Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement (AP), first established in 1955 as a program for gifted students, has seen tremendous growth since the 1990s. This database provides information on state policies and programs to support AP. Clarification is provided below on the value of such policies and programs and the types of state policies and programs included in each data point.

State mandates AP course offerings: This indicates whether state policy requires all high schools in a state to offer one or more AP courses. AP courses are often less plentiful in low-income and high-minority schools and districts. Requiring all high schools to offer a minimum number of AP courses helps ensure greater equality of AP course availability between higher-income and lower-income schools. Currently, only three states -- Arkansas, Indiana and South Carolina -- mandate that all high schools offer AP courses. Effective with the 2008-2009 school year, West Virginia will require all high schools to offer at least four AP courses or the International Baccalaureate program.

State provides financial incentives for AP courses: Policies and programs offering financial support for AP courses are a help especially to low-income and small schools. This data set primarily includes two types of policies and programs:
(1) Those that provide schools and districts with start-up or expansion funds to purchase textbooks and classroom materials for AP courses. Currently 10 states have state policies or programs (not including federal funds) to support equipment and instructional material costs for AP courses.
(2)Those that financially reward schools and/or districts for the number of students completing AP courses and/or earning a "3" or higher on an AP exam. Currently three states provide schools and/or districts with such rewards.
Kentucky and New Mexico have unique policies to provide financial supports to AP programs that do not fall into either of these categories.

State provides accountability incentives for AP courses: Schools need to be held publicly accountable for providing AP courses. Requiring schools and districts to publish disaggregated data on course taking and AP test results will help achieve this goal. States identified in this data set have one or more of the following types of policies:
(1) Policies tying AP offerings to school accreditation. Currently two states -- Colorado and Michigan -- include AP participation as an indicator for public school accreditation.
(2) Policies including AP course taking and test taking data on school accountability report cards, etc. Fifteen states include AP participation in school, district and/or state report cards and/or other accountability rating systems. This data set does not include state policies that require schools or districts to report AP course- and exam-taking but do not include these in accreditation indicators or require the department to release these data to the public.

State programs and funding for teacher training: AP teachers need to be trained in the content and skills tested on AP exams to help them prepare their students for these assessments. State programs – and dedicated funding – for teacher preparation and professional development can ensure that the course content lives up to the expectations of the AP program and adequately prepares students for AP exams. This data set consists of the following state policies and programs, including those supported through federal and National Governors Association (NGA) Honor State grants:
(1) Programs providing funds to cover tuition and other expenses associated with AP and pre-AP training and professional development. ECS has identified 27 states that make funds available for AP teachers to attend AP training.
(2) State policies mandating that AP and pre-AP teachers complete program-specific training and professional development. Currently, five states mandate that AP teachers complete AP training.

Subsidies for testing fees: As of spring 2007, the fee for each AP exam is $83. The College Board, which administers the AP exams, provides a $22 fee reduction to all students eligible for free/reduced lunch. A handful of states have adopted policies to earmark funds to cover all or some AP exam fees, which helps not only low-income students, but also students who wish to take multiple exams the same spring and families with siblings taking exams at the same time. Some states indicate that funds to cover AP testing fees are to be awarded only to low-income students, while other states place no restrictions on eligibility. At this time, virtually all states receive funds through the U.S. Department of Education's Advanced Placement Test Fee Program to cover all or a substantial portion of the AP test fees of students eligible for free and reduced lunch.

State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores: Many students take AP courses without sitting for the year-end AP exam. To encourage students to take and do well on AP exams, three states -- Arizona, California and Massachusetts -- include performance on AP or other specified exams among the eligibility criteria for state-supported college scholarships.

Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education: AP programs can be costly to provide. ECS has identified 11 states that have adopted policies to encourage or mandate that higher education assist K-12 in offering AP courses and materials. Information on AP distance learning programs supported by universities is included in the "encouraging access" data set. Information on AP teacher professional development opportunities supported by postsecondary institutions is included in the "teacher training" data set.

State support for encouraging access to AP: Small, rural and low-income schools face particular challenges in offering AP courses. In addition, traditionally underserved students and children of parents who did not attend college may not be aware of the benefits of AP course- and exam-taking, or may not be exposed to courses in the middle and early high school grades that will ensure they are adequately prepared for challenging AP course content. This data set includes the following types of initiatives:

(1) State-funded AP distance learning opportunities. Twenty-five states offer state-supported virtual AP courses. However, it should be noted that some students do not do well without the structure afforded by a classroom environment. In addition, opportunities for AP course-taking in low-income schools will continue to be limited if states do not ensure adequate student access to technology.
(2) Support for pre-AP curricula and teacher professional development. When students arrive at their junior or senior year of high school far behind in the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in AP courses, it’s often too late to catch up. Pre-AP courses and training align course expectations from grades six through 12 so that students are ready to succeed in AP courses in high school. ECS has identified six states that have policies or programs to either support or mandate pre-AP structures and teacher training. A seventh state, Arizona, is using federal Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) funds to support pre-AP efforts in select schools in the state.
(3) Policies designed to identify and counsel students capable of succeeding in AP coursework. All six states receiving Phase II Honor State funds from the National Governors Association (NGA) to support AP programs are using the PSAT in the schools receiving Honor State funds to measure students' AP potential. In addition, two states have explicit policies related to the identification and recruitment of students to AP courses.
(4) Policies aimed at encouraging minority and low-income students to take AP courses and exams. Two states have state policies targeted at increasing AP participation among traditionally underserved students. Again, federal APIP funds and Phase II Honor State grants from the National Governors Association (NGA) also contribute to state efforts in this area.
(5) Policies or programs targeting AP funding for low-income, high-minority or rural schools. Two states have policies targeting AP funds at districts and/or schools serving large concentrations of low-income and/or other disadvantaged students.
(6) Policies or programs explicitly requiring or encouraging the state to consider geographic diversity in awarding AP funding. Two states have policies encouraging or mandating even geographic distribution of AP supports.
(7) Summer AP programs for high school students. Iowa offers a summer AP institute that allows students to take AP courses potentially unavailable in their local high schools.

Student must take AP exam to receive course credit: If a student doesn’t take the exam, it’s not possible to tell if he/she learned the content one would expect of an AP course. Requiring a student to take the exam ensures that the grade in the class is aligned with the student’s mastery of the course content knowledge. One state -- South Carolina -- requires students in state-funded AP programs to take the AP exam to receive course credit. Arkansas specifies that the student must complete the AP exam to receive weighted course credit.

This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites from April to August 2006, and will be updated as new policies and programs are enacted.

This database was compiled by Jennifer Dounay, project manager, ECS High School Policy Center. For questions, additions or corrections: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.
Alabama
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. In the 2006-2007 school year, the Alabama Department of Education is offering districts competitive grants to help cover the costs of instructional materials and supplies for AP teachers. "Instructional materials funding is available for 125 new AP courses and 125 existing AP courses. For each new AP teacher who completes a College Board-approved 2007 summer institute, the LEA can apply for $1,200 per classroom to purchase instructional materials to support implementation of the new AP class. For existing AP classes, the LEA can request $1,200 per classroom to purchase instructional materials and supplies for the 2006-2007 school year provided that the teacher has attended a College Board-approved AP summer institute in the specific subject area within the past three years."
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. In the 2006-2007 school year, the Alabama Department of Education is offering districts competitive grants to cover up to 250 scholarships for teachers, counselors and administrators to attend AP workshops and institutes. Each grantee district will be reimbursed up to $1,300 per teacher, counselor or administrator. "Funds can be used to offset the cost of tuition, travel and stipends."

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to support professional development activities for AP teachers, counselors and administrators in select high schools around the state with high concentrations of minority and low-income students.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. In the 2006-2007 school year, the Alabama Department of Education is offering districts competitive grants. Grant funds are available in the amount of $82 per exam for any student who is not eligible for the federal AP fee payment program. The program also offers districts $12 per student to administer the PSAT/NMSQT to students in grades 10 and 11. "These exams provide diagnostic analyses of skills attained by students and relate student scores to the probability of success in AP courses and on AP exams."

The Department also provides funds to cover AP test fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. ACCESS (Alabama Connecting Classrooms, Educators & Students Statewide) is an initiative of the Alabama Department of Education, offering a number of AP courses via distance learning. As of fall 2006, any Alabama public high school student is eligible to request free ACCESS distance learning courses.

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to increase AP offerings and quality in targeted low-income and high minority schools. The NGA strategy includes expanding AP courses; AP professional development for teachers, administrators and counselors; preparing students in the middle grades for AP rigor; and using the PSAT to measure AP potential. "The state has identified one urban district, one rural district, and six of their high schools to participate in this effort to expand AP participation. ... will choose an external evaluation firm to assess the progress of the pilot districts and schools and integrate AP expansion into the Alabama High School Redesign Strategic Plan."
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: July 24, 2006 Department memo
Teacher training: July 24, 2006 Department memo; National Governors Association Web site
Testing fees: July 24, 2006 Department memo; Department AP Fee Payment Program
Encouraging access: ACCESS Web site; National Governors Association Web site

Alaska
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The Alaska Department of Education and Early Development (EED) covers test fees for any student whose family meets or exceeds 150% of the poverty level as determined by the U.S. Census Bureau.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: Alaska Advanced Placement Examination 2005 Fee Reduction Policy

American Samoa
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No information located
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No information located
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No information located
State programs and funding for teacher training No information located
State subsidies for testing fees No information located
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No information located
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No information located
State support for encouraging access to AP No information located
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No information located

Arizona
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Options for Excellence program at Arizona State University provides AP teacher mentoring and training.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, Arizona offers funds to cover the test fees of students eligible for free and reduced lunch.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores Yes. The state offers a tuition waiver valid at state universities for one full year following graduation from high school (renewable for up to 4 additional years based on university-determined criteria). Eligible students must meet three sets of criteria:
(1) Complete 16 "Core Competency Courses" with at least a "B" OR earn an acceptable score on the AP test or a "4" on the International Baccalaureate (IB) test for that subject area.
(2) Meet GPA or class rank requirements.
(3) Exceed standards on all 3 AIMS (Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards) tests OR exceed standards on 2 AIMS tests and earn at least a "3" on any two AP tests or at least a "4" on any two IB tests.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The Options for Excellence program administered by Arizona State University seeks to increase the number of challenging curriculum options in middle and high schools in the state, as well as the number of students demonstrating achievement in such options, as measured by International Baccalaureate (IB), CLEP and AP. The program serves "as a liaison between teachers, schools, and districts, and the IB, AP or ACT agencies that provide resources for rigorous school-wide curriculum and increase teacher performance."
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Arizona Virtual Academy offers AP courses.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Options for Excellence Web site
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Scholarship: Department Web page
Collaboration: Options for Excellence Web site
Encouraging access: Arizona Virtual Academy Web site

Arkansas
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings Yes. Beginning with the 2008-2009 school year, all high schools must offer at least 4 AP courses, adding at least 1 core course each year. In addition, beginning with the 2008-2009 school year, all districts must offer 1 AP course in each of 4 areas: English, math, science and social studies. These offerings must be phased in over a 4-year period beginning in the 2005-2006 school year. Unlike districts, however, high schools are not required to offer courses in specific subject areas.

Districts must also offer pre-AP courses. "In order to prepare students for the rigor inherent in AP courses, it is recommended to begin with the 2004-2005 school year by offering Pre-AP courses to prepare students for the demands of AP coursework. Aligned with the four (4) required AP courses, the Pre-AP courses will be fully operational by the 2008-2009 school year." A district pre-AP program must follow a clearly recognizable sequence, i.e., 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th grade pre-AP English, 11th grade AP English Language and Composition, 12th grade English Literature and Composition.

Statute exempts any high school offering the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program from the requirement to offer AP and pre-AP courses. However, in practice in the state, high schools offering IB are also expected to meet the AP offering mandates of non-IB high schools.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. Schools offering AP courses may apply for a one-time equipment and instructional materials grant for each AP course. In addition, depending on availability of funds, schools may be awarded up to $50 for a score of 3 or higher on any AP test. Funds must be used in the schools' AP program. Schools must annually submit a report to the Arkansas Department of Education with detailed expenditures of funds awarded for students' AP test scores.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. Districts must annually report by grade level, economic status and ethnicity the number of students taking AP courses, the number taking AP exams, and the percent of students scoring a 3, 4 or 5 on AP exams.

In addition, the commissioner of education is authorized to require every district superintendent to file a written statement with the Arkansas Department of Education that the district is in compliance with § 6-16-1201 et seq. concerning advanced placement.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. At least once every 5 years, AP teachers must attend a College Board Advanced Placement Summer Institute, and pre-AP teachers must attend a College Board sponsored or endorsed training institute or workshop in the teacher's content area. An AP or pre-AP teacher who does not complete this requirement will complete an Additional Training Plan (ATP) for AP or pre-AP, and will have 3 years to complete the training. AP and pre-AP teachers may receive up to $650 each to cover cost of tuition, expenses and materials of approved training programs. Priority given to teachers who have not previously been trained. A teacher assigned to teach more than one AP or pre-AP area (i.e., biology, chemistry, etc.) may apply for more than one teacher training stipend.

In addition, a student may receive a weighted grade in an AP course only if the AP course teacher meets Arkansas teacher licensure requirements and either (1) Attends a College Board AP Summer Institute at least once every 5 years or (2) Completes an additional training plan for AP within 3 years of beginning the additional training plan; or meets Arkansas teacher licensure requirements and attends the training required by the organization.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. State authorized to pay AP test fee in full or on pro rata basis.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. AP courses may be taught by employees of postsecondary institutions who meet the qualification requirements of that institution or the Department of Workforce Education and are teaching a credit-bearing course in an institution of higher education or a technical institute. Such instructors do not need to be certified to teach at the secondary level, but do need to attend College Board-approved summer institutes as do regular high school AP teachers.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Legislation establishes the state's intent to make distance learning available in every district, partly to provide districts with access to AP courses and other curricula not otherwise available. The Arkansas Virtual High School fulfills this intent, offering AP courses in English literature, U.S. history and world history, as of fall 2007.

In addition, all districts must offer pre-AP courses by the 2008-2009 school year. The Arkansas Department of Education must approve all pre-AP courses. State board regulations specify, "When a district offers a Pre-Advanced Placement program, the courses must follow a clearly recognizable sequence, i.e., 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th grade Pre-Advanced Placement English, 11th grade AP English Language and Composition, and 12th grade English Literature and Composition."

Pre-AP teachers must attend training sponsored or endorsed by the College Board, which may include vertical team training. The state makes available grants of up to $650 per pre-AP teacher to cover the costs of tuition, expenses and materials of approved training programs.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit Yes. Student must take AP course and exam to receive weighted course credit.
Sources Offering mandated: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-1204, 6-16-1206; Arkansas Department of Education Rules for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program and Rules Governing Advanced Placement Courses in the Four Core Areas in Arkansas High Schools; Ann Biggers, Arkansas Department of Education
Financial incentives: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-804; Arkansas Department of Education Rules for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program and Rules Governing Advanced Placement Courses in the Four Core Areas in Arkansas High Schools
Accountability incentives: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-202, 6-15-2006
Teacher training: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-902, 6-16-804, 6-16-1203; Arkansas Department of Education Rules for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program and Rules Governing Advanced Placement Courses in the Four Core Areas in Arkansas High Schools
Testing fees: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-804; Arkansas Department of Education Rules for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program and Rules Governing Advanced Placement Courses in the Four Core Areas in Arkansas High Schools
Collaboration: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-17-309
Encouraging access: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-47-501, 6-16-1203 and -1204; Arkansas Virtual High School Web site; Arkansas Department of Education Rules for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program and Rules Governing Advanced Placement Courses in the Four Core Areas in Arkansas High Schools
Credit for minimum scores: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-65-222
Course credit: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-15-902

California
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. Every school accountability report card must include the number of AP courses offered, by subject.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The High School Mathematics Professional Development Institutes are to provide instruction in the teaching of math in a manner consistent with the standard for a comprehensive research-based math instruction program. Institutes must provide instruction in topics commonly found in high school math courses, including, but not limited to, geometry, algebra II, trigonometry, and calculus, that will enhance the ability of teachers to prepare students for state math assessments, the California High School Exit Exam, and AP and college coursework.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A state program (repeals January 2013) awards grants to districts to cover the AP test fees of economically disadvantaged students, defined as any of the following: students whose household income does not exceed 200% of the federal poverty level; and students eligible for free/reduced lunch. Any economically disadvantaged student enrolled in an AP course may apply to the district for a grant. A student receiving a grant pays $5 of the exam fee.

Any district may apply for grant funds, based on the number of economically disadvantaged students in the district enrolled in AP courses who will take the next offered AP exams. If the total district applications exceed the funds available, the California Department of Education must prorate the grants based on the ratio of the total amount requested to the total amount budgeted by the state. Districts and county superintendents of schools are allowed to form collaboratives or consortia to participate in the grant program. Statute likewise directs the department to obtain federal funding to support AP test fees prior to expending state funds.

In addition, parents and students in districts applying for grant funds must be notified of the availability of state funds to cover the costs of economically disadvantaged students' AP exam fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The Regents of the University of California have developed the High School Mathematics Professional Development Institutes, in collaboration with the Trustees of California State University and the independent colleges and universities. The institutes are to provide instruction on math pedagogy, including instruction in topics commonly found in high school math courses, that will increase teachers' ability to prepare students for the state achievement test, the high school exit exam, and AP and college coursework.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The first priority for use of Education Technology Grant Program funds is ensure that high school pupils in schools offering 3 or fewer AP courses have access to AP courses online. Grants awarded for the first priority may be expended to purchase or lease computers and related equipment and for wiring or infrastructure necessary to achieve connectivity to online AP courses in classroom, library, or technology and media centers. CTAP and the California Department of Education were mandated in October 2000 to provide the Secretary for Education with a report identifying high schools offering 3 or fewer AP courses, and in need of hardware, infrastructure or wiring to provide connectivity for on-line classes. CTAP was required to work with districts and eligible schools to determine whether individual school sites plan to provide AP courses via technology, and required to report on the hardware, infrastructure and wiring necessary to bring eligible schools online AP courses. Participating districts were to file an "End of Grant Expenditure Report/Certification of Completion" with CTAP no later than thirty days after completion of the installation, and not later than March 1, 2002.

In addition, the University of California College Prep Online offers numerous AP courses, as well as AP exam prep. AP courses are $325 per student per semester, although volume discounts for schools or programs are available. Students may pay for courses themselves or the school may cover the cost.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 33126
Teacher training: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 99222
Testing fees: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 48980, 52240-52244; Department Web site
Collaboration: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 99222
Encouraging access: CAL. EDUC. CODE § 52270, CAL. CODE REGS. tit. 5, § 90001-90008; University of California College Prep Online Web site
Credit for minimum scores: CAL. CODE REGS. tit. 5, § 55753.7

Colorado
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. District accreditation indicators include (1) Number of students taking one or more AP exams; (2) Number of students enrolled in AP classes; (3) The percentage of those students obtaining a passing grade on an AP exam as defined in the accreditation contract.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A federal grant provides test fee subsidies for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Colorado Online Learning (COL), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, was initially launched as a 14-district consortium of rural, suburban and urban districts in Colorado. According to the COL Web site, "All of Colorado’s public school districts or private schools are entitled to enroll students. No membership fee is required." COL offers AP courses, and partners with Aventa Learning to provide additional AP coursework. Colorado students pay $300 per course per semester; out-of-state students pay an additional $50 per course per semester. According to the program Web site, "Most districts pay the course fee on behalf of students; however, some pass the full or partial fee on to students."
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: COLO. REV. STAT. ANN. § 22-11-104; 1 COLO. CODE REGS. § 301-1
Testing fees: Colorado Department of Education Web site
Encouraging access: Colorado Online Learning Web site

Connecticut
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. According to the Connecticut State Department of Education Web site, Connecticut provides state funds for AP teacher professional development.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the Connecticut State Department of Education Web site, the state will cover the exam fees of low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Department Web site
Testing fees: Department Web site

Delaware
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. In 2005, the Delaware Department of Education formed a partnership with districts to help cover costs for AP teachers to attend the Lewes AP Summer Institute in the state. Through the partnership, the Department covers half the registration fee, with the district paying the remaining balance. Eighty-six teachers participated in the partnership in 2006.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers testing fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP The Department of Education Web site indicates that some districts in the state have partnered with APEX Learning to make AP courses available through distance learning.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Mercedes Ferrari, Delaware Department of Education
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: Department Web page

District of Columbia
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the District will cover low-income students' test fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site

Florida
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. For every student in each AP course who scores 3 or higher on the prior year's exam, a district is calculated a .24 full-time equivalent (FTE) student membership, to be added to the to the total FTE student membership for grades 9-12 for the subsequent fiscal year. Districts must allocate at least 80% of these funds to the high school generating the funds. The district must award to each AP teacher a $50 bonus for each AP student he/she instructed who received a 3 or higher on the AP exam. Districts must award "an additional bonus of $500" to each AP teacher in a school with a "D" or "F" accountability rating who has at least one student scoring 3 or higher on the AP exam, "regardless of the number of classes taught or of the number of students scoring a 3 or higher on the" AP exam. Teacher bonuses under either designation may not exceed $2,000 in a school year and must "be in addition to any regular wage or other bonus the teacher received or is scheduled to receive."

In addition, the merit award program for instructional staff and school-based administrators requires participating districts to administer an end-of-course assessment to measure student achievement. AP exams may be used for this purpose.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement is mandated to provide AP and other advanced course teachers with training and professional development in content knowledge and instructional skills. The partnership must annually report to the Florida Department of Education the number of teachers trained and the effectiveness of the training.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. State subsidizes AP test fees regardless of whether student achieves passing score on the exam.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. "The levels of postsecondary education shall collaborate in further developing and providing articulated programs in which students can proceed toward their educational objectives as rapidly as their circumstances permit." Advanced placement is one of the time-shortened educational programs on which collaboration is mandated.

In addition, districts, community colleges and state universities are authorized to conduct AP instruction within dual enrollment courses.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Florida Virtual School, the country’s first statewide Internet-based public high school, offers AP courses at no cost to Florida residents. AP courses for nonresidents are $800.

In addition, all high schools must provide all 10th graders with access to the PSAT or PLAN (Preliminary ACT). Test results provide each high school with a database that guidance counselors use to identify students who are ready to or who need more preparation to be successful in AP courses.

The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement is also directed to "provide a plan for communication and coordination of efforts with the Florida Virtual School's provision of online AP or other advanced courses." The partnership must annually report on "the effectiveness of the delivered services and activities ... [in] raising student achievement and increasing the number of AP or other advanced course examinations in low-performing middle and high schools."
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1011.62, 1012.225
Teacher training: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.35
Testing fees: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.27
Collaboration: . STAT. ANN. § 1007.22, § 1007.272
Encouraging access: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.35, Florida Virtual School Web site
Credit for minimum scores: FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.27, FLA. ADMIN. CODE ANN. r. 6A-10.024

Georgia
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training The Georgia Department of Education provides workshops for teachers, counselors and administrators on PSAT, AP and SAT. However, the workshops appear to provide information about AP rather than content and pedagogical techniques.

In 2006, the state board made a competitive grant available to districts to support AP teacher training during the summer of 2006 for teachers in schools that offered the least number of AP courses during the 2005-2006 school year. Up to $2,500 per teacher was available to cover costs of training expenses, including registration, travel, lodging and a $1,000 participation stipend.

In addition, funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to provide professional development for AP teachers, administrators and counselors in select schools and districts with high concentrations of low-income and minority students.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Statute directs the state department of education to cover test fees. In addition, a portion of Georgia's Phase II Honor State grant from the National Governors Association is being used to supplement the state's AP exam fee stipends in participating schools.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Georgia Virtual School, administered by the Georgia Department of Education, offers AP courses in a variety of subjects. Courses taken as part of a student's regular daily class schedule are free to public, private and home school students. Summer and supplemental courses taken in addition to the regular school day are $300 per semester or $600 per year.

In 2006, the state board made a competitive grant available to districts to support AP teacher training during the summer of 2006 for teachers in schools that offered the least number of AP courses during the 2005-2006 school year.

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to increase AP offerings and quality in targeted low-income/high minority schools. The NGA strategy includes expanding AP courses, AP professional development for teachers, administrators and counselors, preparing students in the middle grades for AP rigor, and using the PSAT to measure AP potential.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Department Web page; GA. COMP. R. & REGS. R. 160-1-4-.270; Web site
Testing fees: GA. CODE ANN. § 20-2-161.1; National Governors Association Web site
Encouraging access: Georgia Virtual School Web site; GA. CODE ANN. § 20-2-319.1; GA. COMP. R. & REGS. r. 160-8-1-.01, 160-1-4-.270; National Governors Association Web site

Hawaii
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, Hawaii pays $47 per exam for low-income students, requiring students to pay $5.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. As of fall 2006, the Hawaii Department of Education's E-School offers AP Computer Science, U.S. History and World History. Courses taken during the regular school day are free; courses taken during the summer are fee-based.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: E-School Web site

Idaho
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No, although effective with the 2007-2008 school year, all high schools must either offer "advanced opportunities," (defined as AP courses, dual credit courses, Tech Prep, or IB programs), "or provide opportunities for students to take courses at the postsecondary campus."
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers test fees for low-income public and private school students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. "Dual credit may be granted for Advanced Placement, College Level Examination Program, or Tech Prep class offerings that are approved through an accredited institution of higher education."
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) offers a variety of AP courses. All IDLA fees are paid by the district directly to IDLA. As of the 2006-2007 school year, a one-semester course costs $50 (plus a $25 one-time nonrefundable registration fee) for public school students in buildings and/or districts with a Site Coordinator who has successfully completed the Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) Site Coordinator Class prior to the course start date. Students in schools and/or districts in which the site coordinator has not completed the IDLA Site Coordinator Class pay $100 per semester per course (plus the one-time $25 registration fee). The cost of each course per semester is $300 for out-of-state, private school and adult learner students. IDLA students must, however, cover their own AP exam fees.

2006 H.B. 847 allocated $1,100,000 to the Idaho Digital Learning Academy. $200,000 was to be used to reduce or eliminate tuition charged students. Any remaining funds from the $200,000 were to be used to provide AP coursework.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: IDAPA 08.02.03, subsections 007.01 and 106
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Collaboration: IDAPA 55.01.03.005
Encouraging access: Web site; 2006 H.B. 847, Section 9

Illinois
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No. However, the state board must "encourage" districts to offer rigorous courses in grades 6-11 to prepare students for AP coursework. In addition, 2005 legislation directs the state board to "seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement Incentive Program and the Math-Science Partnership Program ... and to support the implementation of an integrated instructional program for students in grades 6 through 12 in reading, writing, and mathematics that prepares all students for enrollment and success in Advanced Placement courses and in college."
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Legislation directs AP teachers to obtain appropriate training and the state board to "establish clear, specific and challenging training guidelines" requiring AP teachers to obtain College Board-endorsed AP training. AP training for AP and pre-AP teachers "must do all of the following: (1) Provide teachers of Advanced Placement and teachers in courses that lead to Advanced Placement with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement courses and examinations and other advanced course examinations and mastery of postsecondary course content. (2) Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective Advanced Placement programs in their schools. (3) Provide middle grade, junior high, and high school teachers with Advanced Placement Vertical Team training and other Pre-Advanced Placement professional development that prepares students for success in Advanced Placement courses. (4) Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6 through 12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and mathematics that prepares all students for enrollment and success in Advanced Placement courses and in college."

2005 legislation also directs the state board to "seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement Incentive Program and the Math-Science Partnership Program and use it to support Advanced Placement and Pre-Advanced Placement teacher professional development...."
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The state covers low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Illinois Virtual High School offers AP courses. Course fees for the 2006-2007 school year are $225 per semester enrollment; scholarships are available to both schools and individuals.

In addition, the state board's technology immersion pilot project provides a wireless laptop computer to each student, teacher, and relevant administrator in a participating school and implement the use of software, on-line courses, and other appropriate learning technologies. One of the 5 criteria the board must consider in selecting 7 participating school districts is limited access to AP courses. The 3-year pilot ends August 31, 2007.

2005 legislation on AP teacher training and curricula likewise directs the state board to "focus State and federal funding with the intent to carry out activities that target school districts serving high concentrations of low-income students." The February 2006 RFP indicates that grant awards average $100,000, with up to $40,000 allocated to any individual school.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: 2005 S.B. 574 (Public Act 094-0534)
Teacher training: 2005 S.B. 574 (Public Act 094-0534)
Testing fees: Department Web site
Encouraging access: 105 ILL. COMP. STAT. ANN. 5/2-3.135; 2005 S.B. 574 (Public Act 094-0534); Illinois Virtual High School Web site

Indiana
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings Yes. Each high school must provide at least two AP courses to qualified students. In addition, each district must provide science and math AP courses.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. Out of funds appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program, the state gives third and fourth priority (out of five) to paying school districts for instructional materials needed for AP math and science courses, and paying for or renting equipment a district may need to develop an AP math or science course. The state gives fifth priority to paying fees for the costs incurred in implementing AP programs in subjects other than math and science.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. Districts' annual performance reports must include the percentage of students taking AP tests and the percentage of students scoring a 3 or higher on the tests. In addition, as part of the state accountability system, the state board is directed to establish criteria for the exemplary and commendable categories for required improvement in three indicators, one of which is AP test scores "expressed as a percentage of the members of a particular graduating class."
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Out of funds appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program, the state gives second priority (out of five) to paying for math and science AP teachers to attend College Board summer training institutes.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Of five AP activities the legislature funds, statute gives first priority in AP program appropriations to covering public school students' AP math and science exam fees. In covering these exam fees, the state gives first priority to those math and science AP exams taken by students in grades 11 and 12. A Department document clarifies which math/science AP exam fees are covered by state funds (not limited to low-income students) and which are covered by federal funds for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The state board is authorized to approve AP courses offered by a public postsecondary institution in collaboration with a district if the postsecondary institution and the district demonstrate to the state board that the particular advanced placement course satisfies the objectives of the state's AP program, which "is established to encourage students to pursue advanced courses, particularly in math and science."
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. In distributing funds to cover student test fees, teacher training stipends, instructional materials and equipment and other program needs, the department must adopt guidelines to ensure that AP program funds are distributed as evenly as possible throughout the state. In establishing these distribution guidelines, the Department must "consider the following factors:
(1) The number of students and teachers participating in the program.
(2) Even geographic representation.
(3) Financial need of students participating in the program.
(4) Any other factor affecting the distribution of money" in the state AP program.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, effective with the Class of 2010, two of the 6 additional measures required to earn a Core 40 diploma with academic honors are to complete 2 AP courses and the related AP exams, or a combination of dual enrollment credit and 1 AP course and exam.
Sources Offering mandated: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-30-10-4, § 20-36-3-5
Financial incentives: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-36-3-8
Accountability incentives: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-20-8-8; IND. ADMIN. CODE tit. 511, r. 6.2-6-6
Teacher training: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-36-3-7, 20-36-3-8
Testing fees: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-36-3-8
Collaboration: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-36-3-5
Encouraging access: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-36-3-8
Credit for minimum scores: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-36-3-11
Course credit: IND. ADMIN. CODE tit. 511, r. 6-7.1-6

Iowa
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Statute establishes an AP summer program at the state university of Iowa to train AP teachers. The university is "responsible for the development of appropriate curricula, course offerings, provision of qualified instructors, and the selection of participants for the program. If funds are appropriated for the program, those funds shall be used to pay for the cost of providing instructors, counselors, room and board for students and teachers attending the program, [and] materials...." If funds appropriated are not sufficient to meet program participation demands, first priority must be given to teachers from schools that do not have AP programs.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers AP exam fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. A summer AP program is held at the state university of Iowa to provide high school students with intensive coursework. The university is "responsible for the development of appropriate curricula, course offerings, provision of qualified instructors, and the selection of participants for the program. If funds are appropriated for the program, those funds shall be used to pay for the cost of providing instructors, counselors, room and board for students ... attending the program, materials, and for the cost of the development of a summer advanced placement exam." If funds are appropriated for the program, those funds shall be used to pay for the cost of providing instructors, counselors, room and board for students and teachers attending the program, [and] materials...." If funds appropriated are not sufficient to meet program participation demands, first priority must be given to students from schools that do not have AP programs.

The Iowa Online AP Academy (IOAPA) at the University of Iowa offers AP courses. According to the IOAPA Web site, the academy "covers the costs for Apex online Advanced Placement Courses ($450 for tuition and required materials) for students in schools registered with IOAPA."

In 2005, the state was awarded a three-year Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) grant by the U.S. Department of Education. Program activities will provide program supports especially for low-income and minority students.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: IOWA CODE ANN. § 263.8C
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Access: IOWA CODE ANN. § 263.8C; Iowa Online AP Academy Web site; University of Iowa Web site

Kansas
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' AP test fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site

Kentucky
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No, although each high school is mandated to "offer a core curriculum of advanced placement, International Baccalaureate, dual enrollment, or dual credit courses, using either or both on-site instruction or electronic instruction through the Kentucky Virtual High School or other on-line alternatives."
State provides financial incentives for AP courses The state board was directed in 2002 to "compare the costs of offering advanced placement courses through traditional on-site instruction, the Kentucky Virtual High School, and other methods and ... offer each school district assistance, if requested, in analyzing how the school district can most cost-effectively offer the largest number of advanced placement courses...."
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. Once the statewide student database is implemented, each high school and district's accountability report card must include a list "a list of the advanced placement subjects offered by grade, the total number of students enrolled in each advanced placement class, and these enrollments disaggregated by gender, race, and free and reduced lunch participation. The number of students who take the advanced placement tests and the average advanced placement examination scores by subject [must] be disaggregated by gender, race, and free and reduced lunch participation...."

In addition, in calculating a school's academic indices, a bonus point must "be added to the transition to adult life calculation for each graduate who" earns a "3" or higher on 3 AP exams. 
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Statute directs the state board, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, by December 31, 2002, to
(1) expand AP teacher training institutes, "including offering advanced placement teacher training instruction and assistance through the Kentucky Virtual High School or in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education through the Kentucky Virtual University;" and
(2) require teachers planning to participate in the AP teacher training and complete such training at Department-facilitated AP institutes to sign an agreement to teach at least 1 AP course in a public school or the Kentucky Virtual High School when assigned by the school principal.

Each high school is required to have a policy on recruiting and assigning students to AP courses. The policy must ensure teachers assigned to AP courses are "certified in the appropriate content area and prepared through professional development to teach the advanced placement course."

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to provide professional development to AP teachers, administrators and counselors in select schools in the state with high minority and/or low-income student populations.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' testing fees. In addition, the department of education offers scholarships to students taking an AP course through the Kentucky Virtual High School. Scholarships may be used to cover the cost of tuition, materials, test preparation and the exam fee.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. 2002 legislation directs the state board to identify, in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education, "resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward advanced placement or dual enrollment instruction...."
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Each high school’s school-based decision making council is mandated to establish a policy on how students are recruited for and assigned to AP courses. The policy must recognize “that all students have the right to be academically challenged and should be encouraged to participate in these courses.” The policy must additionally:
"(1) Provide equitable access for participation in advanced placement courses for all students using either or both on-site instruction or electronic instruction, including the Kentucky Virtual High School;
(2) Provide for sharing information with all students through the individual graduation plan process … and other means regarding the benefits of taking advanced placement courses and advanced placement examinations including the potential for earning college credit;
(3) Establish an equitable process for recruitment of underrepresented students in advanced placement courses including: (a) Racial minorities; (b) Students with limited English proficiency; (c) Students who qualify for free and reduced lunch; (d) Students with disabilities; and (e) Males or females...."

The Kentucky Virtual Advanced Placement Academy, housed within the Kentucky Virtual High School, offers students access to a core AP curriculum. The Kentucky Virtual High School charges course fees to recover costs--$150 for a one-semester AP course, or $300 for a two-semester AP course. Statute mandates that districts pay the tuition and other costs of Kentucky Virtual High School courses taken during the regular school day. The department of education offers a scholarship to cover AP courses taken through the Kentucky Virtual High School. Priority in awarding scholarships is given low-income and minority students. The Kentucky Virtual High School likewise provides curriculum for the Barren Academy of Virtual and Expanded Learning (BAVEL), the first accredited school in the state to operate only online.

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to increase AP offerings and quality in targeted low-income/high minority schools. The NGA strategy includes expanding AP courses; AP professional development for teachers, administrators and counselors; preparing students in the middle grades for AP rigor, and using the PSAT to measure AP potential. Activities are being conducted in one urban and one rural district, in three high schools in each district.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 160.348
Financial incentives: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 158.622
Accountability incentives: 703 KY. ADMIN. REGS. 5:140, 5:020
Teacher training: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 158.622; 704 KY. ADMIN. REGS. 3:510; National Governors Association Web site
Testing fees: College Board Web site; Department Web site
Collaboration: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 158.622
Encouraging access: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 158.622, 160.348; 704 KY. ADMIN. REGS. 3:510; Kentucky Virtual High School Web site; Department Web site; Barren Academy of Virtual and Expanded Learning (BAVEL) Web site; National Governors Association Web site
Credit for minimum score: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 164.098; 13 KY. ADMIN. REGS. 2:025

Louisiana
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No. However, the state data collection system may also provide for regular per-school collection of numbers of students in AP classes.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state will cover AP test fees for low-income students, and will cover $60 of the AP test fee for any student who is not low-income but who is enrolled in a Title I school.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Louisiana Virtual School offers AP European History, AP Psychology and AP U.S. History, as of August 2007. Courses are free, although schools must provide an onsite facilitator.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: LA. REV. STAT. ANN. § 17:3911
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: Louisiana Virtual School Web site

Maine
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to offer professional development for AP teachers, administrators and counselors in select schools and districts in the state.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' AP test fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to increase AP offerings and quality in targeted low-income/high minority schools. The NGA strategy includes expanding AP courses; AP professional development for teachers, administrators and counselors; preparing students in the middle grades for AP rigor, and using the PSAT in high schools statewide to measure AP potential.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: National Governors Association Web site
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: National Governors Association Web site

Maryland
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. State data system annually reports students taking AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the state covers $38.50 per AP exam for low-income students; students must cover the $13.50 not waived by the College Board.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities offers a number of AP courses. Course costs vary by course and by whether Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities or the local district provides a qualified teacher. Districts may offer scholarships or local funding to cover a student's course costs.

In addition, in 2005 the state received a three-year Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) grant from the U.S. Department of Education. APIP grants are intended to increase the AP opportunities of low-income students.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: MD. REGS. CODE tit. 13A, § 01.04.04
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities Web site; U.S. Department of Education Web site

Massachusetts
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. "Subject to appropriation, the board shall establish a grant program which shall award grants to school districts for the costs associated with establishing advanced placement courses. The board shall promulgate regulations defining the standards of eligibility and other implementation guidelines."
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Through the state's Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the state offers summer AP Teacher Institutes to teachers in high schools in which at least 40% of students qualify for free or reduced lunch. According to the 2006 materials, "Scholarships will cover course and lab fees and on-campus housing for teachers traveling 60 or more miles from home to the Fitchburg State College campus. Students must pay the cost of graduate credits attempted."
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. "Subject to appropriation, the board shall establish an advanced placement test fee grant program which shall award grants to school districts for the reimbursement of application fees for students based on financial need in order to assist students with paying the fee for advanced placement tests. The board shall promulgate regulations defining the standards of eligibility and other implementation guidelines for this program." According to the College Board Web site, the state covers $42 per AP exam for low-income students; students pay the remaining $10 not waived by the College Board.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores Yes. A candidate for the Certificate of Mastery must attain minimum scores on one of the following sets of assessments:
(a) Two SAT II exams;
(b) Two AP exams;
(c) One SAT II exam and one AP exam;
(d) One SAT II exam and one Other Achievement; or
(e) One AP exam and one Other Achievement.

Students must earn at least a 3 on an AP exam or a "score on an SAT II exam determined by the Department to be comparable to a score of three on an AP exam where there exist SAT II and AP exams in the same subject area." Students earning a Certificate of Mastery receive a tuition waiver to state postsecondary institutions for up to 8 semesters, provided students maintain a minimum 3.3 GPA.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: MASS. GEN. LAWS. ANN. ch. 69, § 1D
Teacher training: Department Web site
Testing fees: MASS. GEN. LAWS. ANN. ch. 69, § 1D; College Board Web site
Scholarship: MASS. GEN. LAWS. ANN. ch. 69, § 1D; MASS. REGS. CODE tit. 603, § 31.04; Massachusetts Department of Education Web site

Michigan
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. If a district wants all of its schools to be accredited, it must submit an annual report for each school to the state board. The report must include:
(1) The number of "college level equivalent courses" (including Advanced Placement and IB courses) offered in the school and district
(2) The number and percentage of students enrolled in at least 1 AP or IB course during the previous school year
(3) The number and percentage of these students who took an AP or IB exam
(4) The number and percentage whose score on the exam was at or above the level recommended by the testing service for college credit.

The state department of education is required to submit a report to the legislature, "aggregated for statewide and intermediate school district totals, using the information submitted by school districts."

Schools in the district must also distribute the annual education report to the public at an open meeting each year.
State programs and funding for teacher training According to the department of education Web site, various institutions in the state provide summer AP teacher institutes. However, ECS was unable to identify state programs to cover teacher participation costs.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The department of education covers testing fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Michigan Virtual High School (MVHS) offers a number of AP courses. As of August 2006, each AP course costs $350 a semester. Schools may buy "seats" in MVHS courses, or schools may ask parents to purchase a course for a student.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: David Wakelyn, National Governors Association
Accountability incentives: MICH. COMP. LAWS ANN. § 380.1204a
Teacher training: Department Web site
Testing fees: Department document
Encouraging access: Michigan Virtual High School Web site

Minnesota
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. In the 2006-2007 school year, the department of education is reimbursing school $1,000 for offering a new AP course. Funds may be used for such classroom resources as textbooks, lab equipment or supplementary materials. 

A competitive grant program is designed to expand AP and pre-AP course offerings. Grant awards may not exceed the lesser of $85 times the number of students enrolled at the participating sites on October 1 of the previous fiscal year, or the approved supplemental expenditures set out in the grant application. Funding may be used to:
(1) Provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, in pre-AP and AP programs
(2) Further develop pre-AP and AP courses or programs
(3) Improve the transition between grade levels to help students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, succeed in pre-AP and AP programs
(4) Buy books and supplies
(5) Pay course or program fees
(6) Increase student participation and success in pre-AP and AP programs
(7) Expand student access to pre-AP or AP courses or programs through online learning
(8) Hire appropriately licensed personnel to teach additional AP programs
(9) Engage in other activity directly related to expanding student access, participation and success in pre-AP and AP courses or programs, including low-income and other disadvantaged students.

Any group of districts that meets specified criteria may apply for an incentive grant for construction of a new secondary facility or for remodeling and improving an existing secondary facility. Among the 11 criteria the proposed facility must meet is "an education program is developed that provides for more learning opportunities and course offerings, including the offering of advanced placement courses, for students than is currently available in any single member district...."
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No, although the state commissioner of education must annually report to the education committees of the legislature the number of students enrolled in IB courses in each district.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. "The state may pay a portion of the tuition, room, board, and out-of-state travel costs" for a teacher "or other interested educator" to participate in a College Board training program. The commissioner is responsible for selecting teachers to participate in the training program, and determining the amount of the subsidy. The commissioner procedures must, to the extent possible, ensure the availability of AP courses in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in districts.

In addition, the commissioner must "provide support programs during the school year for teachers who attended the training programs and teachers experienced in teaching" AP courses. The support program must "provide teachers with opportunities to share instructional ideas with other teachers. The state may pay the costs of participating in the support programs, including substitute teachers if necessary, and program affiliation costs."

Funds from the competitive grant program to expand AP access may be used for teacher training to better serve students, "including low-income and other disadvantaged students," participating in AP and pre-AP programs, or to "hire appropriately licensed personnel to teach additional" AP courses. Public and nonpublic AP teachers attending FY06 in-depth training in Minnesota are eligible for $625 scholarships to cover tuition and $100 to cover room and board. Teachers attending out-of-state training may have their expenses reimbursed up to $1,200.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The state must pay all exam fees for low-income students (as defined by the commissioner) in public and nonpublic schools, and, as legislative appropriation allows, "pay a portion or all" of the exam fees for other public and nonpublic students. In spring 2006, the state paid $52 per exam for low-income students and $60 per exam for non-low-income students.

Funds awarded through the state's competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand AP access may be used to pay course or program fees.

State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores Yes. The Achieve Scholarship offers up to $1,200 to high school graduates who completed a rigorous high school curriculum and meet various other criteria. One of the four means by which students may meet the "rigor" requirement is by completing at least AP or International Baccalaureate courses and scoring at least "3" on the AP exams or "4" on the IB exams.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. 2007 H.F. 1063 allocates fiscal year 2008 and 2009 funds to the University of Minnesota and Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to provie "academically rigorous educational opportunities," including AP and International Baccalaureate (IB) to students in remote and underserved areas where the district lacks the resources to provide such programs. Courses may be provided by high school or postsecondary staff, or via distance learning.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. In developing AP teacher training program procedures, the commissioner of education must, to the extent possible, ensure that AP courses "become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in school districts."

The state has a competitive grant program to increase student access to advanced placement. Proposals must seek to achieve one or more of the following goals:
(1) Increase the availability of AP courses or programs
(2) Expand the breadth of AP courses or programs available
(3) Increase the number and diversity of students who succeed in AP courses
(4) Increase low-income and other disadvantaged students' access to AP courses and programs
(5) Increase the number of students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who earn college credit by completing AP courses and earning sufficient scores on related exams.

The department of education likewise makes scholarship funds available for pre-AP teachers to attend training programs.

Furthermore, 2007 H.F. 1063 allocates fiscal year 2008 and 2009 funds to the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to provide "academically rigorous educational opportunities," including IB and Advanced Placement (AP). Courses may be delivered by a high school or postsecondary instructor or via distance learning.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: MINN. STAT. § 123A.443, 120B.132; Department memo
Accountability incentives: MINN. STAT. ANN. § 120B.13
Teacher training: MINN. STAT. § 120B.13, 120B.132; Department memo
Testing fees: MINN. STAT. § 120B.13, 120B.132; Department memo
Scholarship: Achieve Scholarship program Web page
Collaboration: 2007 H.F. 1063
Encouraging access: MINN. STAT. § 120B.13, 120B.132; Department memo; 2007 H.F. 1063
Credit for minimum scores: MINN. STAT. § 120B.13

Mississippi
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings Yes. Beginning with the 2007-2008 school year, all public high schools must offer at least 1 AP course in each of the core areas of English, math, science and social studies. Statute notes, however, that use of the state's online "Advanced Placement Instructional Program is an appropriate alternative for the delivery of" AP courses. A public high school offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program is exempt from this requirement.

In addition, all districts may offer pre-AP courses.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Statute directs the state board of education to "establish clear, specific and challenging training guidelines that require" AP and pre-AP teachers to obtain a recognized AP authority endorsed training. Beginning with the 2007-2008 school year, every AP teacher "must have completed the College Board endorsed AP Summer Institute (APSI) for the course and must have obtained the AP certification through the Mississippi Department of Education's Office of Educator Licensure. ... Teachers with the AP certification must comply with [AP] licensure renewal guidelines. AP teachers must complete the AP Summer Institute (APSI) at least every five years, which can be used for licensure renewal if completed during the validity period." An exception is provided for teachers who have served with the Educational Testing Service as AP exam readers. Board regulations likewise require that, beginning in the 2007-2008 school year, a district offering pre-AP courses to submit a pre-Advanced Placement Program Proposal to the state department of education. The proposal must indicate the College Board training pre-AP teachers will receive. "Each teacher planning to teach a pre-AP course must have completed the College Board's pre-AP Summer Institute, Vertical Teams Training, the pre-AP Workshop, or other training specifically designed for pre-AP teachers. The district is responsible for providing documentation (when requested) of participation in the pre-AP training."
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The department of education subsidizes low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Mississippi Virtual School (MVS), administered by the Mississippi Department of Education, offers a variety of free AP courses. Courses are available to all students in grades 9-12, although priority is given to juniors and seniors.

In addition, districts may offer pre-AP courses in math, science, language arts and social studies to prepare students for AP coursework. Effective wtih the 2007-2008 school year, a district offering pre-AP courses must submit a proposal to the state department of education indicating the pre-AP courses to be offered, the College Board training pre-AP teachers will receive and the process for identifying students for pre-AP courses. Pre-AP teachers must obtain College Board-sponsored training. The pre-AP program proposal will be approved for a five-year period. Subject to appropriation, an exam must be made available to all sophomores in the 2007-2008 school year to measure students' ability to succeed in an AP course. "The examination results should be used to identify students who were not recognized during middle school as students who would benefit from taking AP courses." Legislation directs the Department to seek federal funds through the Advanced Placement Incentive Grant Program for this purpose, and to focus funding efforts to increase AP and pre-AP offerings in "districts targeted as serving a high concentration of low-income students."

Legislation likewise provides that, subject to appropriation, funding must "be made available for the 2007-2008 school year so that all sophomores in Mississippi's public schools may take an examination that measures the students' ability to succeed in an advanced placement course. The State Department of Education shall seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement Incentive Grant Program and other available funding for this purpose. Funding efforts must be focused with an intent to carry out advanced placement and pre-advanced placement activities in school districts targeted as serving a high concentration of low-income students." However, as of February 2007, funding has not been appropriated for this purpose.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-39; CMSR 36-000-113 (Mississippi State Board Policy Manual Code 2903)
Teacher training: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-39; CMSR 36-000-113 (Mississippi State Board Policy Manual Code 2903)
Testing fees: Department Web site
Encouraging access: Mississippi Virtual School Web site; MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-39; CMSR 36-000-113 (Mississippi State Board Policy Manual Code 2903)

Missouri
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. The "Incentives for School Excellence Program," a matching fund program of variable match rates, includes AP programs as one of the 11 program topics suitable for obtaining matching funds.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. The department of elementary and secondary education must have a scoring rubric for AP courses as part of the Missouri school improvement program. The rubric, which must recognize the difficulty of providing such courses in rural districts, must "[take] into account population density in districts and localized teacher shortages in academic specializations, and differentially [reward] districts for accomplishing delivery of such courses through electronic media under such circumstances."
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state funds AP teacher training sites at 2 universities in the state.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. To be eligible under "the Missouri Fee Payment Program, "students must be enrolled in an approved course, plan to take the appropriate exam and have either scored proficient or advanced on the same content area section of the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) test." Policy also clarifies that for a student to be eligible under the federal AP fee payment program, "students must be enrolled in an approved course, plan to take the appropriate exam and meet the federal definition of 'low income' ..., not to exceed 150% of the poverty level." The department of elementary and secondary education is also required to "establish a systematic process for identification and reporting the names of students eligible for aid to pay a portion of the cost of AP exam fees, ...; and an evaluation used to determine the effectiveness of the program as a whole and the program's impact upon participating students."
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Missouri Virtual School offers AP courses. The school sets per-course semester fees on a sliding scale based on the number of students enrolled in the course. Tuition is paid by the local school district.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: MO. ANN. STAT. § 160.264
Accountability incentives: MO. ANN. STAT. § 161.101
Teacher training: Truman State University Web site; Southeast Missouri State University Web site
Testing fees: MO. CODE REGS. ANN. tit. 5, § 50-200.050
Encouraging access: Missouri Virtual School Web site

Montana
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The office of public instruction offers Advanced Placement Incentive Program grants to support AP teacher training and online teacher training to AP and pre-AP instructors in high schools and middle schools whose student population is at least 40% free- and reduced-lunch eligible. A high school or middle school may also be eligible for a grant if the student population at the feeder elementary school is at least 40% free/reduced lunch.
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. As part of the Montana Educational Telecommunications Network, the superintendent of public instruction is required to "[coordinate] with the commissioner of higher education and the units of the Montana university system to offer advanced placement courses, teacher inservice training, and other instruction through the network...."
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. One of the stated objectives of the Montana Educational Telecommunications Network is to offer AP courses. In addition, the office of public instruction awards Advanced Placement Incentive Program grants for online AP course delivery to high schools and middle schools in districts whose student population is at least 40% free- and reduced-lunch eligible. A high school or middle school may also be eligible for a grant if the student population at the feeder elementary school is at least 40% free/reduced lunch. If no school in a district is eligible, a district may also receive grant funds to cover the costs of online AP courses for individual low-income students.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Montana Office of Public Instruction Web site
Collaboration: MONT. CODE ANN. § 20-32-102
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: MONT. CODE ANN. § 20-32-102; Office of Public Instruction Web site

Nebraska
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Not for all students, and not explicitly regarding AP. Districts are required to report "the number of identified high ability learners participating in" AP courses or honors level course work.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: NEB. ADMIN. CODE Title 92, Ch. 3
Testing fees: College Board Web site

Nevada
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training National Governors Association (NGA) and federal Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) funds are used to help cover AP teacher training costs in targeted minority and low-income schools. NGA funds are likewise being used to train counselors and administrators about the AP program, recruit more minority teachers to teach AP and encourage high school students to become teachers.
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers all but $10 of low-income students' AP testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Clark County School District Virtual High School Program offers a variety of AP courses. Courses are open not only to any student in grades 9-12 enrolled in the Clark County [Las Vegas] School District who meets the course prerequisites, but also to charter and private school students in the Las Vegas area, and Nevada students whose district has signed an agreement with the Clark County School District. Courses are $100 for each half credit, although fee waivers are available.

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) and federal Advanced Placement Incentive Program (APIP) are being used to increase AP offerings and quality in targeted low-income/high minority schools. NGA strategy includes expanding AP courses, AP professional development for teachers, administrators and counselors, preparing students in the middle grades for AP rigor, and using the PSAT to measure AP potential. Nevada also will use the NGA funds to "make an effort to develop culturally diverse curricula to reach students of all backgrounds."
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: National Governors Association Web site; U.S. Department of Education Web site
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: Clark County School District Virtual High School Web site; National Governors Association Web site; U.S. Department of Education Web site

New Hampshire
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. Districts must annually report to the department of education, for each school and the district as a whole, the number of graduating students participating in AP programs. Data must be disaggregated as required by federal law. These data are included in the annual public report card, the "New Hampshire School District Profiles," and reported for the state as a whole as well as for individual districts and schools.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: N.H. REV. STAT. ANN. § 193-E3
Testing fees: College Board Web site

New Jersey
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. District report cards must indicate, both for the district as a whole and for each high school, the percentage of students in AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. By September 2005, all Abbott districts were required to create a planning team to address issues of greater academic rigor, personalization, and professional development, as well as implications for budget and facility needs. Each team is to address the essential components of the secondary education program, including "Instruction that engages students to produce both high quality work and increased student satisfaction. School districts shall survey student engagement and learning, and assess teachers' abilities to teach the content of the CCCS," including "[offering] all honors, advanced level courses, and Advanced Placement (AP) courses to all students who satisfy the prerequisites."
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: N.J. STAT. ANN. § 18A:7E-3
Testing fees: Web site
Encouraging access: N.J. ADMIN. CODE tit. 6A, § 10A-3.2

New Mexico
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. Districts and charters are authorized to develop core curriculum frameworks. Frameworks must include:
"(1) a curriculum that is aligned with state academic content and performance standards that is challenging, specific as to content and sequential from grade to grade, similar to a core curriculum sequence;
(2) in-depth professional development for teachers that includes vertical teaming in content areas; and
(3) content, materials and instructional strategies or methodologies that current research demonstrates are likely to lead to improved student achievement" in pre-AP and AP programs in grades 7-12. The public education department offers districts and charter schools grants to support core curriculum frameworks.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No. Districts must report to the public education department the number of students enrolled in AP courses, but districts are not required to include this information in public accountability report cards.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Districts and charter schools are authorized to develop "core curriculum frameworks to provide high quality curricula in kindergarten through grade six to prepare students for pre-advanced placement and advanced placement coursework in grades seven through twelve." A framework must include "in-depth professional development for teachers that includes vertical teaming in content areas," among other components. A district or charter school may apply to the public education department for a grant to support its core curriculum framework.

In addition, the state has appropriated $542,000 to support AP professional development services in the 2006-2007 school year, and has released an RFP for universities in the state to provide summer institutes in June 2007.
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. State policy authorizes districts and charter schools to create core curriculum frameworks in grades K-6 to prepare students for pre-AP and AP offerings in grades 7-12. The framework must include:
(1) a curriculum that is aligned with state academic content and performance standards that is challenging, specific as to content and sequential from grade to grade, similar to a core curriculum sequence;
(2) in-depth professional development for teachers that includes vertical teaming in content areas; and
(3) content, materials and instructional strategies or methodologies that current research demonstrates are likely to lead to improved student achievement” in pre-AP and AP courses in grades 7-12. A district or charter school may apply for a grant from the public education department to support a core curriculum framework.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Accountability incentives: N.M. ADMIN. CODE tit. 1, § 18.924.311
Financial incentives: N.M. STAT. ANN. § 22-13-1.5
Teacher training: N.M. STAT. ANN. § 22-13-1.5; Department Web site; Department Request for Application for Advanced Placement Summer Institutes 2007
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: N.M. STAT. ANN. § 22-13-1.5

New York
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' AP testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site

North Carolina
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' AP testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The North Carolina Virtual Public School offers AP courses.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: North Carolina Virtual Public School Web site

North Dakota
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' AP testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The North Dakota Center for Distance Education offers AP Biology, English Language and Composition, English Literature and Composition, Calculus AB, Human Geography and AP U.S. History. As of August 2006, costs vary by course. AP Calculus AB, English Literature and Composition, and Human Geography are offered for free, while AP Biology and English Language and Composition are each $243 for the first semester (less expensive the second semester).
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: North Dakota Center for Distance Education Web site
Credit for minimum scores: North Dakota University System procedure 403.7.4 Common Credit-By-Exam Guidelines and credit-by-exam chart

Ohio
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No. However, all districts are required to offer at least one "dual enrollment" program, which may include Advanced Placement courses, the postsecondary enrollment options program, or "any similar program established pursuant to an agreement between" a district and an institution of higher education.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. Each local report card (which does not affect school or district ratings) indicates the percentage of students in the previous year who participated in AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state will cover low-income students' testing fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated OHIO. REV. CODE ANN. § 3313.6013 (2006 S.B. 311)
Accountability incentives: Guide for Ohio's Report Card System 2006-2007
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Credit for minimum scores: OHIO. REV. CODE ANN. § 3313.6013 (2006 S.B. 311)

Oklahoma
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. Through the Oklahoma Advanced Placement Incentive Program, the state board may award schools $100 for each score of 3 or higher on an AP test. These funds must be used to develop the school's AP program. The state program also provides one-time equipment and materials grants of up to $5,000 for each AP course. A school receiving a grant must offer the AP course beginning the school year after receiving the grant.

In addition, districts that participate in the consolidation and annexation incentives program have, for the first three years "after consolidation or annexation preference for allocations from funds" for AP incentives, among others.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. One of the indicators in the state's Academic Performance Index (API) is "Advanced Placement credit awarded at one of three levels based on student AP examination scores." Academic Excellence is one of the three major components of the index; within Academic Excellence, AP receives a 30% weight, the second-highest weight after ACT data.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Schools may be awarded a one-time "equipment and/or instructional materials grant" of up to $5,000 to provide an AP course. A school receiving a grant must "provide the College Board training within one year of the grant award, including at least a one-week summer institute." Teachers must additionally be encouraged to attend annual follow-up training.

Statute defines an AP "vertical team" as "a group of middle school or junior high school and high school educators in a given discipline who work cooperatively to develop and implement a vertically aligned program aimed at helping students acquire the academic skills necessary for success in the advanced placement program...." The state board is authorized to provide schools with subsidized training for pre-AP courses, and grants for schools to develop AP vertical teams.

The state board is also authorized to award schools subsidized training for AP courses.
State subsidies for testing fees Students who take more than one AP exam in a school year will have a portion of their exam fee paid by the state department of education. The state board is likewise authorized to cover a share of the AP test fee for students who demonstrate financial need.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state board is authorized to award funds for schools to develop AP vertical teams. Statute defines a vertical team as "a group of middle school or junior high school and high school educators in a given discipline who work cooperatively to develop and implement a vertically aligned program aimed at helping students acquire the academic skills necessary for success in the advanced placement program[.]" A vertical team must "include at least one representative from each grade level in the content area" grades 7-12.

The state board is also authorized to award schools funds to subsidize training for pre-AP teachers.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Schools that receive a one-time grant and demonstrate successful implementation of the courses for which the first grants were awarded may qualify for additional grants a minimum of four years after receiving an initial grant award. (OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.702)
Financial incentives: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.703, 7-204; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE 210:40-52-5
Accountability incentives: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 3-150; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:10-13-20
Teacher training: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.702, 1210.703; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:40-52-5
Testing fees: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.703; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:40-52-6.2, 210:40-52-5
Encouraging access: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.702, 1210.703; OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:40-52-5

Oregon
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No, although all districts must offer the Expanded Options Program, which provides opportunities for 11th- and 12th-graders to earn postsecondary credit through dual credit technical preparation programs, such as two-plus-two programs, AP and International Baccalaureate.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No, although each district must report to the state department of education the types of accelerated college credit programs offered, including AP.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. AP is a component of the state's Expanded Options Program, which provides opportunities for students in grades 11 and 12 to earn postsecondary credit through dual credit technical preparation programs, such as two-plus-two programs, advanced placement and International Baccalaureate.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state's Expanded Options Program provides opportunities for students in grades 11 and 12 to earn postsecondary credit through dual credit technical preparation programs, such as two-plus-two programs, advanced placement and International Baccalaureate. All districts must offer the program, but districts are not required to offer all three components of program (AP, IB and dual enrollment). Districts are required to have processes to ensure that all at-risk students (defined as those eligible for free and reduced lunch) and their parents are notified about the Expanded Options Program. In addition, "It shall be a priority for school districts to provide information about the Expanded Options Program to high school students who have dropped out of school." Districts are mandated to "establish a process to identify high school students who have dropped out of school and provide those students with information about the program." The Department must annually report on the program to the House and Senate education committees and Joint Boards of Education. The report must include "[t]he number of students who had dropped out of high school but returned to high school to participate in the Expanded Options Program and earned a diploma." The report must also indicate "[t]he number of students who participated in the Expanded Options Program, categorized by ethnicity and financial status" and participation rates among rural students.

The Oregon Virtual School District (OVSD) provides AP courses.

In addition, 2007. H.B. 2263 directs the state department of education to contract to offer an assessment to all 10th graders. The assessment must have the capacity to identify students with "high potential to excel" in AP courses "based on a research-based correlation of scores on the grade 10 assessment" to AP exams.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: OR. REV. STAT. § 340.005 through 340.090; OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1362 through 581-022-1370
Accountability incentives: OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1363
Teacher training: Department document
Testing fees: Oregon Advanced Placement Test Fee Program Eligibility Criteria
Collaboration: OR. REV. STAT. § 340.005 through 340.090; OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1362 through 581-022-1370
Encouraging access: OR. REV. STAT. § 340.005 through 340.090; OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1362 through 581-022-1370; Oregon Department of Education Web site; Department bulletin; 2007 H.B. 2263 
Credit for minimum scores: Chapter 636, Oregon Laws 2005; Robert Mercer, Oregon University System

Pennsylvania
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers AP testing fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site

Puerto Rico
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No information located
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No information located
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No information located
State programs and funding for teacher training No information located
State subsidies for testing fees No information located
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No information located
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No information located
State support for encouraging access to AP No information located
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No information located

Rhode Island
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No information available
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

South Carolina
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings Yes, although contingent on school size. "Each school district shall provide advanced placement courses in all secondary schools of the district which enroll an adequate number of academically talented students to support the course." The state board is mandated to determine what constitutes an adequate number of students for an AP course. However, state board policy indicates, "All secondary schools whose organizational structure includes grade 11 or 12 shall offer an Advanced Placement course(s)."
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The South Carolina Department of Education funds and coordinates AP teacher training courses. An AP teacher must "have completed the appropriate Advanced Placement three graduate hour training program verified by the appropriate college or university." However, newly assigned AP teachers have one calendar year to complete their training. Waivers on the training requirement are available to teachers who hold a Ph.D. in their subject area or "who have served with Educational Testing Service as readers for the AP exams[.]"
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state will pay $52 per exam for low-income students and $74 per exam for students who are not low-income.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit Yes. "All students enrolled in Advanced Placement programs for which funding is provided under these regulations shall be required to take the College Board administered examination."
Sources Offering mandated: S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-29-190; 43 S.C. ANN. REGS. 225, 234 and 258.1
Teacher training: 43 S.C. ANN. REGS. 258.1
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Credit for minimum scores: S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-29-190
Course credit: 43 S.C. ANN. REGS. 258.1

South Dakota
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The department of education provides funds for public school AP teachers to attend summer institutes.
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers AP testing fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The South Dakota Virtual High School offers AP courses.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Department Web site
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: South Dakota Virtual High School Web site
Credit for minimum scores: South Dakota Board of Regents Policy Manual Policy 2:5

Tennessee
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No. However, if a district offers AP courses, it must annually approve a list of AP courses and must "ensure that approved courses substantially incorporate the learning objectives and course descriptions as defined by the College Board[.]"
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers AP test fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: TENN. COMP. R. & REGS. 0520-1-3-.05
Testing fees: College Board Web site

Texas
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No, although all districts are required to offer students the opportunity to earn the equivalent of at least 12 semester credits in high school. IB is one of the means by which this college credit may be earned.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. Schools may receive a one-time $3,000 equipment grant for providing an AP course. Funds are awarded to a school based on need as determined by the commissioner. However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, the $3,000 equipment grant was last funded in the 2002-2003 biennium.

A school may also be awarded up to $100 for each student who scores a 3 or higher on an AP exam. Equipment grants and score reward funds must be used in the manner determined by the campus team convened by the principal. However, the school must "give priority to academic enhancement purposes in using an award received under the program," and may not use the award "for any purpose related to athletics."

The state also targets financial incentives for AP teachers. A teacher may receive a one-time $250 award for teaching an AP class for the first time. In addition, the state may deposit $50 in the teacher bonus pool for each student enrolled in the school that scores a three or better on an AP exam. An AP teacher may receive "a share of the teacher bonus pool, which [must] be distributed by the teacher's school in shares proportional to the number of [AP] courses taught." However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, neither the $250 award nor the teacher bonus pool share has ever been funded by the state.

A district "is entitled to state revenue necessary to provide the district with the sum of ... an amount equal to the product of $275 multiplied by the number of students in average daily attendance in grades nine through 12 in the district." One of the ways districts may use these funds is to "implement or administer a program that encourages students to pursue advanced academic opportunities, including early college high school programs and dual credit, advanced placement, and international baccalaureate courses...." The state additionally provides districts with an annual allotment for each student identified as gifted and talented. Such funds may be used to provide AP programs.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. In addition to the state's standard accountability system, the state awards schools a "gold performance rating program based on enhanced performance." For high schools, "[t]he performance standards on which a gold performance rating is based should include ... the percentage of students who take advanced placement tests and student performance on those tests...."
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. An AP or pre-AP teacher may receive a subsidy of up to $450 for teacher training endorsed or sponsored by the College Board.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students demonstrating financial need may receive a testing fee subsidy of up to $25 (all students must receive same amount, subject to state board approval).

In addition, statute authorizes a student who earns a 3 or higher on an AP exam to receive up to $65 reimbursement for the testing fee. The commissioner of education is authorized to enter into agreements with the College Board "to pay for all examinations taken by eligible public school students." The state defines an "eligible student" as one taking an AP course at a public school or "who is recommended by the student's principal or teacher to take the test." However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, the $65 test fee reimbursement has never been funded by the state.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. "A school district may apply to the agency for the establishment of a technology immersion pilot project for the entire district or for a particular school or group of schools in the district." One of the criteria the Texas Education Agency must use in selecting districts and schools for the pilot is whether the district or school has limited access to AP courses, and if the problem "can be mitigated through the use of wireless mobile computing devices and other technologies...."

The Texas Virtual School offers AP courses.

The Texas Middle School Program for AP Spanish allows native Spanish speakers to take AP Spanish while still in middle school. This program also appears to offer pre-AP opportunities.

A pre-AP teacher may receive a subsidy of up to $450 for teacher training endorsed or sponsored by the College Board.

The Lighthouse Initiative for Texas Classrooms provides online tools to help teachers connect the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) and Pre-AP and AP curricular objectives, to prepare students for AP-level coursework at the high school level.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources

Offering mandated: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.009 (as amended by 2007 H.B. 3485)
Financial incentives: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.053, 28.055, 39.114, 42.156; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 74.29; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
Accountability incentives: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 39.0721
Teacher training: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.053, 28.056; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 74.29; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
Testing fees: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.053, 28.054; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 74.29; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007
Encouraging access: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 32.154; Texas Virtual School Web site; "Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas 2005-06," Texas Education Agency, June 2007; Texas Middle School Program for AP Spanish Web site; Lighthouse Initiative Web site
Credit for minimum scores: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 51.968


Utah
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. The state makes available AP funds "to offset the costs of funding smaller classes; to fund workshops within the district to work on beginning, implementing, or coordinating an Advanced Placement Program;" to purchase needed supplemental texts, materials and equipment for a library, laboratory or classroom; and "to assist with costs of distance learning programs, equipment or instructors which could increase the AP options in a school." "Funds are distributed on the basis of the following: the total funds designated for the Advanced Placement Program are divided by the total number of Advanced Placement exams passed with a grade of 3 or higher by students in the public schools of Utah. This results in a fixed amount of dollars per exam passed. Each participating school district receives that amount for each exam successfully passed by one of its students."

Funds allocated for accelerated learning programs through Section 53A-17a-104 must be allocated to districts for any of three programs: AP, concurrent enrollment and programs for gifted and talented students in grades 1-12. The state board is mandated to "develop uniform and consistent policies for school districts to follow in utilizing advanced placement and concurrent enrollment monies."
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. School performance reports indicate the number of students taking AP courses; the number and percent of students taking a specific AP course who take the AP exam to receive college credit for the course; and the number and percent of students who pass the AP test.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Districts may use state AP funds for staff development, including "stipends for tuition and living expenses connected with the pursuit of additional training on specified Advanced Placement curriculum taught by the teacher[.]" Districts may also allocate state AP funds "to pay a teacher directly involved in a small group or individual tutorial as an extra assignment in a small school or with a limited number of students who are able and willing to take an Advanced Placement course[.] ... Funds are distributed on the basis of the following: the total funds designated for the Advanced Placement Program are divided by the total number of Advanced Placement exams passed with a grade of 3 or higher by students in the public schools of Utah. This results in a fixed amount of dollars per exam passed. Each participating school district receives that amount for each exam successfully passed by one of its students."
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. "Funds are distributed on the basis of the following: the total funds designated for the Advanced Placement Program are divided by the total number of Advanced Placement exams passed with a grade of 3 or higher by students in the public schools of Utah. This results in a fixed amount of dollars per exam passed. Each participating school district receives that amount for each exam successfully passed by one of its students."

State also covers low-income students' AP exam fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The state board is directed to work with the board of regents to implement an AP program. "The delivery system and curriculum program [must] be designed and implemented to take full advantage of the most current available educational technology." The board of regents is required to ensure "college credit courses are taught in high school concurrent enrollment or advanced placement programs by college or university faculty or public school educators under the following conditions: (i) public school educators in concurrent enrollment programs must first be approved as adjunct faculty and supervised by a state institution of higher education; (ii) teaching is done through live classroom instruction or telecommunications; and ... (c) college credits obtained [through AP must] be accepted for transfer of credit purposes as if they had been obtained at any public institution of higher education within the state system."
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Districts may use state AP funds "to assist with costs of distance learning programs, equipment or instructors which could increase the AP options in a school. Funds are distributed on the basis of the following: the total funds designated for the Advanced Placement Program are divided by the total number of Advanced Placement exams passed with a grade of 3 or higher by students in the public schools of Utah. This results in a fixed amount of dollars per exam passed. Each participating school district receives that amount for each exam successfully passed by one of its students."
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: UTAH CODE ANN. § 53A-17a-120; UTAH. ADMIN. CODE R277-712-3
Accountability incentives: UTAH CODE ANN. § 53A-3-602.5
Teacher training: UTAH. ADMIN. CODE R277-712-3
Testing fees: UTAH. ADMIN. CODE R277-712-3; Department Web site
Collaboration: UTAH CODE ANN. § 53A-15-101
Encouraging access: UTAH. ADMIN. CODE R277-712-3
Credit for minimum scores: UTAH CODE ANN. § 53B-16-105; Utah State Board of Regents Rule R470-9.1.2.1

Vermont
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No. State does not require AP in all high schools but does require high schools to offer students the opportunity to take advanced course work such as college level courses and AP.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state covers low-income students' AP exam fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: VT. CODE R. 22-000-003
Testing fees: College Board Web site

Virgin Islands
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No information located
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No information located
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No information located
State programs and funding for teacher training No information located
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. According to the College Board Web site, the territory will cover AP test fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No information located
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No information located
State support for encouraging access to AP No information located
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No information located
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site

Virginia
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No, although all schools must provide either three AP courses, dual enrollment courses, International Baccalaureate courses, Cambridge courses, or any combination thereof.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. High schools' School Performance Report Cards must include the percentage of students taking AP courses and AP exams.
State programs and funding for teacher training National Governors Association (NGA) Honor State funds are being used to offer up to three $1,000 scholarships in each honor school to teachers of AP or dual enrollment courses. Scholarship funds can help cover "tuition, room, board, and travel expenses to attend AP training institutes in teacher subject areas .... Up to two scholarships may be used in 2005-2006, with remainder used in 2006-2007."
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. In addition, local boards must implement a plan to notify students and their parents (of public school as well as home schooled students) "the availability of financial assistance to low-income and needy students to take" AP exams.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Virginia Department of Education's Virtual Advanced Placement School offers a variety of AP courses. Foreign language courses are open to students from the seventh grade and higher. Courses are free to students participating in the Early College Scholars program. Students not enrolled in the Early College Scholars program pay $375 times the Local Composite Index, while private and home school students can participate by paying $375 per student. Out-of-state students can also take courses for a $450 per-student fee.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Offering mandated: 8 VA. ADMIN. CODE § 20-131-100
Accountability incentives: VA. CODE ANN. § 22.1-253.13:3; 8 VA. ADMIN. CODE § 20-131-270
Teacher training: Department Web site
Testing fees: VA. CODE ANN. § 22.1-253.13:1, 22.1-254.1

Washington
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training The state uses federal funds from two Advanced Placement Incentive Program grants to provide subgrants to selected schools and districts to train teachers. All participating schools/districts have at least 40% of their students on free/reduced lunch. Funds are also targeted to schools designated 97-100% rural by the 2000 U.S. census.
State subsidies for testing fees State covers all but $5 of AP testing fees for low-income students.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP A federal Advanced Placement Incentive Program 2005-2008 grant is supporting AP expansion in rural schools in the state.

In addition, Insight School of Washington offers a variety of AP courses. Washington State residents may take courses tuition-free.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Teacher training: Barbara Dittrich, Advanced Placement Program Supervisor, Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
Testing fees: Department Web site
Encouraging access: Department Web site; Insight School Web site

West Virginia
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No, although all districts must offer AP courses. Effective with the 2008-2009 school year, all high schools must offer a minimum of four AP courses or the International Baccalaureate program.
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. School report card data are "reported for comparison at the school level with county, state, regional, and national data." Three of the indicators included on such report cards are (1) the percentage of students in grades 10-12 who took an (1) AP course; (2) the percentage of students in grades 10-12 who took an AP exam; and (3) the percentage of 12th graders who scored a 3 or higher on an AP exam.

The state likewise uses "indicators of exemplary student, school and school system performance and progress ... for determining whether accredited and approved schools and school systems should be granted exemplary status." One of these indicators for high schools is that 5% or more of a school's students successfully complete AP, dual credit and honors courses.

2007 S.B. 657 likewise authorizes the state board, for purposes of accreditation, to award schools and/or districts bonus points or credits for advanced placement percentages.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state board is mandated to "establish a program coordinated through the colleges and universities or some other entity" to provide training to AP teachers. Local boards must, "if necessary," make arrangements for teachers to attend a training program.

In addition, legislation creates the West Virginia Advanced Placement Center, which is to (1) coordinate AP teacher training institutes; (2) establish "a cadre of instructors" for the AP teacher training institutes; (3) offer "follow-up teacher training" for AP teachers; (4) identify and obtain "external sources of funding;" and (5) network AP teachers through an AP newsletter, among other responsibilities.
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the state will pay low-income students' exam fees.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The West Virginia Advanced Placement Center is directed to assist and serve as a liaison for the College Board and the West Virginia Department of Education, county boards of education, institutions of higher education, the West Virginia advanced placement advisory council, the legislature and the governor.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. State notes that the "[h]onors and advanced placement curriculum may include advanced placement courses offered through the college board or other public or private foundations, corporations, institutions, or businesses whose courses are generally accepted as leading to advanced placement or standing in a postsecondary institution, accelerated instructional courses offered via satellite and other courses and arrangements, approved by the state board, which provide students an opportunity to advance their learning above that offered through the regular curriculum."

The West Virginia Virtual School includes AP courses among its offerings. According to the school's Web site, "Local school districts may pay tuition through instructional budgets. Parents may be requested to pay tuition if the course is offered at the school, and there is no justifiable need to duplicate the course offering. Local and federal funding may also be used." Charges vary according to the course provider, and range from $400-$750 per student per semester.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. It is "strongly recommended" but not mandated that students in AP courses take the corresponding AP exam.
Sources Offering mandated: W. VA. CODE § 18-2E-3a; W. VA. CODE ST. R. 126-42-5.6.1 (Chart VI)
Accountability incentives: W. VA. CODE § 18-2E-5; W. VA. CODE ST. R. § 126-13-10, 126-191-2
Teacher training: W. VA. CODE § 18-2E-3a, 18A-3A-5
Testing fees: College Board Web site
Collaboration: W. VA. CODE § 18A-3A-5
Encouraging access: W. VA. CODE § 18-2E-3a; W. VA. CODE ST. R. § 126-42-5; West Virginia Virtual School Web site
Credit for minimum scores: W. VA. CODE ST. R. § 133-15-1 through -5, 135-15-1 through -5
Course credit: W. VA. CODE ST. R. § 126-44L-4

Wisconsin
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses Yes. The state's Advanced Coursework Expansion Reimbursement offers funds to partially reimburse districts for the costs of offering IB and Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high schools that added new IB or AP courses during the previous school year. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction received funds for the program in 2006-2007 and included $100,000 for the program in its 2007-2009 biennial budget proposal, which is pending legislative approval as of August 2007.
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses Yes. School and district accountability reports must indicate the percentage of students participating in AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training State is using NGA Honor State monies to provide ongoing training for AP teachers and coordinators, administrators and counselors in select schools.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes, in some districts. Local boards of common or union high school districts must cover the costs of AP exams taken by students eligible for free and reduced lunch.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state's Advanced Coursework Expansion Reimbursement offers funds to partially reimburse districts for the costs of offering IB and Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high schools that added new IB or AP courses during the previous school year. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction received funds for the program in 2006-2007 and included $100,000 for the program in its 2007-2009 biennial budget proposal, which is pending legislative approval as of August 2007.

The Wisconsin Advanced Placement Distance Learning Consortium is administered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center on Education and Work and collaborators such as the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, offering a variety of AP courses. As of August 2006, the price of courses vary. The maximum course cost is $250 per student per semester, paid by the student's school district to the AP teacher's school district.

In addition, the Wisconsin Virtual School (WVS) offers AP courses for $325 per semester per student; cost may be paid by district or parent. According to the WVS Web site, the program offers 95% of all AP subjects available in Wisconsin. WVS likewise offers a free AP exam review to students enrolled in a WVS AP online course. Students not enrolled in a WVS AP course may participate in the AP exam review for $20 per review.

According to the consortium Web site, almost one-fourth of the state's high schools do not offer a single AP course, making these distance learning efforts key in expanding AP access in the state.

The state is also making funds available in FY 2007 to schools "that did not offer on-site, on-line, or distance learning advanced placement courses during the 2005-06 school year OR those that increased the number of advanced placement opportunities offered on-site, on-line, or via distance learning during the 2006-07 academic year."

Funds received from the National Governors Association (NGA) are being used to increase AP offerings and quality in targeted low-income/high minority/rural schools. The NGA strategy includes expanding AP courses; AP professional development for teachers, administrators and counselors; preparing students in the middle grades for AP rigor, and using the PSAT to measure AP potential.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Financial incentives: WIS. STAT. § 20.255, 115.28(45); Application Package for Advanced Placement Expansion 2006-2007; Chrys Mursky, Gifted and Talented and Advanced Placement Consultant, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
Accountability incentives: WIS. STAT. § 115.38
Teacher training: Department Web site; National Governors Association Web site
Testing fees: WIS. STAT. § 120.12
Encouraging access: 115.28(45); Application Package for Advanced Placement Expansion 2006-2007; Chrys Mursky, Gifted and Talented and Advanced Placement Consultant, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; Wisconsin Advanced Placement Distance Learning Consortium Web site; Wisconsin Virtual School Web site; Department Web site; National Governors Association Web site

Wyoming
Advanced Placement
State mandates AP course offerings No
State provides financial incentives for AP courses No
State provides accountability incentives for AP courses No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees According to the College Board Web site, the test fee is $52 for low-income students, although if funding is available, the state may cover some or all exam costs on a first-come, first-served basis until funds are depleted.
State provides scholarship incentives for achieving certain scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Wyoming Equality Video Network (WEN Video), sponsored through the Wyoming Department of Education, offers AP coursework.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Sources Testing fees: College Board Web site
Encouraging access: Wyoming Department of Education Web site



© 2013 by the Education Commission of the States (ECS). All rights reserved. ECS is the only nationwide, nonpartisan interstate compact devoted to education.

To request permission to excerpt part of this publication, either in print or electronically, please fax a request to the attention of the ECS Communications Department, 303.296.8332 or e-mail ecs@ecs.org.

Helping State Leaders Shape Education Policy