of the commission (effective with the enactment of 2008 H.B. 721) include:

K-12 Education (23):
State superintendent of education or designee
State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (four members)
2004 Louisiana High School Teacher and High School Principal of the Year
A recent public high school graduate

One representative from each of the following:
-Louisiana Federation of Teachers
-Louisiana Association of Educators
-Associated Professional Educators of Louisiana
-Louisiana Association of Special Education Administrators
-Louisiana Parent-Teacher Association
-Louisiana Nonpublic School Commission

Two representatives from each of the following:
-Louisiana Association of School Superintendents
-Louisiana Association of Principals
-Louisiana Association of School Executives

Four representatives of the Louisiana School Boards Association

Postsecondary (5):
Commissioner of higher education or designee
Board of Regents (chairman or designee)
University of Louisiana System (president or designee)
Louisiana Community and Technical College System (president or designee)
Dean of a college of education of a Louisiana public college or university

Government (3):
Govenor or designee
House and Senate education committee chairs or designees

Business (3):
Department of Labor (secretary or designee)
Louisiana Workforce Commission (chairman or designee)
Louisiana Task Force on Workforce Competitiveness (two members)

Business, Civic, Labor or Community (4):
Four representatives from business, civic, labor or community organizations

Other (3):
Office of Youth Development (deputy secretary or designee)
Adult Learning Task Force (two members)
Maine As established in the executive order, the 15 voting members of the advisory council include:

K-12 Education (3):
Commissioner of Education
State Board of Education (two members)

Postsecondary (6):
University of Maine System (chancellor)
University of Maine System Board of Trustees (chair or designee)
Maine Community College System (president)
Maine Community College System Board of Trustees (chair or designee)
Maine Maritime Academy (president)
Maine Maritime Academy Board of Trustees (chair or designee)

Government (1):
Legislative Youth Advisory Council (representative)

Business (4):
Four members of the business community

Other (1):
Maine Adult Education Association (representative)

Ex officio members (3):
Department of Administrative and Financial Services (commissioner)
Department of Labor (commissioner)
State Planning Office (director)
Maryland As established in the executive order, the 35 voting members of the council include the following:

Early Learning (1):
Expert in early childhood education

K-12 Education (7):
State Superintendent of Schools
State Board of Education (member)
Expert in career and technology education (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
Representative of:
-local superintendents
-local boards of education
-K-12 teachers
-K-12 principals

Postsecondary (14):
Secretary of Higher Education
Chancellor of the University System of Maryland
Chairman of the Maryland Higher Education Commission
Expert in career and technology education (also listed under "K-12" above)
Two representatives of community colleges
Two representatives of independent colleges or universities
Representative of public institutions of higher education outside the University System of Maryland
Representative of college or university deans with responsibility for a STEM discipline
Four representatives of the University System of Maryland

Government (1):
Governor or designee

Business (7):
Secretary of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
Secretary of Business and Economic Development
Chair and Executive Director of the Governor's Workforce Investment Board
Three representatives of the business community

Undefined (max. 6):
Up to six additional members appointed by the governor
Minnesota The 2007-2009 council membership includes 21 organizations, with each organization represented by one voting member (usually the organization's chief executive officer). An executive team of leaders from six organizations leads the council, under the auspices of the chair and vice chair.

K-12 Education:
Minnesota Association of Charter Schools
Minnesota Association of School Administrators
Minnesota Association of Secondary School Principals
Minnesota Department of Education
Minnesota Elementary School Principals Association
Minnesota Independent School Forum
Minnesota Parent Teacher Association
Minnesota School Boards Association

Postsecondary:
Minnesota Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
Minnesota Career College Association
Minnesota Office of Higher Education
Minnesota Private College Council
Minnesota State Colleges and Universities
University of Minnesota

Business:
Minnesota Business Partnership
Minnesota Chamber of Commerce

Other:
Citizens League 
Education Minnesota
Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota
Minnesota Council on Foundations
Minnesota Minority Education Partnership
Mississippi As of January 2008, the 12 members include the following:

K-12 Education:
Mississippi Department of Education (5 members = state superintendent, deputy superintendent, assistant superintendent for quality professionals and special schools, executive to the superintendent for instructional programs and services, executive to the superintendent for educational accountability)

Postsecondary:
Institutions of Higher Learning (4 members = commissioner of higher education, assistant commissioner for academic and student affairs, director of P-16 initiatives, assistant commissioner for community and junior college relations)
State Board for Community and Junior Colleges (3 members = executive director, associate executive director for programs, associate executive director–career and technical education)
Missouri K-12 Education:
Commissioner of Education
State Board of Education (President)

Postsecondary:
Commissioner of Higher Education
Coordinating Board for Higher Education (Chair)

Business:
Department of Economic Development (Director)
Montana As established in the board of education resolution, the workgroup's 9 voting members include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 9):

Early Learning (1):
Montana School for the Deaf and Blind (representative) (also listed under "K-12" below)

K-12 Education (3):
State Superintendent of Public Education (or designee)
Board of Public Education (representative)
Montana School for the Deaf and Blind (representative) (also listed under "Early Learning" above)

Postsecondary (2):
Commissioner of Higher Education (or designee)
Board of Regents (representative)

Government (1):
Governor or designee (designee is also a legislator and tribal member) (also listed under "Other" below)

Other (4):
Parent representative
Student representative
Tribal member (who is the governor's representative and a legislator) (also listed under "Government" above)
Student Assistance Foundation representative

Ex officio members (6): (or designee)
Director of Department of Public Health and Human Services
Commissioner of Labor and Industry
Director of Department of Commerce
Governor's Chief Business Development Officer
Governor's Budget Director
Governor's Chief Information Officer
Nebraska As of May 2008, the 35 members of the P-16 council's Steering Committee include:

Early Learning (2):
Nebraska Association for the Education of Young Children (executive director)
Department of Health and Human Services (CEO)

K-12 Education (10):
Commissioner of Education and Deputy Commissioner of Education
Nebraska State Board of Education (president)
Nebraska Council of School Administrators (executive director)
Nebraska State Education Association (executive director)
Nebraska Association of School Boards (executive director)
Nebraska PTA (legislative chair)
Omaha Archdiocese (superintendent of schools)
Lincoln Public Schools, NAACP Education Committee c/o Multicultural Administration (chair)
Representative of Nebraska Education Service Units

Postsecondary (8):
Chancellor of Nebraska State College System
University of Nebraska Board of Regents (chairman and member)
University of Nebraska (president and executive vice president/provost)
Nebraska Community College Association (executive director)
Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Nebraska (executive director)
Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education (executive director)

Government (4):
Governor's Policy Research Office (director)
Education Committee (chairperson and legal counsel)
State Budget Office (state budget administrator)

Business (7):
Department of Economic Development (director)
Nebraska Department of Labor (commissioner)
Nebraska Business-Higher Education Forum (chair)
Nebraska Chamber of Commerce and Industry (president)
Lincoln Chamber of Commerce (president)
Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce (president/CEO and vice president, education and workforce devt.)

Other (4):
EducationQuest Foundation (President/CEO)
Mexican American Commission (executive director)
Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs) (executive director)
NAACP- Lincoln (president)
Nevada As established in statute, the 11 voting members of the council include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 11):

K-12 Education (Min. 1)
A representative of K-12 education
A parent of a student in a public K-12 school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
Two additional members representing either K-12, postsecondary or private business (also listed under "Postsecondary" and "Business" below)

Postsecondary (Min. 1)
A representative of postsecondary education
A parent of a student in a public K-12 school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "K-12" above)
Two additional members representing either K-12, postsecondary or private business (also listed under "K-12" and "Business")

Government (2)
One member each of the House and Senate

Business (Min. 1)
A representative of private business
Two additional members representing either K-12, postsecondary or private business (also listed under "K-12" and "Postsecondary" above)

Other (2)
Two members of the general public
 

Ex officio members (2):
Nevada Superintendent of Public Instruction
Chancellor of the Nevada System of Higher Education
New Hampshire As established in the executive order, the 8 members of the council include:

K-12 Education (1):
Commissioner of Education

Postsecondary (4):
Chancellor of the University System of New Hampshire
New Hampshire Community Technical College System (chancellor)
New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission (executive director)
New Hampshire College and University Council (executive director)

Government (1):
Governor's designee

Business (2):
New Hampshire Workforce Opportunity Council (president)
A leader from the New Hampshire business community
North Carolina As established in statute, the 7 members of the education cabinet include:

K-12 Education (2):
State Superintendent of Public Instruction
State Board of Education (chairman)

Postsecondary (3):
University of North Carolina (president)
North Carolina Community Colleges System (president)
North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (president)

Government (2):
Governor
Secretary of Health and Human Services

As provided in statute, the cabinet may invite other representatives of education to participate in its deliberations as nonvoting members.
Ohio Eight members are identified in statute; the remainder are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the governor. As established in statute, the current 25 voting members include the following:

Early Learning:
Child Development Council of Franklin County, Inc. (president and CEO)

K-12 Education:
Superintendent of public instruction
Celina City Schools (representative of a comprehensive or compact career-technical school) (vocational director)
Chaminade Julienne High School (a chartered nonpublic school) (teacher)
Citizens Academy (community school/charter school) (executive director)
Miami Valley Career Technology Center (teacher)
Montgomery County Educational Service Center (community school/charter school) (JOB TITLE?)
St. Christopher School (a chartered nonpublic school) (learning disabilities tutor/guidance counselor)
SCOCA (South Central Ohio Computer Association) (distance learning coordinator)
State board of education (member)

Postsecondary:
Board of regents (chancellor)
Board of regents (member)
Notre Dame College (president)
Shawnee State University (president)

Government:
Governor
House Education Committee (chair)
House Education Committee (ranking minority member)
Senate Education Committee (chair)
Senate Education Committee (ranking minority member)

Business:
Department of development (director)
State workforce policy board (president, Lorain County Community College) (= Workforce Investment Act, or WIA)

Other:
Battelle for Kids (executive director)
Career center (teacher)
KnowledgeWorks Foundation (president and CEO)
Ohio College Access Network (president and CEO)

The governor's education policy advisor is not a voting member, but is the council's designated chairman.

Legislation also establishes a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subcommittee, comprised of the superintendent of public instruction, the chancellor of the Ohio board of regents, the director of development, and four members of the public. The members of the public are not at-large members of the partnership for continued learning.
Oklahoma As established in statute, the 22 members include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 22):
 
K-12 Education (14):
State Superintendent of Public Instruction
State Department of Career and Technology Education (director) (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
A superintendent of a technology center (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)

A member of statewide organizations representing:
-Rural schools
-Rural elementary schools
-Suburban schools
-Secondary school principals
-Parent-teacher organizations
-School administrators
-School board members

A representative of:
-A statewide federation representing teachers
-A statewide association representing professional educators
-A statewide association representing teachers
-Nonaffiliated teachers

Postsecondary (8):
State Superintendent of Public Instruction (superintendent is also a Regent for Higher Education)
Chancellor of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
State Department of Career and Technology Education (director) (also listed under "K-12" above)
Four faculty members from state system institutions with expertise in English, math, science and social studies
A superintendent of a technology center (also listed under "K-12" above)

Government (4):
State House of Representatives (Chair of common education committee and appointee of House minority leader)
State Senate (Chair of education committee and appointee of Senate minority leader)

Business (2):
Representative from Governor's Council on Workforce and Economic Development
Representative of a statewide coalition representing business and education

Statute also specifies that the state superintendent may appoint additional members.
Oregon The 18 members include all members of the two boards:

K-12 Education (7):
State Board of Education

Postsecondary (11):
State Board of Higher Education

There is also a working group that is a subset of the Joint Boards that consists of three members of each board.
Pennsylvania STEM: As of April 2008, the 35 members of the Leadership Team include:

Early Learning (1):
Departments of Public Welfare and Education (deputy secretary, Office of Child Development and Early Learning)

K-12 and Postsecondary (2):
State board of education (chair)
Lehigh Career and Technical Institute (executive director)

K-12 Education (6): 
Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Education
Pennsylvania State Education Association (president)
3 representatives of teachers and local superintendents

Postsecondary (7):
Chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education
Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania (president)
Delaware County Community College (president)
Montgomery County Community College (president)
Saint Francis University (president)
University of Pennsylvania (former dean) 
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology (provost and associate professor of management)

Government (5):
Governor's office
Senate education committee co-chairs
House education committee co-chairs

Business (9):
Department of Community and Economic Development (secretary and deputy secretary)
Pennsylvania Workforce Investment Board (executive director)
Pennsylvania Economic Development Association (president)
Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry (acting secretary)
Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Pennsylvania State Council (executive director)
3 representatives of private business

Other (5):
Department of Environmental Protection (president)
Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Inc. (president)
Team Pennsylvania Foundation (2 representatives)
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (doctor)

The council's work is also supported by a Design Team that includes diverse PK-20 representation from various state agencies, institutions of higher education, the state workforce investment board, business, foundations and non-profits.

PASSHE Regional Councils: Varies by council but include universities, public school and district leadership, businesses, community colleges, non–system institutions as well as other partners.
Rhode Island As established in 2005 and 2007 executive orders, the 10 members include the following:

K-12 Education:
Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education (chair) 
Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education

Postsecondary:
Board of Governors for Higher Education (chair)
Commissioner of Higher Education
Representative of independent higher education in Rhode Island (as of February 2008, this is a Johnson and Wales University representative; the institution chairing independent colleges and universities commission in a given year serves as the independent higher education representative on the PK-16 council)

Government:
Governor

Business:
Department of Labor and Training (director)
Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (executive director)
Rhode Island Economic Policy Council (chair)
Human Resources Investment Council (chair) (= chair of the governor's workforce board) (Workforce Investment Act, or WIA)
South Carolina

As established by statute, the 27 members of the council must include the following, who must represent the geographic regions of the state and be representative of the state’s ethnic, gender, rural and urban diversity:

K-12 Education (6):
State Superintendent of Education or his designee
A school district superintendent
A principal
A school guidance counselor
A teacher
A director of a career and technology center

Postsecondary (5):
South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (Executive Director or his designee)
State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education (Executive Director or his designee)
President or provost of a research university
President or provost of a four-year college or university
President of a technical college

Government (3):
Chairman of the Education Oversight Committee or his designee
House and Senate member

Business (13):
South Carolina Employment Security Commission (Executive Director or his designee)
Department of Commerce (Secretary or his designee)
South Carolina Chamber of Commerce (Executive Director or his designee)
Ten representatives of business, including at least one representative of small business

South Dakota As of April 2008, the 21 members include:

K-12 Education (3):
Secretary of Education
Board of Education (president and vice president)

Postsecondary (4):
South Dakota Board of Regents (Executive Director, plus board president and vice president)
Western Dakota Tech (two-year institution) (president)

Government (6):
Governor's Senior Policy Advisor
House and Senate Education Committee chairs
Senate Majority Leader and Speaker Pro Tempore
Representative

Business (8):
South Dakota Chamber of Commerce and Industry (president)
Seven business leaders representing varied workforce interests from across the state
Tennessee The nine members of the council include:

K-12 Education (2):
Commissioner of Education
Tennessee State Board of Education (executive director)

Postsecondary (4):
Tennesee Board of Regents (chancellor)
Tennessee Higher Education Commission (executive director)
Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association (president)
University of Tennessee (president)

Government (1):
Governor's Office (representative)

Business (2):
Tennessee Business Roundtable (executive director)
Tennessee Chamber of Commerce (president)
Texas Statute specifies five members of the P-16 council; however, while the executive director of the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is by statute a member, legislation later moved the SBEC's duties under the purview of the Texas Education Agency.

Statute also authorizes the co-chairs to "appoint three additional members who are education professionals, agency representatives, business representatives, or other members of the community." Such additional members "serve two-year terms expiring February 1 of each odd-numbered year." As of Feburary 6, 2008, membership includes:

K-12 Education:
Commissioner of Education (by statute)
Fort Worth Independent School District (superintendent) (term 2007-2009)

Postsecondary:
Commissioner of Higher Education (by statute)
Odessa College (president) (term 2007-2009)

Business:
Texas Workforce Commission (executive director) (by statute)
Maverick Engineering, Inc. (vice president, systems development) (term 2007-2009)

Other:
Commissioner of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (by statute)
Utah As of April 2008, the 15 members of the K-16 Alliance include:

K-12 and Postsecondary Education (3):
Three individuals serving on the board of regents and on the state board of education

K-12 Education (4):
State Superintendent of Public Instruction and Associate State Superintendent
State Board of Education (chair and vice chair)

Postsecondary (4):
Commissioner of Higher Education and Associate Commissioner
State Board of Regents (chair and vice chair)

Government (4):
Governor and Governor's Deputy for Education
Representative
Senator
Virginia As established by executive order, the 22 members of the council include:

Early Learning (1):
Preschool education representative

K-12 Education (2):
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Board of Education (president)

Postsecondary (5):
State Council of Higher Education (director plus chairman)
Virginia Community College System (chancellor)
Virginia Community College Board (president)
A representative of private colleges

Government (5):
Secretary of Education
House of Delegates (two members)
Senate (two members)

Business and Other (9):
Nine citizen members are to include educators, and business and community leaders

The govenor may appoint additional members at his discretion.
Washington As established in executive order, the 14 members include the following:

Early Learning:
Washington Learns Early Learning Council (chair)
Department of early learning (director)

K-12 Education:
Superintendent of public instruction
State board of education (chair)
Professional educator standards board (chair)

Postsecondary:
Council of Presidents (chair)
Higher education coordinating board (chair)
Independent Colleges of Washington (chair)
State board for community and technical colleges (chair)
Washington Association of Community and Technical Colleges (president)
Washington Learns Higher Education Advisory Committee (chair)
Workforce training and education coordinating board (chair)

Government:
Governor

Other:
Tribal Education Programs (chair) (representative of tribal education programs from a federally recognized tribe, appointed by the governor)

West Virginia As established in executive order, the 24 voting members of the cabinet include the following:

K-12 Education (7):
State Superintendent of Schools
West Virginia Center for Professional Development (CEO)
State Board of Education (member)
Three public school educators from different parts of state, representing elementary, middle and high school
Representative of nonpublic primary education

Postsecondary (5):
Chancellor for Higher Education
Chancellor for Community and Technical College Education
Higher Education Policy Commission (member)
Council for Community and Technical College Education (member)
Representative of a private college or university

Government (2):
First Lady
Secretary of the Department of Education and the Arts (a cabinet position)

Business (4):
West Virginia Development Office (executive director)
Workforce West Virginia (executive director)
A private sector leader
West Virginia Council for Community and Economic Development (member)

Business, Industry and Parents (5):
Five individuals representing business, industry and parents of West Virginia students

Other (1):
Bureau for Children and Families (commissioner)

Ex officio members (4):
Senate and House education committee chairs
House and Senate chairs of the joint commission on economic development
Wisconsin The 30 members include the following:

K-12 Education (10):
State Superintendent of Public Instruction
Cooperative Educational Service Agencies (chair)
Wisconsin Association of School Boards (executive director)
Wisconsin Association of School District Administrators (executive director)
Wisconsin Education Association Council (president)
Association of Wisconsin School Administrators (executive director)
Wisconsin Parent Teachers Associations (executive director)
Wisconsin AFL-CIO (president)
AFT-Wisconsin (president)
Wisconsin Council of Religious and Independent Schools (executive director)

Postsecondary (7):
University of Wisconsin System (president)
Wisconsin Technical College System (president)
Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (president)
Educational Approval Board (executive secretary)
Wisconsin Technical College District Boards Association (executive director)
One faculty member each from the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin Technical College System

Government (11):
Governor or his representative

Chairs and ranking members of the following:
-Senate Education Committee
-Assembly Education Committee
-Assembly Colleges and Universities Committee
-Senate Agriculture and Higher Education Committee
-Assembly Education Reform Committee

Business (2):
Department of Workforce Development (secretary)
Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce (president)

Wyoming As of April 2008, the 15 members of the council include:

Early Learning (1):
Wyoming Child and Family Development, Inc. (executive director)

K-12 and Postsecondary (1):
Wyoming School-University Partnership

K-12 Education (5):
Representation including teachers, state association of school administrators, Wyoming Education Association and state department of education.

Postsecondary (2):
University of Wyoming (associate vice president for academic affairs)
Community College Commission (deputy director)

Government (3):
Office of the Governor (Education Policy Analyst)
Joint Education Committee (co-chair plus representative)

Business (3):
Qwest Wyoming (president)
Wyoming, Inc. (president and CEO)
Wyoming Workforce Development Council


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