Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
Student Support and Remediation

As states continue to implement expanded graduation requirements – including additional Carnegie unit requirements and exit exams – it is becoming increasingly important to provide students with opportunities to catch up when they're behind. It's also becoming increasingly important to quickly identify when students begin to get behind to reach out with help before they fail. The information below describes state high school remediation requirements as defined by state statutes and regulations. ECS conducted a comprehensive review of state policies on remediation, and found existing policy for some but not all states. States with no statewide policy are not listed below.

1. Do states require remediation for low-performing high school students?

Why does it matter?
  • States benefit when more of their citizens graduate with a high school diploma, and students benefit when they earn a high school diploma.
  • States, students and the business community benefit when students graduating from high school have adequate skills to succeed on the job.
  • States and students benefit when students are prepared prior to enrollment in postsecondary studies.
  • Students benefit when academic deficiencies are addressed as early as possible in their high school career.
  • Students and schools benefit when student participation in needed remediation is mandatory, and not left to a student's choice to participate.

  • Currently, state-level policies in 33 states focus on the remediation of high school students meeting specific criteria (this number does not include states with blanket remediation policies addressed at low-performing schools and districts).  Policies in these 33 states require districts or schools to do one or more of the following at the high school level: (1) provide remediation , (2) have a program of remediation in place or (3) determine a plan for remediation. Michigan does not explicitly require that remediation be provided to students, but does require that data from the Michigan Merit Examination be provided to allow parents and teachers to prepare remediation plans. Policies explicitly requiring student participation in remediation are noted below. (States shaded in blue currently have relevant remediation policies.)



    2. Do states have a process in place for identifying students for remediation?

    Why does it matter?
  • Students benefit when schools are provided with clear direction on when and in what subjects to provide remediation.
  • Students benefit when academic deficiencies are caught and addressed early.

  • How:
     
    States commonly use a combination of state and locally adopted measures to identify students in need of remediation. Thirty states use state assessments - including high school exit exams - to determine student eligibility for remediation. Seventeen states direct districts to use locally determined indicators, including locally-adopted assessments, promotion policies or classroom performance. Five states identify other indicators. For example, students identified in Mississippi are those who have failed two ore more grades or have been suspended or expelled for 20 or more days.

    When:

    Thirty-one states specify a high school grade level at which students are first identified through one or more of the above measures as in need of remediation.
    • 9th grade: 21 states
    • 10th grade: 5 states
    • 11th grade: 5 states
    In interpreting these numbers, it is important to note that individual state policies may identify students prior to high school - as is the case in Utah and Nevada - and that many states have multiple remediation policies aimed at different grade levels.

    Subject areas:

    Listed below are the number of states that require remediation for underperformance in specified subject areas:

    • English/language arts: 30 (Although many states specifically indicate reading or writing, for the purposes of this database, English language arts includes reading, writing and literacy.)
    • Mathematics: 29
    • Science: 22
    • Social studies: 9

    3. Do states encourage or require individual learning plans for at-risk students?

    Why does it matter?
  • Low-performing students benefit from personalized learning plans that address their specific area of deficiency.
  •  
    Nineteen states currently require what can be termed "individual learning plans" for identified students. (This is distinct from state policies requiring such plans for all students; interested readers may find information on individual learning plans for all students here.) These policies include Arkansas' requirement that personal education plans be implemented for students identified as at-risk for academic failure and New Mexico's requirement that identified 8th graders be retained or provided with a graduation plan.

    4. Do states allow alternative paths to standard high school diplomas?

    Why does it matter?
  • States and students benefit when there are alternative pathways for at-risk or out-of-school youth to earn standard diplomas.


  • ECS has identified policies in 16 states that provide alternatives for at-risk or out-of-school youth to work toward graduating from high school with a standard diploma. These policies are distinct from traditional alternative schooling options in that they feature an emphasis on returning students to the regular classroom, provide options for students to earn their diploma at postsecondary institutions, allow for flexibility in a student's schedule or allow students to earn credit through demonstrated mastery of content.

    Listed policies do not include competency-based credit programs aimed at all students, early college high schools or programs that lead to a GED or an adult high school diploma. (An upcoming ECS database will examine early college high schools in the states.)

    5. Do states require that remedial programs be evaluated?

    Why does it matter?
  • Students benefit when districts (or states) are held accountable for providing high-quality remediation programs.
  • Policymakers and practitioners – not to mention parents and taxpayers – need to know if resources and time are being put to good use.


  • Policies in 10 states explicitly require districts to evaluate their remediation programs - Kentucky, Louisiana, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. Georgia's department of education is required to annually evaluate the state's remedial education program.

    Methodology: This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and will be updated as new policies and programs are enacted. Additions or corrections to listed policies are welcome.

    Last updated: June 25, 2007
     
    Please contact Kyle Zinth or Melodye Bush with questions or comments about the database. Email: kzinth@ecs.org, mbush@ecs.org

    Alabama
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, schools are required to offer remediation and students must participate unless a parent/guardian provides written permission to opt-out.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Performance on any part of the state exit exam.
    When: 11th-12th grades.
    Subject Areas: Reading, language arts, mathematics, science and social studies.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, local boards are required to submit a plan for the provision of educational services to at-risk students. Local boards are required to budget at least $100 per at-risk student to be expended on tutorial assistance programs, including after-school, Saturday school, summer school or any combination of these programs.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: ALA. CODE § 16-6B-1, Great Expectations: A Guide to Alabama's High School Graduation Exam, October 2003 (see pgs. 6-8)
    Individual Learning Plans: ALA. CODE § 16-6B-3

    Arizona
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students No
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas No
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, the AIMS intervention and dropout prevention program serves at-risk students in 7th-12th grades. Includes at least nine months of academic support designed to help students to meet state standards. Participating students must earn credit to graduate from high school, and participating districts may establish dual-credit programs to allow students to fulfill this requirement.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Alternatives: ARIZ. REV. STAT. ANN. § 15-809

    Arkansas
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to provide remediation and students must participate.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Districts and schools required to use multiple assessments, which include, but are not limited to state assessments. Students may also be identified through grades, observations and other factors considered appropriate by teachers or administrators. (High school students are required to take end-of-course examinations through the state's assessment system.)
    When: 9th-12th grades, as student completes relevant course.
    Subject Areas: Mathematics and English language arts. (End-of-course exam in Algebra I and Geometry, 9th grade test in reading and math, 11th grade literacy exam. End-of-course in Biology starting 2007-08)
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, students failing to demonstrate a proficient level of achievement are required to participate in individual academic improvement plans. Districts are required to implement personal education plans for students identified as at-risk for academic failure.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-420, ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-1602, ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-2009, ARK. REG. 005.19.006
    Individual Learning Plans: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-420, ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-1602, ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-2009

    California
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to provide.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students who fail to demonstrate proficiency on the state exit exam or who are not demonstrating sufficient progress toward passing the exam. Sufficient progress is determined by student performance on state assessments and student grades or other indicators designated by the district.
    When: 9th-12th grades for students who do not demonstrate sufficient progress toward passing the exit examination. (Also pertains to students in 7th-8th grades.) 10th-12th grade for students who have failed the exit exam. (Exit exam first administered in the 10th grade and is retaken as needed.)
    Subject Areas: Exit exam administered in English language arts and mathematics. Additionally, state assesses 9th graders in English language arts, mathematics and science, 10th graders in English language arts, mathematics, science and history-social studies and 11th graders in English language arts, math, science and history-social studies.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 37252, CAL. EDUC. CODE § 37252.2, CAL. EDUC. CODE § 60851, CAL. EDUC. CODE § 48070.5
    Individual Learning Plans: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52378


    Colorado
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students No. Colorado does not have a state-wide exit exam; however, districts that adopt an exit exam are required to provide remediation to students who fail to pass the exam.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas No
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: COLO. REV. STAT. § 22-32-109.5


    Connecticut
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, local boards are required to identify a course of study for students.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Determined by district criteria and performance on 10th grade mastery test.
    When: At least 10th grade.
    Subject Areas: 10th grade mastery test given in reading, writing and mathematics. Starting in 2007-08, assessment will be given in science as well. Districts may have additional subject requirements.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, local and regional boards of education are required to "identify a course of study for those students who have not successfully completed the assessment criteria to assist such students to reach a satisfactory level of competency prior to graduation."
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: CONN. GEN. STAT. § 10-223a, CONN. GEN. STAT. § 10-14n
    Individual Learning Plans: CONN. GEN. STAT. § 10-223a

    Delaware
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, schools must prepare individual improvement plans for identified students. (Appears in practice in 9th grade although policy no longer includes 9th grade.)
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on assessments included in the Delaware Student Testing Program.
    When: 9th grade (Appears in practice in 9th grade although policy no longer includes 9th grade.)
    Subject Areas: Reading and mathematics
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, 9th graders who score at Level 1 or Level 2 on Delaware Student Testing Program reading or mathematics assessments must have an individual improvement plan. At a minimum, improvement plans must identify a specific course of study and the academic improvement activities that the student will undertake to help the student progress towards meeting the standards. (Appears in practice in 9th grade although policy no longer includes 9th grade.)
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: DEL. ADMIN. CODE TIT 14 § 100.101.4.0, state department of education


    Florida
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to offer, and students are required to participate in reading and mathematics remediation.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Additionally, students who fail to meet grade-specific district-set levels of performance in reading, writing, science and mathematics must either (1) receive remediation or (2) be retained in grade in an intensive program that is different from the previous year's program and takes the student's learning style into account.
    When: 9th-11th grades. Remediation to occur the year following identification. The FCAT exam serves as the high school exit exam in the 10th grade. Science assessed at 11th grade.
    Subject Areas: Reading, mathematics and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, students not meeting district or state requirements for proficiency in reading, mathematics or science must be provided with an individualized progress monitoring plan to target instruction and identify ways to improve academic achievement.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, districts are required to adopt policies that provide students with:
  • Alternative methods to demonstrate competency in required courses and credits.
  • Credit recovery courses and intensive reading and math intervention courses based on student performance on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).
  • Creative and flexible scheduling designed to meet student needs.
  • State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Does not specify, although schools are required to provide for frequent monitoring and evaluation of student achievement.
    Sources Remediation: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1003.428, FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1008.25, FLA. ADMIN. CODE ANN. § 6A-1.09422
    Individual Learning Plans: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1008.25
    Remediation Evaluation: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1008.25
    Alternatives: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1003.413

    Georgia
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts must provide services to eligible students.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students must be provided with remedial education if they meet two of the following conditions: (1) They have been through the formal student support team process and have documented evidence to support the placement in remedial education; (2) They have been retained in grade; (3) They are receiving services under Part A of Chapter 1 of Title 1 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; (4) They have been recommended by a teacher who has documented: low performance in reading or mathematics; an inability to verbally express ideas and write or dictate a meaningful sentence; or current test information in the student file indicates they have a score at or below the 25th percentile; (5) They have failed either a language arts or a mathematics course; (6) The student's 8th grade Criterion-Referenced Competency Test scores indicate the student has a score in the "Does Not Meet" category in reading, English/Language arts or mathematics.
    When: 9th-12th grades.
    Subject Areas: Reading, mathematics and writing.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students
    Yes, each high school is required to have at least one student support team, and must establish policies providing for:
  • The identification of learning problems.
  • Assessment, if necessary.
  • An educational plan.
  • Implementation.
  • Follow-up and support.
  • Continuous monitoring and evaluation.
  • State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma

    Yes, state's Gateway to College Academy is designed to recover high school dropouts ages 16-20. Participating students have the option of completing high school while concurrently receiving credit towards an associate's degree in either academic transfer or technical education options.

    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, the department of education annually evaluates the remedial education program (REP). The department is required to report the achievement results of all students who received instructional services through the REP. At a minimum, the evaluation must include: (1) for students in 9th and 10th grades, "a report of the number and percentage of students who passed a system-made test in reading, writing or mathematics where all test items came from the 8th grade Criterion-Referenced Competency Test Item Bank in the appropriate subject area(s) or any grade-level appropriate End-of-Course Test." (2) for students in 11th and 12th grades, "a report of the percentage of REP students passing the Georgia High School Graduation Test in the content area(s) in which they are served, in addition to any grade-level appropriate End-of-Course Test."
    Sources Remediation: GA. CODE ANN. § 20-2-154, GA. COMP. R. § 160-4-5-.01
    Remediation Evaluation: GA. COMP. R. § 160-4-5-.01
    Individual Learning Plans: GA. COMP. R. & REGS. § 160-4-2-.32
    Alternatives: GA. COMP. R. & REGS. r. § 160-4-2-.34, program Web site, accessed 7/6/2007

    Illinois
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, must be offered and students are required to participate.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students performing at levels two grades below their current placement, determined through state or local assessments or teacher judgment. Additionally, students identified through locally-determined grade promotion policies as not qualifying for promotion must be provided remedial assistance.
    When: Students required to take Prairie State Achievement Examination in 11th grade.
    Subject Areas: Reading, writing, mathematics and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: ILL. REV. STAT. CH 105 § 5/2-3.64, ILL. REV. STAT. CH 105 § 5/10-20.9a

    Indiana
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to hold a conference with students and their parents at which time they must present a proposed remediation plan for the student. Students must participate in remediation to be eligible to graduate without passing the exit exam.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Performance on Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress (ISTEP).
    When: 9th and 10th grades.
    Subject Areas: English language arts and mathematics.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, parents of students who do not receive a passing score on the Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress (ISTEP)+ or ISTEP must be notified, and a parent/teacher conference set up to discuss the student's scores and a proposed remediation plan.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, two programs.

    School Flex Program
    Allows eligible students to attend school for a minimum of three hours a day as they pursue their diploma. Eligible students are 11th or 12th graders who have: (1) failed the ISTEP+ graduation exam at least twice; (2) been determined to be chronically absent; (3) been determined to be a habitual truant; (4) been significantly behind in credits for graduation, as identified by an individual's school principal; (5) previously undergone at least a second suspension from school for the school year; (6) previously undergone an expulsion from school; or (7) been determined by the their principal and parents to benefit by participating in the program.

    Participating students must: (1) attend school for at least three hours of instructional time per school day; (2) pursue a timely graduation; (3) provide evidence of college or technical career education enrollment and attendance or proof of employment and labor that is aligned with their career academic sequence; (4) not be suspended or expelled while participating in a school flex program; (5) pursue course and credit requirements for a general diploma; and (6) maintain a 95% attendance rate.  

    Fast Track to College
    Authorizes state higher educational institutions to establish fast track to college programs that offer qualified individuals an opportunity to earn a high school diploma while earning credits for a degree. To be eligible for program participation, individuals must be either: (1) at least 19 and not enrolled in a school; or (2) at least 17 and have consent from the high school of most recent attendance.

    To receive a high school diploma through this program a student must pass (1) the state graduation exam; (2) an examination for a GED; (3) an exam equivalent to the graduation examination or (4) an examination that demonstrates the student is ready for college level work. Students must also complete the coursework necessary to meet: (1) the minimum high school course requirements established by the state board; and (2) the requirements of the participating state higher educational institution.

    Upon completion of the program, individuals are awarded a high school diploma that states the name of the educational institution where they earned the diploma.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-32-5-10, IND. CODE ANN. § 20-32-4-4, Learn More Indiana Web site, accessed 8/7/2007
    Individual Learning Plans: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-32-5-10
    Alternatives: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-30-2-2.2 (school flex), IND. CODE ANN. § 20-12-13-6 (fast track to college)

    Kentucky
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts must offer services, and may require student participation.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students who have been retained in grade or at risk of not graduating on time or dropping out.
    When: Does not specify.
    Subject Areas: Does not specify. However, starting in 2007-08, 10th, 11th and 12th grade students have the option of taking the ACT WorkKeys assessment. Students whose scores indicate assistance is required in reading for information, locating information or applied mathematics must have intervention strategies incorporated into their learning plans.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, extended day instructional programs (which must be offered to identified students) must include: (1) a method to assess the priority educational needs of each individual student and to determine the academic expectations to be exhibited by the student at the end of the program; (2) an appropriate educational program designed for the individual student which assists the student in mastering the academic expectations within the timelines specified by the program; (3) an ongoing method of informal and formal assessment to document the student's progress toward mastery of the academic expectations; (4) a schedule of services which shall be of the duration and regularity necessary to allow mastery of the academic expectations within a reasonable and projected timeline.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, the Kentucky Virtual High School offers a nine-week credit recovery program. The flexibility of online courses allows students to focus on the content not yet mastered and is easily adapted to local school policies for credit recovery.

    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts must submit to the department of education: (1) student data through the School Management System software at the end of the regular school term and any summer term in which funds are expended for extended school services; (2) a separate written evaluation and evaluative data as approved in the waiver application, if the school district receives approval to implement extended school services during the regular school day; and (3) comparative data relative to the regular extended school service program and the daytime extended school service program including: (a) Pre- and post-student qualitative and quantitative performance data; (b) Student attendance at extended school services; and (c) Promotion and graduation data resulting from participation in extended school services.
    Sources Remediation: KY. REV. STAT. § 158.070 , 704 KY. ADMIN. REG. § 3:390, KY. REV. STAT. § 158.6453, KY. REV. STAT. § 158.6459
    Remediation Evaluation: 704 KY. ADMIN. REG. § 3:390
    Individual Learning Plans: 704 KY. ADMIN. REG. § 3:390
    Alternatives: Kentucky Virtual High School fact sheet, accessed 10/01/2007

    Louisiana
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts must offer remediation, students may opt out with written documentation.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Student performance on the state Graduation Exit Examination (GEE) tests.
    When: State's GEE exit exam is first administered in the 10th grade.
    Subject Areas: English language arts, mathematics, social studies and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No. (Although students must be provided with 50 hours of instruction in the subject in which they failed to achieve proficiency on the Graduate Exit Exam.)
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, 2006 legislation directs the state board and the board of supervisors of community and technical colleges to establish a means for schools to award postsecondary technical college credit and high school credit for units taken at either a community college, technical college or high school. Encouraging the participation of students who appear to be likely dropouts is a goal and main focus of partnerships between local boards and community and technical colleges.

    The state board is directed, during the 2007-08 school year, to select at least two partnerships to undertake sharing at least 10% of potential dropouts identified by a local board and providing for their dual enrollment. Participating schools and institutions are required to report the effect of the implementation on students and difficulties encountered during the partnership. Based on information gathered during the pilot year, the board is authorized to extend the pilot and increase the number of partnerships for a second school year, or scale dual enrollment partnerships up to include any number of partnerships that appear viable and supportable.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts are required to annually submit an evaluation to the state board.
    Sources Remediation: LA. REV. STAT. ANN. § 17:24.4, LA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 28, § XXXIX.911, LA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 28, § XXXIX.913
    Remediation Evaluation: LA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 28, § XXXIX.913
    Individual Learning Plans: LA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 28, § XXXIX.911
    Alternatives: LA. REV. STAT. ANN. § 17:187.1 - LA. REV. STAT. ANN. § 17:187.5

    Maryland
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, local school systems are required to provide appropriate assistance to strengthen areas of weakness.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on Maryland High School Assessments, which are end-of-course examinations.
    When: 9th-12 grades, dependent upon when student takes course.
    Subject Areas: English II, algebra/data analysis, biology and government.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: MD. REGS. CODE TIT. 13A, § 03.02.07

    Michigan
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students No. Although students failing to meet expectations for each standard on the Michigan Merit Examination must be provided with an individual report that will allow the student's parents and teachers to assess and remedy problems before the student moves to the next grade.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Performance on the Michigan Merit Examination.
    When: Assessment administered in 11th grade.
    Subject Areas: English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, each student failing to meet expectations for each standard on the Michigan Merit Examination must be provided with an individual report that will allow the student's parents and teachers to assess and remedy problems before the student moves to the next grade.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: MICH. STAT. ANN. § 380.1279g
    Individual Learning Plans: MICH. STAT. ANN. § 380.1279g

    Minnesota
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to develop a plan for identified students.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on state Basic Skills assessments through class of 2009.
    When: At least two years before the student's anticipated graduation.
    Subject Areas: Reading, mathematics and written composition. Basic Skills assessment in reading and mathematics first administered in 8th grade, written composition in 10th.

    The state is in the process of phasing in the Graduation Required Assessment for Diploma (GRAD), effective with the class of 2010. GRAD will assess writing in 9th grade, reading in 10th grade and mathematics in 11th grade. The rulemaking process will address remediation requirements.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, districts are required to develop a remediation plan for identified students.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, the graduation incentives program is designed to allow students who have experienced or are experiencing difficulty in the traditional education system to enroll in alternative programs.

    Eligible students include those under 21 who:
  • Perform substantially below the performance level for pupils of the same age in a locally determined achievement test.
  • Are at least one year behind in satisfactorily completing coursework or obtaining credits for graduation.
  • Have been excluded or expelled from school.
  • Have withdrawn from school or have been chronically truant.

  • Eligible programs that students may enroll in include area learning centers which grant diplomas to students successfully completing a program. Additionally, eligible students may enroll in postsecondary courses under the state's postsecondary enrollment options act. Students enrolling in postsecondary courses under this program must indicate whether credits earned will count as postsecondary credit, or as high school credits counting toward a high school diploma.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: MINN. R. § 3501.0110, 2007 H.F. 2245, department of education Web site, accessed 8/10/2007
    Individual Learning Plans: MINN. R. § 3501.0110
    Alternatives: MINN. STAT. ANN. § 124D.68, MINN. STAT. ANN. § 124D.09

    Mississippi
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts must offer intensive interventions.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students may be identified through informal classroom assessment, benchmark assessment instruments and large-scale assessments.
    When: Students in 9th-12 grades who have failed two grades or have been suspended or expelled for more than 20 days in the current school year.
    Subject Areas: Does not specify.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, intensive interventions specifically designed for individual students must be provided for students who have failed two grades or have been suspended or expelled for more than 20 days in the current school year.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: MISS. REG. 36-000-001
    Individual Learning Plans: MISS. REG. 36-000-001

    Nevada
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to provide services, and 11th graders who have failed exit exam twice or more required to participate. (Required participation may be waived by local superintendent.)
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students who fail any of the high school proficiency examinations two or more times or who are deemed deficient in the minimum number of credits to be promoted to the next grade, as defined in NEV. ADMIN. CODE 389.659.
    When: Promotion-related remediation: 9th-12th grades. Exit exam related remediation: 11th-12th grades. (Exit exam first administered in 10th grade.)
    Subject Areas: English, mathematics and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, districts are authorized to offer alternative programs for at-risk youth that include the opportunity for these students to earn a standard high school diploma. These programs may provide for flexible scheduling, the opportunity for students to gain academic credit through work experience or distance education delivery.

    The state's distance education laws explicitly address drop-out prevention and recovery. Distance education courses are designed for pupils who are participating in a program for students at risk of dropping out of high school. One category of eligibility for participation in distance education courses is that students are participating in a program for pupils at risk of dropping out of high school. (Additional student categories are also eligible for participation in distance education courses.)

    Additionally, 2007 legislation requires districts to adopt policies that would allow for a student to be placed on academic probation and to earn credits required for high school while they are still completing the requirements for promotion to high school.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: NEV. ADMIN. CODE CH. 389, § 660, NEV. ADMIN. CODE CH. 389, § 661
    Alternatives: NEV. REV. STAT. § 388.537, NEV. REV. STAT. § 388.850, NEV. REV. STAT. § 388.829, 2007 S.B. 312

    New Hampshire
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, high school instructional programs must include the provision of remedial instruction as needed.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas No
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, state provides for a dropout prevention and recovery grant program. Eligible applicants are community-based organizations, school districts and private organizations. Among program requirements, applicants must provide: (1) services designed to assist pupils in the successful completion of high school; (2) tutoring, study skills training and instruction leading to successful completion of secondary school, including dropout prevention strategies through a school-site mentor; and (3) alternative secondary school services with high academic standards. Programs must establish an 85% graduation rate and a 90% return to school rate for students most likely to drop out as performance goals for program participants.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No.
    Sources Remediation: N.H. ADMIN. RULES, ED. 306.27
    Alternatives: N.H. ANN. REV. STAT. Stat. § 189.59, N.H. CODE ADMIN. R. 901.1 - N.H. CODE ADMIN. R. 907.03

    New Jersey
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to provide services.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students performing below established levels of proficiency on state or local assessments.
    When: 11th and 12th grades.
    Subject Areas: Mathematics, language arts literacy and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: N.J. REV. STAT. § 18A:7C-3, N.J. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 6A, § 8-4.3

    New Mexico
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students No
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas No
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, students in the 8th grade failing to make adequate yearly progress are to be retained or provided with a graduation plan to meet their needs for entry into the work force or a postsecondary educational institution.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Individual Learning Plans: N.M. STAT. ANN. § 22-2C-6

    New York
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to provide academic intervention services.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: State intermediate assessments and state examinations required for graduation, as well as district-developed or adopted procedures to identify students at risk of not achieving state learning standards.
    When: 9th-12th grades.
    Subject Areas: English language arts, mathematics, social studies and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, each school district is required to review and revise its description of academic intervention services every two years based on student performance results.
    Sources Remediation: N.Y. COMP. CODES. R. & REGS. TIT. 8, § 100.2
    Remediation Evaluation: N.Y. COMP. R. TIT. 8, § 101.2

    North Carolina
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts must provide.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through state assessments – including end-of-course exams – and locally adopted student promotion policies.
    When: 9th grade and above.
    Subject Areas: Reading, mathematics or "a portion of the multiple choice or performance computer skills tests[.]" As of the 2006-07 school year, students must pass end-of-course exams in English I, U.S. History, Biology, Civics and Economics and Algebra I.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, students identified as at high risk of failing or who fail competency tests must be provided with plans designed to meet their specific needs. Additionally, students who do not meet district promotion standards (which must include statewide accountability standards) must be provided with personalized education plans.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts are required to annually report to the department of education their progress in increasing the number of students who meet the standard for grade-level promotion.
    Sources Remediation: N.C.ADMIN. CODE TIT. 16, § 6D.0301, N.C.ADMIN. CODE TIT. 16, § 6D.0503
    Remediation Evaluation: N.C.ADMIN. CODE TIT. 16, § 6D.0505
    Individual Learning Plans: N.C.ADMIN. CODE TIT. 16, § 6D.0301, N.C.ADMIN. CODE TIT. 16, § 6D.0505

    Ohio
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to provide intervention services.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students failing to perform at least at the proficient level on the state graduation exam.
    When: The test is first administered in the 10th grade, and administered as necessary for 11th and 12th grade students failing to reach the proficient level.
    Subject Areas: Reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, students in a dropout prevention and recovery program may graduate from high school by completing a competency-based instructional program instead of the Ohio core curriculum. (The Ohio core curriculum will become the default graduation requirements for all students starting with the class of 2014.)

    Waivers may only be granted by the department of education if the program:
  • Serves only students between the ages of 16-21.
  • Enrolls students who are at least one grade level behind or experience crises that significantly interfere with their academic progress such that they are prevented from continuing their traditional programs.
  • Requires students to attain at least the applicable score designated for each portion of the Ohio graduation test.
  • Develops an individual career plan for the student that specifies the student's matriculating to a two-year degree program, acquiring a business and industry credential or entering an apprenticeship.
  • Provides counseling and support related to the individual career plan during the remainder of the student's high school experience.
  • Requires the student and the student's parent to sign and file a written statement asserting the parent's consent to the student's graduating without completing the Ohio core curriculum and acknowledging that one consequence of not completing the Ohio core curriculum is ineligibility to enroll in most state universities in Ohio without further coursework.
  • Prior to receiving the waiver, the program has submitted to the department an instructional plan that demonstrates how the state academic content standards will be taught and assessed.
  • State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, local boards are required to determine procedures for using student performance data to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention services and, if necessary, to modify such services.
    Sources Remediation: OHIO. REV. CODE ANN. § 3301.0711
    Remediation Evaluation: OHIO REV. STAT. ANN. § 3313.6012
    Alternatives: OHIO REV. CODE ANN. § 3313.603

    Oklahoma
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to provide remediation.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Performance on state end-of-instruction tests.
    When: 9th-12th grades, dependent upon when student takes class.
    Subject Areas: English II, English III, U.S. History, Biology I, Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry (The state is in the process of phasing in exams for all of the subjects, and starting with freshmen entering in 2008, students will be required to pass end-of-instruction exams in Algebra I, English II, and tests in two other subject areas. OKLA. STAT. TIT. 70, § 1210.523)
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, required alternative education programs must be designed to serve secondary school students in 6th-12th grades who are most at risk of not completing high school. Programs must include the development of a plan leading to graduation for each student in the program that will allow the student to participate in graduation exercises for the school district after meeting the requirements of the school district as specified in the individual graduation plan for that student.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: OKLA. STAT. TIT. 70, § 1210.508
    Individual Learning Plans: OKLA. STAT. TIT. 70 § 1210.568 

    Oregon
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to provide additional services.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on Oregon statewide assessments.
    When: 10th grade. (Students may take exam early in 8th or 9th grade, or 11th or 12th as a make-up.)
    Subject Areas: English, mathematics and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, the Expanded Options Program (EOP) allows students to earn dual high school and college credit. School districts must identify and notify all at-risk students and their parents about the EOP. It is a priority for school districts to provide information about the EOP to high school students who have dropped out of school.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: OR. ADMIN. R. § 581-022-1110
    Alternatives: OR. REV. STAT. § 340.005 - OR. REV. STAT. § 340.090

    Pennsylvania
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to establish programs to serve identified students.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on Pennsylvania System of School Assessment.
    When: Assessment given in 11th grade, with additional opportunity in 12th grade.
    Subject Areas: Mathematics and Reading
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, Successful Students’ Partnership is a statewide dropout prevention initiative. Districts apply for funds to operate dropout prevention and recovery programs. Funds are granted for three years and the districts receiving the funds provide information on the practices which were most effective in dropout prevention and the approaches which were successful in outreach/recovery efforts.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: PA. STAT. ANN. TIT. 24, § 15-1511.1
    Alternatives: State department of education Web site, accessed 08/09/2007

    Rhode Island
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, each high school is required to have specific program in place to support students.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through department of education approved diagnostic assessments.
    When: 9th and 11th grades.
    Subject Areas: English language arts.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, based on student performance, districts are required to evaluate the effectiveness of their literacy programs every two years.
    Sources Remediation: R.I. RULES § 08-010-011
    Remediation Evaluation: R.I. RULES § 08-010-011

    South Carolina
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to provide academic assistance.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on high school end-of-course exams.
    When: 9th-12th, dependent upon when student takes course.
    Subject Areas: Algebra 1/Math for the Technologies 2, English 1, Physical Science, and U.S. History and the Constitution.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, all high schools are required to implement at least one model program for at-risk youth, which must provide students with the opportunity to graduate with a standard high school diploma. The Education and Economic Development Coordinating Council At-Risk Student Committee has developed an implementation guide that identifies approved evidence-based models, initiatives and programs. The guide was distributed to all elementary, middle and high school principals. In 2007, $4.3 million was allocated to help schools implement approved programs.

    Additionally, the South Carolina Student Loan Corporation has donated $3 million to improve student academic programs for the state’s 16 Palmetto Priority Schools. The funds will be used to establish a Star Academy program at each school to work with overage students who are at-risk of dropping out. Star Academies function as a school-within-a-school and take students through an accelerated, rigorous course of study that enables them to complete 8th and 9th grade in one school year.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: S.C. CODE REGS. § 43-262
    Alternatives: S.C. CODE REGS. § 43-274.1, At-Risk Student Intervention Implementation Guide, accessed 8/10/2007, department of education Web site, accessed 9/28/2007

    Tennessee
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to provide interventions. Students required to participate.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through student performance on statewide competency test and gateway examinations.
    When: Competency test first administered in 9th grade, writing assessment in 11th grade and other gateway tests. Grades vary as tests are administered following conclusion of courses.
    Subject Areas: Competency test: Mathematics and English language arts. Gateway examinations: English language arts, mathematics and science.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: TENN. COMP. R. & REGS. 0520-1-3-.06

    Texas
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to provide intensive interventions.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Student performance on any Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) exam. District's determination for students not likely to graduate within five years. Students identified as at-risk of dropping out through classroom performance in foundation curriculum subjects, state assessments and multiple other measures, including pregnancy.
    When: 9th-11th grades (11th-grade TAKS serves as the state's exit examination.)
    Subject Areas: English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies.

    The state will transition to the use of end-of-course exams for students entering 9th grade in 2011-12. Districts will be required to provide accelerated instruction to students who do not perform satisfactorily on end-of-course exams.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, a personal graduation plan must be administered for each student who: (1) doesn't perform satisfactorily on a Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills exit exam; or (2) isn't likely to receive a high school diploma before the fifth school year following the student's enrollment in 9th grade, as determined by the district.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, policy makes provisions for an optional school day program for high school students who: (1) are dropouts or at-risk of dropping out or (2) attend a campus that is implementing an innovative redesign or early college plan. The program allows districts flexibility in the delivery of the instructional program in terms of the numbers of hours a student attends school each day or the number of days a week a student attends. Students would also be allowed to enroll for less than a full course load. Attendance accounting would allow for accumulations of instructional time to earn state funding. The commissioner has rulemaking authority for the program.

    Additionally, 2007 legislation permits students between 21 and 26 to be eligible for funding under the foundation school program for the purposes of completing the requirements for a high school diploma. Eligible students may enroll in high schools to fulfill the requirements of a high school diploma, and districts receive funding for serving these students. Districts are responsible for keeping students over 21 years old who have not attended school in the three preceding school years separated from students 18 and younger.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts are required to evaluate and document the effectiveness of the accelerated instruction provided to students who have not performed satisfactorily on the high school exit exam or who are at-risk of dropping out.
    Sources Remediation: TEX. EDUC. CODE § 28.0213, TEX. EDUC. CODE § 29.081, TEX. EDUC. CODE § 39.025, 2007 S.B. 1031
    Remediation Evaluation: TEX. EDUC. CODE § 29.081
    Individual Learning Plans: TEX. EDUC. CODE § 28.0212
    Alternatives: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 29.0822, 2007 H.B. 1137

    Utah
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts required to provide remedial services. Student participation is mandatory.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Determined by classroom performance.
    When: 7th-12th grades.
    Subject Areas: English, mathematics, science and social studies.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: UTAH CODE ANN. § 53A-13-104

    Vermont
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students No
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas No
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, the purpose of the state's high school completion program is to provide out of school youth ages 16-21 with educational services of the scope and rigor needed for the attainment of a local high school diploma. Required individualized graduation plans are designed to offer young dropouts engaging and effective learning opportunities that fit the personal needs and interests of each student.
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Alternatives: VT. STAT. ANN. TIT. 16, § 1049a

    Virginia
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, local boards required to develop and implement programs of prevention, intervention and remediation.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Local determination as well as students identified through use of Standards of Learning (SOL) assessments, end-of-course exams administered to determine if a student has earned verifiable credit towards graduation.
    When: 9th-12th grades.
    Subject Areas: English, mathematics, science, history and social sciences.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, each school division is required to record for each eligible student attending a state-funded remedial program: (1) the state or local criteria used to determine eligibility; (2) the expected remediation goal for the student in terms of a target score on a locally designed or selected test which measures the SOL content being remediated; and (3) whether the student did or did not meet the expected remediation goal.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts are required to annually evaluate and modify their remediation plan based on an analysis of the percentage of students meeting their remediation goals. The pass rate on the Standards of Learning assessments is also a measure of the effectiveness of the remedial program.
    Sources Remediation: VA. CODE ANN. § 22.1-253.13:1, VA. CODE ANN. § 22.1-253.13:2, VA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 8, § 20-630-20
    Remediation Evaluation: VA. CODE ANN. § 22.1-199.2 VA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 8, § 20-630-40
    Individual Learning Plans: VA. ADMIN. CODE TIT. 8, § 20-630-30

    Washington
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, districts are required to offer remedial services.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL) or district selected assessments.
    When: 9th-12th grade
    Subject Areas: Reading, writing and mathematics. (Science effective class of 2010)
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, individual student learning plans must be implemented for each student in 8th-12th grade who was unsuccessful in a Washington Assessment of Student Learning content area the previous year.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma Yes, community college high school diploma programs enable students to earn a high school diploma without attending a high school. Programs of study are determined through evaluation of a student's previous educational records. For students over 18 years old, evaluative testing may also be used to determine the student's educational level.

    Students over the age of 18 can earn a high school diploma by satisfying minimum course requirements through one or more of the following methods:
  • Actual completion of courses regularly conducted in high school.
  • Taking courses at a technical college.
  • Taking courses at a community college.
  • Approved correspondence or extension courses.
  • Supervised independent study.
  • Testing in specific subject areas.
  • State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts receiving funds through the Learning Assistance Program are required to indicate how the program will be evaluated to determine direction for the next school year. Additionally, districts are required to inform parents of students receiving a learning plan of their child's progress and any necessary adjustments for the learning plan.
    Sources Remediation: WASH. ADMIN. CODE § 392-410-115, WASH. REV. STAT. §28A.655.061
    Remediation Evaluation: WASH. REV. CODE § 28A.165.025, WASH. REV. STAT. §28A.655.061
    Individual Learning Plans: WASH. REV. STAT. §28A.655.061, State department of education Web site
    Alternatives: WASH. ADMIN. CODE § 180-51-053

    West Virginia
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, students who do not demonstrate mastery of the content standards and objectives must be provided extra help and extra time through intervention strategies.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Through performance on state assessments.
    When: 10th grade.
    Subject Areas: Reading/Language Arts, Math, Science (West Virginia Educational Standards Test, or WESTEST); Writing (West Virginia Writing Assessment).
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students No. (Although school counselors are required to work with individual students in providing developmental, preventive and remedial guidance and counseling programs to meet academic needs, including programs to identify and address the problem of potential school dropouts.)
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program No
    Sources Remediation: W.V. ADMIN. CODE § 126-42-5, W.V. ADMIN. CODE § 126-13-4, W.V. ADMIN. CODE § 126-13-6
    Individual Learning Plans: W. VA. CODE § 18-5-18b

    Wisconsin
    Student Support and Remediation
    State requires remediation for low-performing high school students Yes, local boards required to provide services.
    State specifies a process for identifying students to receive additional subject time in certain subject areas How: Students who meet at least two of the following criteria: (1) are one or more years behind their age group in the number of high school credits attained; (2) two or more years behind their age group in basic skill levels, as measured by formal and informal assessment; (3) habitual truants; (4) parents; or (5) adjudicated delinquents.
    When: Students between 9th-12th grades. (Policy also pertains to students in 5th-8th grade who meet certain criteria.)
    Subject Areas: Includes reading and mathematics.
    State requires individual learning plans for at-risk students Yes, school boards are required to identify at risk students enrolled in the district and annually develop a plan describing how the board will meet their needs.
    State provides alternatives for at-risk/out-of-school youth to earn a standard high school diploma None identified
    State policy requires district or state to evaluate student remediation program Yes, districts eligible for state aid for children at risk programs are required to annually report on the number of students:
  • By grade level, who were identified as at risk, who requested enrollment in the program and who were enrolled in the program.
  • Who met or exceeded the attendance rate of 70%.
  • Who remained enrolled through the end of the school year.
  • Who, if seniors, received a high school diploma.
  • Who earned at least 4.5 academic credits.
  • Who demonstrated, on standardized tests or other appropriate measures, a gain in reading and mathematics commensurate with the duration of enrollment in the program.
  • Who achieved at least three of the above objectives.
  • Sources Remediation: WIS. STAT. ANN. § 118.153, WIS. ADMIN. CODE § PI 25.01 - WIS. ADMIN. CODE § PI 25.07
    Remediation Evaluation: WIS. ADMIN. CODE § PI 25.03 and WIS. ADMIN. CODE § PI 25.07
    Individual Learning Plans: WIS. STAT. ANN. § 118.153



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