Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org
Dual Enrollment
Dual enrollment programs — a.k.a. dual credit, concurrent enrollment, postsecondary enrollment options, etc. — allow high school students the opportunity to earn secondary and/or postsecondary credit  before graduating from high school, sometimes at no cost to the student or student's family.

This database provides information on the following policy components:

1. Statewide policy in place: Forty-six states have statewide policies governing at least one statewide dual enrollment program. In four states, dual enrollment programs are administered by local district and institution-level policies.

2. Definition or title of program.

3. Offering mandatory or voluntary: Twelve states require all high schools and eligible public postsecondary institutions to provide dual enrollment opportunities. In 21 states, dual enrollment programs are based on voluntary partnerships between K-12 and postsecondary partners, or schools, districts or institutions may limit eligible students from participating. In nine states, policy does not specify whether the offering of dual enrollment is mandatory or voluntary.

4. Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition:
  • Students/parents: Twenty-two states
  • Student's school district: Six states
  • Participating postsecondary institution: Three states
  • The state department of education or another state organization: Three states
  • Four states (Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana and Missouri) have multiple dual enrollment programs which have different groups that are primarily responsible for tuition.
  • In six states there is no clear funding system in place.

  • In some of the states where the student or parent is primarily responsible for tuition, state rules or laws stipulate that a district or higher education institution may fund the tuition costs. The fact that the language in these states says "may" as opposed to "will" means that the primary responsibility of paying tuition is still with the parents or the student, and only the secondary responsibility lies with the district/higher education institution.

    5. College partners can be two-year/four-year/both: Five states allow only two-year public postsecondary institutions to participate in dual enrollment programs. Thirty-nine states allow two- and four-year postsecondary institutions to accept dual enrollment students. In five states, state policy does not address the types of institutions that may accept dual enrollment students. Twenty-three states allow nonpublic, proprietary or tribal colleges to participate in dual enrollment programs.

    6. Where courses provided: Two states specify that dual enrollment courses may be offered only on postsecondary campuses. Thirty states explicitly authorize dual enrollment courses to be taught in high schools or on postsecondary campuses. In policy or practice, at least 17 states provide dual enrollment courses online. Ten states allow dual enrollment courses to be offered at "other" physical locations than the high school or postsecondary campus. Policies in 18 states do not specify where dual enrollment courses may be offered.

    7. Student eligibility requirements:
  • Grade level: Two states require students who meet all other eligibility criteria to be in at least grade 10; 20 states require students to be in at least grade 11. Nine states appear to allow students in any grades 9-12 to participate, provided students meet all other eligibility criteria. In seven states, the eligible student's grade level varies, depending on which of two or more state-level programs a student is participating in. At least three states have an additional dual enrollment program especially designed for students in grade 12.
  • Grade point average: Seven states include minimum high school grade point average (GPA) as a criterion to be admitted to a dual enrollment program. Three more states require a GPA for program admission only under certain circumstances.
  • Written approval/recommendation: In 22 states, written permission or a recommendation from a teacher, principal, other school or district staff member or postsecondary official is an eligibility criterion. In three additional states, written approval is necessary only for certain programs or under certain circumstances.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution: Twenty-five states require dual enrollment candidates to demonstrate college readiness by earning minimum scores on ACT, SAT, PSAT or college placement exams, and meeting course prerequisites set by departments or institutions.
  • "Other":  Seventeen states require all dual enrollment candidates to meet "other" eligibility criteria, including parental permission, completion of certain high school courses or passing scores on state assessments. Five additional states require "other" criteria only for certain programs or under certain circumstances.

  • 8. Cap on number of credits students may earn: Four states cap the number of dual enrollment credits high school students may earn. However, caps vary considerably, from two courses a semester to 30 semester hours per academic year. Ten states explicitly allow high school students to enroll in college programs as part- or full-time students. Two states specify that postsecondary institutions may determine limits on the number of dual enrollment credits students may earn. In four states, state policy places a cap on the number of postsecondary credits students may earn in one program but sets no cap in the other state program. One state sets a cap on the combined high school and postsecondary credits a student may take in any given semester. State policy does not address this issue in 29 states.

    9. Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned: Twenty-six states specify that dual enrollment students earn both high school and postsecondary credit. One state requires only high school credit to be awarded. Four states require only postsecondary credit to be awarded. In six states, the type of credit awarded (high school, postsecondary, or dual credit) varies depending on the state program in which a student is enrolled. Thirteen states do not specify in state policy whether secondary or postsecondary credit is awarded upon completion of a dual enrollment course.

    10. How state funds participating high schools: Thirty-one states provide schools/districts with the same level of funding for dual enrollment students and traditional high school students. Eight states provide equal funding for dual enrollment and traditional high school students, but with qualifications. Four states provide reduced funding for dual enrollment students as compared to traditional high school students. One state provides different levels of funding, depending on which program a student is participating in. Six states do not specify the funding levels for dual enrollment students in statute or regulations.

    11. How state funds participating postsecondary institutions: Thirty-eight states provide postsecondary institutions with the same level of funding for dual enrollment students and traditional postsecondary students. Two states provide equal funding for dual enrollment and traditional postsecondary students, but with qualifications. One state funds dual enrollment students at a higher level than traditional postsecondary students. One state provides different levels of funding, depending on which program a student is participating in. Eight states do not specify the postsecondary funding levels for dual enrollment students in statute or regulations.

    12. Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities: Twenty states require students and/or parents to be notified of the availability of dual enrollment programs.

    13. Instructor and course quality component: Twenty-nine states have embedded instructor/course quality components into state policy. Such policies may require high school instructors teaching dual enrollment courses to meet additional criteria, such as supplemental training or appointment as adjunct faculty at the partner postsecondary institution, or require course syllabi or other materials to undergo review by postsecondary faculty, or put other measures in place to ensure the content of dual enrollment courses is equivalent to that of courses taught to traditional postsecondary students. State policy in a few states addresses instructor quality for postsecondary faculty.

    14. Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits: Fifteen states require all public two- and four-year institutions to accept transfer credits earned through dual enrollment programs. Fifteen states do not require all public postsecondary institutions to accept dual enrollment courses for transfer credit. In two states, public postsecondary institutions must recognize credit earned through one state program, but are not required to recognize credit earned through another state program. Policies in 18 states are unclear on this issue.

    15. Institutional reporting requirement: Eighteen states require postsecondary institutions to report on dual enrollment participation. Thirty-one states do not have any such reporting requirements in state policy. One state has separate reporting requirements for two- and four-year public institutions, but does not require institutions outside the public systems to report on dual enrollment participation.

    16. Program evaluation component: Thirteen states require dual enrollment programs to be evaluated. Thirty-five states do not have state-level policies requiring dual enrollment programs to undergo evaluation. In two states, a state or local entity has the authority to perform an auditing or evaluation function, but it is not clear that all programs under the entity's authority must be evaluated.

    17. Unique characteristics.

    Note: This database does not include information about Tech Prep or early/middle college high school programs. Information about such programs is included in the ECS career/technical education and early/middle college high school databases.

    Methodology: This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites, and will be updated as new policies and programs are enacted.

    Last updated: December 4, 2008

    Most data compiled by Jennifer Dounay, project manager, ECS High School Policy Center. For questions, additions or corrections: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org. Tuition, K-12 funding and postsecondary funding data compiled by Michael Griffith, policy analyst. For questions, additions or corrections: 303.299.3619 or mgriffith@ecs.org.
    Alabama
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment – Postsecondary Institutions. High school students are allowed to take college courses for credit either at a high school or on a college campus.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent, unless otherwise negotiated between the college and the local board of education.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. A high school teacher teaching a dual enrollment course must be designated an adjunct faculty member of the college and must meet the state board and other accrediting agencies' credentialing requirements. Faculty must be under the college's control and supervision, and the college must provide for faculty orientation, supervision and evaluation.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Yes. Each college/local board partnership must include a plan for annual program evaluation.
    Unique characteristics Private school and homeschool students may also establish dual enrollment agreements with postsecondary institutions.

    Students in grades 10-12 who do not meet the eligibility requirement of a "B" average in high school courses may be determined eligible to participate in dual enrollment "pending demonstrated ability to benefit as documented by successful completion and placement identification on assessments approved by the department of postsecondary education" (includes ASSET, WorkKeys, CPAT). Such students are limited to pursuing career/technical and health-related courses, and must have "a 'B' average in high school courses related to the occupational/technical studies, if applicable, which the student intends to pursue at the postsecondary level and" have an overall 2.5 grade point average.
    Sources ALA. ADMIN. CODE r. 290-3-1-.02(10); Alabama College System policy 801.03, effective August 28, 2008; Pamel Arrington, Alabama Commission on Higher Education

    Alaska
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • No
  • Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in Alaska, dual enrollment is offered on an institutional basis.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • No state policy
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • How state funds participating high schools Reduced funding for dual enrollment students
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources ALASKA ADMIN. CODE tit. 4, § 05.035

    Arizona
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Dual Enrollment and Concurrent Enrollment. Dual Enrollment courses are offered either on a high school or postsecondary campus through an "intergovernmental agreement" between a local board and a community college district governing board. Concurrent Enrollment courses are offered on a college campus. Policies in this profile generally relate to dual enrollment provisions.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Unless the student's high school or community college has volunteered to pay the tuition, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: Only applies for courses offered at high schools. A community college may waive the grade level requirement for up to 25% of students, provided that students in grades 9-10 demonstrate via exam and course requirements, that they are prepared to benefit from the course.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Student completion of course prerequisites, and either score on college placement test that indicates the student is at the appropriate level for the course, or composite score of at least: 93 on PSAT, 930 on SAT, or 22 on ACT (student may substitute this score for AIMS exam scores listed under "other")
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Students below age 18 must achieve passing score on relevant portions of Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS) Test (or adequate college placement test score listed under "entrance requirements" above). Students age 18 and older who do not have a high school diploma and who wish to enroll in a course offered on the community college campus need only demonstrate "evidence of potential success in the community college."
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, institutions may choose to limit the number of semester hours in which a student may enroll to not more than six credit hours.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Each community college district and the Arizona Board of Regents must provide all high schools with information which describes the policies and rules, types of courses available and other information related to the enrollment of students under the age of eighteen." Districts must make this information available to all high school students.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Courses offered at a high school must be previously evaluated and approved by the community college district, and must be at a higher level than taught by the high school. The textbooks, syllabi, course outlines and grading standards must be the same as those used at the community college.

    Each community college offering courses in high schools must form an advisory committee of full-time faculty to meet at least three times each school year. The committee must assist in course selection and implementation at the high schools, and review and report at least annually whether the course guidelines are followed, and whether the same standards of expectations and assessments are applied as though the course were offered on the community college.

    Each community college district offering courses in high schools must likewise establish an advisory committee of full-time faculty to assist in the selection, orientation, ongoing professional development and evaluation of faculty teaching college courses in high schools. This advisory committee must meet at least twice each school year.

    Lastly, every agreement between a school district and community college district to offer courses in high schools must specify the quality of instruction that will be provided under the agreement. Every community college district providing such instruction must annually report to the joint legislative budget committee on teacher training and observation costs.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Every community college district and the Arizona board of regents must annually report to the president of the senate, speaker of the house and state board the number of dually enrolled students, "[a] general narrative of the types of courses or programs in which the students were enrolled" and the community college district board's dual enrollment policies.

    Every community college district must also annually report to the joint legislative budget committee:
  • Compliance with provisions related to evaluation and approval of courses, textbooks, syllabi, course outlines, grading standards and faculty
  • The number of participating students who were in grades 9-10
  • Total enrollments by location, by high school grade level, by course, and by whether the program was academic or occupational
  • Summary data on student performance in courses offered at high schools, including completion rates and grade distribution
  • Course level data on student performance in courses offered at high schools, including completion rates, grade distribution, and the number of students who received remedial instruction for the course.
  • A copy of each addendum of an agreement to offer community college courses at the high school
  • Summary data by community college district and by community college on the number of scholarships or grants awarded.
  • Itemized actual program costs for curriculum development and approval; textbook costs; facility and equipment costs; counseling and tutoring costs; teacher training and observation costs
  • Course level data indicating the entity that provided faculty, entity that provided faculty pay and the amount paid to each faculty member.


  • In addition, every community college district that offers dual enrollment courses in high schools must annually report a specified percentage of its initial dual enrollment agreements or contracts, which must specify financial provisions of the agreement and the format for billing of services, tuition and financial aid policies, accountability provisions for each party, responsibilities and services required of each party, the type of instruction provided under the agreement, including course titles and the quality of instruction to be provided under the agreement.
    Program evaluation component Yes. Each community college district offering courses in high schools must conduct tracking studies of participating students' subsequent academic or occupational achievement, to be submitted to the joint legislative budget committee every other year. Tracking studies may use statistically valid sampling techniques and must include
  • High school graduation rate
  • Number of students continuing their studies at an Arizona community college or four-year public institution
  • Student performance in subsequent college courses in the same discipline or occupational field
  • Each student's grade point average after one year at a state postsecondary institution as compared to the student's college grade point average for courses completed while still in high school.

    Upon receipt of the report, the joint legislative budget committee may convene an ad hoc committee of community college academic officers, faculty and other experts to review the manner in which these courses are provided. This committee may make recommendations to the joint legislative budget committee on changes to methods of providing community college courses in high schools.
  • Unique characteristics The community college district governing board and the local school board must enter into an agreement that addresses each party's responsibility "for payment for facilities, personnel and other costs, and the manner in which the college tuition is to be paid by or on behalf of each student...."

    Dual enrollment courses must "be at a higher level than taught by the high school[.]"

    Home schooled students are exempt from student eligibility criteria related to scores on ACT, SAT, PSAT, AIMS or college placement tests.
    Sources ARIZ. REV. STAT. § 15-101(10), 15-1805.01, 15-1821, 15-1821.01, 15-701.01, 15-1445(15)

    Arkansas
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Dual Enrollment and Concurrent Enrollment. Dual enrollment courses are offered by a postsecondary institution for college credit only. Concurrent enrollment are offered for both high school and college credit. Policies in this database generally refer to concurrent enrollment.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition For both concurrent enrollment and dual enrollment, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.

    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: General concurrent enrollment students must be accepted to the institution as non-degree/certificate-seeking students. They must have scored at least 19 on the ACT Reading subtest, or earned EXPLORE or PLAN scores projected to produce at least 19 on the ACT Reading subtest, or equivalent scores on the SAT, ASSET or COMPASS. Concurrent enrollment courses in English or math require a 19 or better on the respective ACT subtest or a score on the EXPLORE or PLAN projected to produce a 19 or better on the respective ACT subtest, or an equivalent score on the SAT, ASSET or COMPASS.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. Students may participate only in English, math, science and social studies courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For dual enrollment courses
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For concurrent enrollment courses
  • How state funds participating high schools Concurrent enrollment: Equal

    Dual enrollment: Reduced
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Concurrent enrollment: Equal

    Dual enrollment: Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Instructors of endorsed concurrent enrollment courses must have at least a master's degree that includes a minimum of 18 hours of course work in the subject area of the course. The instructor's credentials must be approved by the academic unit or chief academic officer of the postsecondary institution offering the course. The instructor must also have the relevant credentials and experience necessary to teach from the syllabus approved by the postsecondary institution.

    Concurrent enrollment courses must be approved through the postsecondary institution's normal process and listed in the postsecondary institution's catalog. The course must be listed in the Arkansas Course Transfer System. The course must meet the same standards, adopt the same learning outcomes (including any departmental exams applicable to the course), and use the same textbook and syllabus as the course offered on the postsecondary campus.

    The postsecondary institution must provide the instructor of the concurrent enrollment course with staff development, supervision and evaluation. This includes providing instructors with training and orientation in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy and administrative requirements before certifying instructors to teach courses. Concurrent enrollment instructors will receive continuing collegial interaction with college faculty through annual professional development, required seminars and site visits. Such interactions will address course content and delivery, student learning assessment, in-class evaluation and professional development in the field of study.

    Postsecondary: Higher education coordinating board policy provides that if an institution offers a concurrent enrollment course taught by a high school teacher on a high school campus, the institution must hold provisional membership in the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships. Postsecondary faculty teaching at a high school must undergo a criminal background check.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Postsecondary institutions must provide concurrent enrollment students with academic guidance counseling and the opportunity to use the on-campus library or other academic resources of the postsecondary institution.

    Legislation provides that institutions of higher education may collaborate to provide concurrent enrollment instructors with staff development, supervision and evaluation, and to provide concurrent enrollment students with academic guidance counseling and opportunities to use postsecondary campus libraries and other academic resources. While credit for a concurrent enrollment course may be awarded only by the postsecondary institution offering the course, legislation provides that nothing precludes institutions from collaborating to provide the course and award course credit.
    Sources Concurrent Enrollment: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-16-1202 through -1204, 6-18-223; 005 22 CARR 005, AR Admin. 5-15-06, 5-16-01
    Dual Enrollment: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-60-202; AR Admin. 5-15-06 & 5-16-01
    Both: Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board policy 5.16.01, as revised April 27, 2007

    California
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition While the community college does have the right to waive the cost of tuition to students, it is not required to do so. If tuition costs are not waived, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Parental permission
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes, community college no more than 11 units per semester. Cap on credit hours at California State University or University of California courses not set in state policy.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Awarding of high school and/or college credit to be determined by the student's school district and community college district governing boards.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A school district may count a student as full-time for funding purposes if the student is in grade 11 or 12, attends school at least three hours a day and is enrolled at a community college as a special part-time student.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources CAL. EDUC. CODE § 46146, 48800 through 48802, 76001, 76002, 76300(f)

    Colorado
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Fast Track. Postsecondary Enrollment Options allows 11th and 12th grade students to take college courses for both high school and college credit. Fast Track Program is for 12th-grade students who have fulfilled their high school graduation requirements and want to carry a full load of college courses and earn college credit their senior year.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary Enrollment Options: When a student enrolls in an institution, the district and postsecondary institution enter into a cooperative agreement.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Parents must first pay the postsecondary institution for the cost of a college course, and then are "... subject to reimbursement by the school district upon successful completion of such postsecondary courses." Different rules apply to students who qualify for free/reduced lunch.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Independent area vocational schools, all junior college district colleges, and all nonpublic institutions of higher education may also participate in Postsecondary Enrollment Options. (Fast Track does not specify beyond "accredited state institution of higher education.")
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: Fast Tracks courses may be offered at the high school or postsecondary institution.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Options
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For Fast Track: Student is in grade 12 and has completed all graduation requirements. For Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Student is deemed to be in need of coursework at a higher academic level than that available at the student's school or is deemed by the high school to be in need of a different environment. Students in grades 9-12 may participate.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy for Postsecondary Enrollment Options or Fast Track. However, the individual institution may limit the number of Postsecondary Enrollment Options students it allows to enroll. In addition, Postsecondary Enrollment Options students are reimbursed for up to two courses per semester, although districts may agree to pay for additional courses. 
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For Fast Track
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Options: However, high school credit may be denied by the high school principal and if denial is upheld by the local board on the basis that high school credit is inappropriate.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes (for Postsecondary Enrollment Options)
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Each district's accreditation summary must include the number and percentage of students enrolled in Postsecondary Enrollment Options, Fast Track or other local programs of dual credit or concurrent enrollment.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources Postsecondary Enrollment Options Act: COLO. REV. STAT § 22-35-101 through -111
    Fast Track Program: COLO. REV. STAT. § 22-34-101
    Both: 1 COLO. CODE REGS. § 301-1; Statewide Concurrent Enrollment Agreement
    Finance/Tuition: COLO. REV. STAT. § 22-35-105, 23-1-109, 22-35-102(2)

    Connecticut
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program High school partnerships program. Community-technical colleges may enter into agreements with local districts, directors of regional vocational-technical high schools and parochial high school administrators to offer high school students community college courses.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition "The (community) college will pay the costs of tuition for the high school students participating in the program and will waive all fees." Tuition is not paid for noncredit and extension courses. District and/or students pay book costs.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes — 2 courses a semester, though seniors in their final semester may take more based on their principal's recommendation.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: Local or regional boards may (but are not required to) award high school credit for dual enrollment courses.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal. If a high school student is enrolled for at least 5 hours a day, and part of that time is in a class that meets high school graduation requirements at an institution accredited by either the state department of higher education or regionally accredited, the school can count that student as an FTE for state funding purposes.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No, although where a local agreement has been established, the college must provide academic advisement and other appropriate supportive services. College are to use the preregistration process to assist participating high school students to make their preliminary selection of college courses.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Dual enrollment programs in Connecticut are primarily vocational. Parochial and home school students may participate. "The college should attempt to schedule sufficient courses at times convenient for high school students (e.g., late afternoons, evenings and Saturdays)."
    Sources CONN. GEN. STAT. ANN. § 10-221a, 10-261, 10a-8; Connecticut Board of Trustees of Community-Technical Colleges Policy Manual, Section 5.1.4

    Delaware
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment/Awarding of Dual Credit
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Payment of tuition varies depending upon the type of dual enrollment and district policy. Depending on the program and location, may be grant-funded, paid by the student or student's parent, or covered by waivers for eligible students.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Regionally accredited private institutions may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: Districts must offer multiple points of access to dual enrollment courses, including courses offered at the high school, at the postsecondary campus, online, or a combination of any of the above.
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: The "articulation agreement" between a district or school and the postsecondary partner must identify student eligibility criteria. Student eligibility requirements must be based on multiple indicators of readiness such as a combination of tests, course grades, teacher recommendations or portfolios.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. All students must be provided information about dual enrollment and dual credit opportunities.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. The articulation agreement between a school or district and postsecondary institution must specify the course syllabus and expected course competencies. Dual enrollment instructors must meet the requirements of a faculty member or adjunct faculty member at the postsecondary institution. All courses for which dual credit is granted must meet the requirements of the sponsoring postsecondary institution as outlined in the articulation agreement.

    In addition, all dual enrollment courses for which students receive both high school and postsecondary credit must incorporate any applicable state content standards.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: Transfer of dual enrollment credits is determined by each institution of higher education (IHE). The state is currently developing a Higher Education Transfer of Credit Matrix with the IHEs that will specify those courses that are transferable from one institution to another. In an effort to be transparent, the matrix will be available to students, parents and the general public on the department of education Web site and coordinated by the state higher education commission.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Yes. The state intends to use its P-20 data system to evaluate the relationship between K-12 coursetaking and postsecondary entry and success. It is anticipated that data generated by the P-20 data system will be used to determine which dual enrollment (and other dual credit) opportunities yield the best results.
    Unique characteristics No student may be denied access to dual enrollment courses because of the student's or family's inability to pay. Students must have multiple access to dual credit (i.e., AP, IB, Tech Prep) and dual enrollment courses, including courses offered at the high school, at the postsecondary institution, online, or a combination of any of the above.
    Sources Delaware Administrative Code 14 500 506; Judi Coffield, Policy Analyst, Delaware State Board of Education

    District of Columbia
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • No
  • Definition or title of program While there is no district-wide policy in the District of Columbia, dual enrollment is offered on an institutional basis.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • No state policy
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Unknown
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in district policy
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in district policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in district policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in district policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in district policy
    Unique characteristics None identified

    Florida
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: Districts and community college presidents must develop a comprehensive articulated acceleration program for the students enrolled in their respective school districts and service areas. Each state university president is encouraged to designate a university representative to participate in the development of the interinstitutional articulation agreements for each school district within the university service area.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Students enrolled in programs at public institutions are exempted from paying registration, tuition and laboratory fees — students enrolled at private institutions are not.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private colleges and universities may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: Legislation requires local boards to consider strategies and programs to meet demand for dual enrollment and other advanced courses, and provide access to dual enrollment on the high school campus whenever possible.
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: Exceptions to the GPA requirement may be made if agreed to by educational entities and are included in the interinstitutional articulation agreement.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: "District interinstitutional articulation agreements" between districts and postsecondary partners must identify student eligibility criteria. Agreements must also set forth institutional responsibilities regarding student screening prior to enrollment and monitoring student performance. Legislation directs the department of education to adopt guidelines to achieve comparability of student qualifications across districts.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. Two- and four-year institutions must allow students to complete at least 25% of program requirements, exclusive of transfer credit, through dual enrollment or other acceleration options.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. The high school or higher education institution that educates the student is allowed to claim 1/12 of FTE of state funding for each course that a student is enrolled in.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, with qualifications. The high school or higher education institution that educates the student is allowed to claim 1/12 of FTE of state funding for each course that a student is enrolled in.
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Agreements between districts and community colleges must delineate the process for informing students and parents about opportunities to participate in articulated acceleration programs.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. "District interinstitutional articulation agreements" between districts and postsecondary institutions must identify institutional responsibilities for maintaining instructional quality in dual enrollment courses. Legislation directs the department of education to adopt guidelines to achieve comparability in teacher qualifications for dual enrollment courses across districts.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: Any dual enrollment course that has a Statewide Course Numbering System number must be accepted by Florida public institutions as if the course were taken at their institution. Students can take courses with eligible private institutions that are not members of the course numbering system (SCNS), but that credit is not guaranteed to be accepted by public institutions. Only credit from public institutions and private institutions who participate in the SCNS is guaranteed to be accepted.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Yes. Agreements between districts and postsecondary partners must indicate the criteria by which the quality of dual enrollment courses and programs will be judged.
    Unique characteristics Florida has a common course numbering system that simplifies transfer of credits. Homeschool students are eligible to participate in dual enrollment programs, and may apply credit earned through dual enrollment to toward the completion of a home education program. Community colleges and universities may enter into dual enrollment agreements with nonpublic secondary schools.

    Districts may not refuse to enter into an agreement with a local community college if the community college has the capacity to offer dual enrollment courses.

    Statute authorizes advanced placement instruction to take place in dual enrollment courses, referred to as "joint dual enrollment and advanced placement courses."

    Each district/community college agreement must include a plan for the college to provide guidance services to participating students on the selection of dual enrollment courses. The guidance process should make maximum use of the automated advisement system for community colleges. The plan must ensure that each dual enrollment student is encouraged to identify a postsecondary education objective with which to guide the course selection.

    Legislation requires districts to annually assess the demand for dual enrollment and other advanced courses, and the local board must consider strategies and programs to meet that demand and include access to dual enrollment on the high school campus whenever possible.

    All local boards are required to develop, in collaboration with local workforce boards and postsecondary institutions approved to operate in the state, a strategic 5-year plan to address and meet local and regional workforce demands. Each plan must include provisions to have in place at least one operational career and professional academy by the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year. The strategic five-year plan must be based on opportunities for high school students to earn weighted or dual enrollment credit for higher-level career and technical courses.

    Career and professional academies, which must be offered by schools and districts, are defined as research-based programs that integrate a rigorous academic curriculum with an industry-specific curriculum aligned directly to priority workforce needs established by the regional workforce board. Legislation provides that one of the goals of such academies is to promote acceleration mechanisms, such as dual enrollment, articulated credit, or occupational completion points, so that students may earn postsecondary credit while in high school. All career courses offered in a career and professional academy must lead to industry certification or college credit linked directly to the career theme of the course. At least 50% of students in a career course must earn industry certifications or college credits during the second year the course is offered in order for the course to be offered a third year. At least 66% of students enrolled in such a course must achieve industry certifications or college credits during the third year the course is offered in order for it to be offered a fourth year and thereafter.
    Sources FLA. STAT. ANN. § 1007.235, 1003.436(1)(a), 1007.27, 1007.271, 1007.272, 1003.491(2) and (3)(j), 1003.493(1), (2)(f) and (5), 1011.62 (1)(i); FLA. ADMIN. CODE ANN. r. 6A-14.031, 6C-6.006, 6C-7.008, 6C2-2.02414

    Georgia
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has three programs: ACCELDual Enrollment and Joint Enrollment. ACCEL is a lottery-funded dual enrollment program administered by the Georgia Student Finance Commission that allows 11th and 12th grade students to take certain courses (not technical certificate courses) for high school and postsecondary credit. Dual Enrollment allows students to take courses at public or private institutions for high school and postsecondary credit. Joint Enrollment allows high school students to take courses at public or private institutions only for postsecondary credit.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Accel and dual enrollment students in non-degree granting programs that qualify for HOPE Grants: Student tuition, fees and a book allowance are paid for through the state's lottery funds. Students cannot receive more than a cumulative total of 190 quarter hours or 127 semester hours of Accel, HOPE Grant, and/or HOPE Scholarship payments.

    Dual & joint enrollment for students not qualifying for state lottery funding: Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. In addition, students living more than 25 miles from a degree-granting public college or university may attend courses at any two- or four-year regionally accredited degree-granting nonproprietary college or university. Private, nonprofit, accredited institutions and proprietary institutions may participate in the Accel program.
    Where courses provided
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: Or student age 16 or older
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Accel program: parental permission if the student is a minor
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework. Students in the Accel program may participate only in English, math, science, social studies and foreign language courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Reduced funding for dual enrollment students
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. All eligible students must receive general information about programs. Students interested in participating must be provided counseling services before enrolling. Counseling must include information about the institutions and courses eligible for participation; the process for granting academic credits; financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials. Students must be given the name of a contact person at each eligible institution for information about the program.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Districts must provide counseling services to eligible students and their parents before students enroll in postsecondary courses. Such counseling services must provide information on available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a course. Before enrolling in a postsecondary course, the student and student's parent must sign a form stating they have received the counseling required by statute and understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in participating in the program.

    Private high school students are eligible to participate in the Accel lottery-funded dual enrollment program.
    Sources GA. CODE ANN. § 20-2-161.1, 20-2-160(a), 20-3-53; GA. COMP. R. & REGS. r. 160-4-2-.16, 160-4-2-.34, 160-4-2-.34(1)(a); Accel program regulations, 2008-2009 award year, revised August 1, 2008; Hope Grant Program Regulations - 302 & 306.1

    Hawaii
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Running Start
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Unless the student is from a low-income family that qualifies for financial aid from the state's Gear Up program, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Student may be required to take a placement test that demonstrates the student's ability to succeed at the college level.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Other qualifications may be set by the department of education or University of Hawaii.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources HAW. REV. STAT. ANN. § 302A-401, 304A-803, 304A-2351, University of Hawaii Running Start Web site

    Idaho
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: However, all high schools in the state must offer "Advanced Opportunities," which may include dual credit, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Tech Prep. In addition, the state board has directed postsecondary institutions to work with districts to provide dual credit options, and and has made a review of each institution’s efforts in this area a part of each president’s annual performance review.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition For a pupil enrolled in a postsecondary enrollment options course, the school district may make payments or partial payments for courses taken for secondary credit. The school district superintendent cannot make payments to a postsecondary institution for a course taken for postsecondary credit only. The district superintendent cannot make payments to a postsecondary institution for a course from which a student officially withdraws during the first 14 days of the semester or for courses for audit.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private two- and four-year institutions, and accredited private trade and technical schools may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: Legislation provides that the Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) must work with institutions of higher education to provide dual credit coursework.
  • Other
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: At the time a student enrolls in a course, the student must indicate whether the course is being taken for secondary, postsecondary, or dual credit. A student taking several courses may designate some for secondary credit, some for postsecondary credit and some for dual credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A high school student enrolled in the Postsecondary Enrollment program who attends school at least four hours a day will be funded at the same level as a full-time student.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Students in grades 10 and 11 must receive general information about the program.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Postsecondary institutions work closely with high schools to deliver college courses that are identical to those offered on the college campus. In addition, state board standards for dual enrollment programs are based on the National Concurrent Enrollment Partnership Standards created by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP), and specify:
  • Instructors teaching college or university courses through dual credit meet the academic requirements for faculty and instructors teaching in postsecondary, or provisions are made to ensure instructors are capable of providing quality college-level instruction through ongoing support and professional development.
  • The postsecondary institution provides high school instructors with training and orientation in course curriculum, student assessment criteria, course philosophy, and dual credit administrative requirements before certifying the instructors to teach the college/university’s courses.
  • Instructors teaching dual credit courses are part of a continuing collegial interaction, through professional development, such as seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institutions’ faculty and dual credit administration. This interaction addresses issues such as course content, course delivery, assessment, evaluation, and professional development in the field of study.
  • High school faculty are evaluated by using the same classroom performance standards and processes used to evaluate college faculty.
  • Dual credit students are held to the same course content standards and standards of achievement as those expected of students in postsecondary courses.
  • Every course offered through a dual credit program is annually reviewed by postsecondary faculty from that discipline and dual credit teachers/staff to assure that grading standards meet those in on-campus sections.
  • Dual credit students are assessed using the same methods (e.g. papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs, etc.) as their on-campus counterparts.
  • Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Yes. State board of education standards for dual enrollment programs are based on the standards developed by the National Association of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP). These include:
  • "The dual credit program practices are assessed and evaluated based on criteria established by the school, institution and state board to include at least the following: course evaluations by dual credit students, follow-up of the dual credit graduates who are college or university freshmen, and a review of instructional practices at the high school to ensure program quality."
  • "A data collection system has been established based on criteria established by the high school, institution and state board to track dual credit students to provide data regarding the impact of dual credit programs in relation to college entrance, retention, matriculation from high school and college, impact on college entrance tests, etc. A study is conducted every 5 years on dual credit graduates who are freshmen and sophomores in a college or university."
  • Unique characteristics Before students enroll in postsecondary courses, districts must, "to the extent possible," provide counseling so that students and parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The district must provide information including who may enroll, what institutions and sources are available under this program, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the pupil enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the pupil's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the student and parents. The person providing counseling must encourage students and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions prior to the semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate and adequate.

    Before enrolling, the student and the student's parents must sign a form that may be obtained from a postsecondary institution stating that they have received the above information and that they understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The superintendent of public instruction must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.

    Once a student has enrolled in a postsecondary course or program, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Statute relating to the Idaho Education Network (IEN) provides legislative intent that Idaho will be a leader in the use of technology to deliver advanced high school curricula and concurrent course credit.
    Sources IDAHO CODE § 33-203, 33-5101 through -5110, 33-5508, 67-5745D(4)(b); IDAPA 08.02.03.007 and .106; Jason Hancock, Idaho State Department of Education

    Illinois
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. Administrative rule allows community colleges to admit high school students to college courses.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student or school district (locally determined)
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Students must satisfy course placement tests or course prerequisites.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Students must have appropriate academic qualifications, a high level of motivation and adequate time to devote to studying a college-level course.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: The determination of whether a community college course is offered for concurrent high school and college credit must be made at the secondary level, according to the school's policies and practices of the district.
  • How state funds participating high schools Not defined
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Instructors of community college courses offered at high schools must be selected, employed and evaluated by the community college. They must be selected from full-time faculty and/or from adjunct faculty with appropriate credentials and demonstrated teaching competencies at the college level. The course outlines must be the same as for courses offered on campus and at other off-campus sites and must contain the content articulated with colleges and universities in the state. Course prerequisites, descriptions, outlines, requirements, learning outcomes and methods of evaluating students must be the same as for on-campus offerings.

    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Every superintendent must report to the state board of education the number of students in the district taking courses at any community college, along with the name and number of the course or courses that each such student is taking. The state board must annually assemble all such reported data, both by individual school district and by educational service region totals.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources 105 ILL. COMP. STAT. 5/2-3.142, 5/10-21.4; ILL. ADMIN. CODE tit. 23, § 1501.402, 1501.507

    Indiana
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has three programs: the Postsecondary Enrollment Program, Double Up for College, and Fast Track to College.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: Every high school must provide a minimum of two dual credit courses. The Indiana concurrent enrollment partnership (CEP) is tasked with researching fiscal costs to expand dual credit for each 11th and 12th grade student for free or at a reduced tuition.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Double Up for College: Students eligible for free/reduced lunch must have their tuition waived. The university/community college may waive any student's tuition, but is not required to do so.

    Post Secondary Enrollment Program and Fast Track to College: A school may grant financial assistance to a student enrolled in a Post Secondary Enrollment Program but is not required to.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both (for Postsecondary Enrollment, Double Up and Fast Track to College). Accredited private colleges and universities may also participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Program.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Program and Double Up for College
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Program, Double Up for College and Fast Track to College
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Program and Double Up for College
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Program and Double Up: However, a local board may establish procedures to allow students below grade 11 to participate in the program.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Program and Double Up
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For Fast Track to College: Students must be either (1) at least 19 and not enrolled in a high school or (2) at least 17 and have consent from the high school the student attended most recently.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For Double Up: The postsecondary institution may, with the school corporation, determine the terms and conditions under which a student may be admitted to the program. The Indiana Commission for Higher Education's Dual Credit Policy (2005) requires that postsecondary institutions use the same admissions policies for dual credit courses as used for other on-campus courses.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll in Postsecondary Enrollment Program or Double Up as part- or full-time student. However, barring exceptional circumstances, students should not earn more than 15 semester hours of postsecondary credit through courses offered at high schools.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary Enrollment Program: A student completing an approved course receives high school credit. The contract between a district and institution must establish the terms and conditions under which secondary and postsecondary credit will be awarded.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. All students in grades 10 and 11 must receive information about the program by February 1 each year.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. The postsecondary partner in a Double Up program, by agreement with a school corporation, may ensure that the content and rigor of a course offered is adequate to warrant providing credit to a student as if the student took the course at the postsecondary campus. The postsecondary partner may set the criteria for a faculty member, an instructor, or other individual responsible for teaching a course with the state educational institution responsible for hiring the personnel to instruct dual credit courses taught by the state educational institution and school corporation responsible for hiring personnel to instruct dual credit courses taught by the high school.

    The commission for higher education's "Policy on Dual Credit Courses Taught in High Schools by High School Faculty" requires that:
  • All secondary students taking dual credit courses meet the same academic prerequisites for taking those courses as apply to students taking the same courses on the postsecondary campus; beyond that, the secondary school and the postsecondary campus may jointly establish additional criteria for determining how students are selected into dual credit courses.
  • Course syllabi used for dual credit courses be equivalent to course syllabi used in the same courses taught on the postsecondary campus, including equivalent textbooks, class assignments, laboratory equipment, and examinations.
  • Student learning outcomes expected for dual credit courses be the same as student learning outcomes expected for the same courses taught on the postsecondary campus.
  • An academic unit on the postsecondary campus be responsible for monitoring, throughout the school year, the delivery and quality of dual credit instruction; such monitoring must include visits to the secondary class.
  • The secondary school and academic unit on the postsecondary campus work together to identify instructors of dual credit courses, whose final approval rests with the academic unit on campus and who must have credentials consistent with credentials required by on-campus faculty.
  • The academic unit on the postsecondary campus be responsible for ensuring that professional development opportunities are available and communicated to secondary faculty teaching dual credit courses.
  • The postsecondary campus establish a mechanism for evaluating and documenting, on a regular basis, the performance of students who complete dual credit courses.


  • In addition, the Indiana concurrent enrollment partnership created through 2008 legislation is tasked with establishing unified rigorous academic standards and assessment requirements and sharing best practices that comply with appropriate national accreditation standards for Double Up for College programs. The partnership must report annually to the department of education and commission on higher education; the report must include an assessment of the academic standards required by dual enrollment programs in the state.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: Double Up for College: Courses offered through the program must be listed in the (1) statewide core transfer library courses that are transferable on all campuses of the state educational institutions, or (2) articulation agreements that apply to any campus in the Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana system and to Vincennes University and draw from liberal arts and the technical, professional, and occupational fields.
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary Enrollment Program: An institution other than that at which the student earned credit is not required to award postsecondary credit, if the course is not in the CTL or has no transfer equivalent for courses that are taught in an on-campus setting.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. Each district (school corporation) must annually report to the department of education a list of students enrolled in the program, and the courses successfully completed by each student enrolled in the program.

    Yes, for Fast Track to College: Ivy Tech Community College must annually report to the education roundtable the number of program participants and diplomas granted while earning credits for a certificate program or an associate's degree. Vincennes University and any four-year institution participating in the program must report to the education roundtable the number of program participants and diplomas granted.

    In addition, the Indiana concurrent enrollment partnership is required to report annually to the department of education and the commission for higher education on the following for early college, dual credit and dual enrollment programs:
  • An assessment of the academic standards required by the programs
  • Student performance under the programs
  • College attainment for students enrolled in the programs
  • Program costs
  • Student demand for the programs
  • Demographic information for students in the programs
  • The cost of, access to, and ease of transfer of courses in the programs.
  • Program evaluation component Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. Legislation directs the department of education, in consultation with the commission for higher education, to evaluate the program annually and report to the Indiana state board of education concerning the program.
    Unique characteristics Postsecondary Enrollment Program: A district (school corporation) representative must meet with each student who intends to enroll in the program and discuss:
  • The courses in which the student may enroll
  • The postsecondary credit the student earns upon successful completion of a course
  • The consequences of the student's failure to successfully complete a course
  • The student's schedule
  • The financial obligations of the student and the school under the program
  • The responsibilities of the student, the student's parent, and the school under the program
  • Other matters concerning the program.


  • Legislation directs the department of education, in consultation with the commission for higher education, to establish guidelines for the Postsecondary Enrollment Program. The guidelines must encourage participation by students at all achievement levels and in a variety of academic and vocational subjects.

    Double Up for College: A school corporation may, by agreement with a state educational institution, offer counseling concerning an early college, dual credit or dual enrollment course, including
  • Notice of the course and schedule
  • Available postsecondary credit
  • Student responsibilities
  • Tuition and other costs
  • Consequences of the failure to complete a course
  • Other matters concerning the program and opportunities presented by the program.


  • Double Up for College: After June 30, 2008, a state educational institution or campus of a state educational institution that offers dual credit courses in liberal arts, professional, or career and technical disciplines must be accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships.

    2008 legislation creates the Indiana concurrent enrollment partnership (to expire July 2009). The purpose of the partnership is to:
  • Establish unified rigorous academic standards and assessment requirements and share best practices that comply with appropriate national accreditation standards for concurrent enrollment programs
  • Coordinate outreach and recruitment of Indiana students and teachers to participate in concurrent enrollment programs
  • Develop a plan to expand the dual enrollment program to every high school in Indiana
  • By December 1, 2008, develop a fiscal analysis and make recommendations to the department, the budget committee and the general assembly to make two dual enrollment courses available without tuition and fees or at reduced tuition and fees to students in grades 11 and 12 beginning with the 2010-2011 school year
  • Report annually to the department of education and the commission for higher education on early college, dual credit and dual enrollment programs
  • Offer recommendations on concurrent enrollment matters as requested by the state board and the commission for higher education.
  • Sources Postsecondary Enrollment Program: IND. CODE. ANN. § 21-43-4; IND. ADMIN. CODE tit. 511, r. 6-10-1 and -4
    Double Up for College Program: IND. CODE. ANN. § 21-43-5, 21-14-8-1, 21-43-5-10
    Fast Track to College Program: IND. CODE. ANN. § 21-43-6 (at Ivy Tech Community College), 21-43-7 (at Vincennes University), 21-43-8 (at a state educational institution), 21-43-4-12
    All programs: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-20-36-1 through -6, 21-43-1 and -2

    Iowa
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment. Postsecondary Enrollment Options allows students to take college courses at a two- or four-year institution. The district will pay for the course if the course is not offered at the high school. Concurrent Enrollment courses, typically taught by a high school teacher at a high school, are offered through a contractual agreement between a community college and the school district.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: For both Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition District pays by June 30 (end of school year). Statute bars institutions from charging students for tuition. However, if the student does not complete or receive credit for the course, the student is responsible for all tuition and other course costs, and must reimburse the district.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited private institutions may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Courses may be offered through regional and career academies. A regional academy is a district-established program to which multiple school districts send students in grades 9-12, and which may include internet-based coursework and courses delivered via the Iowa communications network. A regional academy must offer advanced level courses, and may offer career and technical courses.A regional academy course cannot qualify as a concurrent enrollment course. A career academy course may qualify as a concurrent enrollment course if it meets the requirements of section 261E.7.
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Options. Students in grades 9-12 may participate in Concurrent Enrollment courses.
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: For both Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment: Student must meet enrollment requirements, minimum performance measures on any academic assessments that may be required, and course prerequisites set by the postsecondary institution.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment: Student must demonstrate proficiency in reading, mathematics, and science. If a student is not proficient in one or more of the content areas, the school board may establish alternative but equivalent qualifying performance measures including but not limited to additional administrations of the state assessment, portfolios of student work, student performance rubric, or end-of-course assessments.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No for Postsecondary Enrollment Options, yes for Concurrent Enrollment. However, a student enrolled on a full-time basis may not receive payment for all courses in which the student is enrolled.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Information about the availability and requirements of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment programs must be included in every district's student registration handbook. Information about the programs must be provided to the student and the student's parent prior to the development of the student's core curriculum plan.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. A high school teacher teaching a college course must:
  • Meet the standards and requirements that other full-time instructors teaching in the academic department are required to meet and that are approved by the appropriate postsecondary administration.
  • Collaborate, as appropriate, with other secondary and postsecondary faculty in the subject area.
  • Provide curriculum and instruction that is accepted as college-level work as determined by the institution.
  • Use valid and reliable assessment measures.
  • Receive appropriate orientation and information about the institution's expectations.


  • Secondary and postsecondary instructors must:
  • Be provided with appropriate orientation and training in secondary and postsecondary professional development related to curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, policy implementation, technology, and discipline issues.
  • Receive adequate notification of an assignment to teach a course under this chapter and shall be provided adequate preparation time to ensure that the course is taught at the college-level.
  • The eligible postsecondary institution must provide the teacher or instructor with ongoing communication and access to instructional resources and support, and must encourage the teacher or instructor to participate in the postsecondary institution's academic departmental activities. The institution must ensure that the courses provided achieve the same learning outcomes as similar courses offered in the subject area and are accepted as college-level work.


    Postsecondary faculty teaching a course away from a postsecondary campus must undergo a background check.

    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: Community college credits transfer to public postsecondary institutions. However, some credits may not apply to a particular major/program of study at the institution.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. 2008 legislation directs the state board, in collaboration with the board of directors of each community college, to adopt rules that clearly define data and information elements to be collected related to Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment courses. The data elements must include the following:
  • The course title and whether the course supplements, rather than supplants, a school district course.
  • An unduplicated enrollment count of eligible students participating in the program.
  • The actual costs and revenues generated for concurrent enrollment. An aligned unique student identifier system must be established by the department for K-12 and community college students.
  • Degree, certifications, and other qualifications to meet the minimum hiring standards.
  • Salary information including regular contracted salary and total salary.
  • Credit hours and laboratory contact hours and other data on instructional time.
  • Other information comparable to the data regarding teachers collected in the basic education data survey.

    All postsecondary institutions providing postsecondary courses to high school students must include the unique student identifier assigned to students in the K-12 system as a part of the institution's student data management system. Postsecondary institutions must cooperate with the department on data requests related to the programming, and must collect data and report to the department on the proportion of females and minorities enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-oriented educational opportunities provided. The department must submit the programming data and the department's findings and recommendations to the general assembly annually by January 15.
  • Program evaluation component Yes. Institutions providing a course for dual high school and postsecondary credit must review the course on a regular basis for continuous improvement, follow up with students to use information gained from them to improve course delivery and content, and share data on course progress and outcomes with the collaborative partners involved with the delivery of the programming and with the state department of education, as needed.

    In addition, 2008 legislation directs the department of education, subject to an adequate appropriation of funds, in collaboration with representatives of regents universities, accredited private institutions, community colleges, and school districts, to conduct a study of the measures necessary for the successful implementation of the senior year plus program (Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Concurrent Enrollment). The study must include a review of provisions of statute or administrative rules for purposes of implementing the core curriculum adopted pursuant to section 256.7, subsection 26. The study must also address barriers to the transfer of credit between secondary schools and the postsecondary system and its institutions. The department
    must submit its findings and recommendations, including recommendations for statutory and administrative rule changes necessary, to the general assembly by November 14, 2008.
    Unique characteristics Students in nonpublic schools and in the state school for the deaf and the Iowa braille and sight saving school may also participate.

    Districts, in collaboration with teachers/instructors, must provide ongoing communication about course expectations, including a syllabus that describes the content, teaching strategies, performance measures, and resource materials used in the course, and academic progress to the student and student's parents. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that students and their parents receive appropriate course orientation and information, including a summary of applicable policies and procedures, the establishment of a permanent transcript, policies on dropping courses, a student handbook, information describing student responsibilities, and institutional procedures for academic credit transfer.

    The institution must also ensure that students have access to student support services, including tutoring, counseling, advising, library, writing and math labs, and computer labs, and student activities, excluding postsecondary intercollegiate athletics.

    2008 legislation directs the department to develop and make available to secondary and postsecondary students, parents, districts, accredited nonpublic schools, and eligible postsecondary institutions an Internet-based clearinghouse of information that allows students to identify participation options within the senior year plus program and transferability between educational systems, subject to an appropriation by the general assembly for this purpose. The internet-based resource must provide links to other similar resources available through various Iowa postsecondary institution systems. The internet-based resource must also identify course transferability and articulation between the secondary and postsecondary systems in Iowa and between the various Iowa postsecondary systems.

    Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Priority may be given to postsecondary students before enrolling 11th and 12th grade students in courses. However, once an 11th or 12th grade student has enrolled in a postsecondary course, the student cannot be displaced by another student for the duration of the course.
    Sources IOWA CODE ANN. § 260.C1, 261C.1 through .9, 261E.1 through .12, 257.6(b); IOWA ADMIN. CODE r. 281-15.1(256) through .6, 281-21.2(260C) and .10, 281-22.1(261C) through .6, 281-24.1(260C), 281-34.15(218,233A,261C), 281-97.2(257)

    Kansas
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • State has both mandatory and voluntary dual enrollment programs
  • Notes/Citation: Under program set in KAN. ADMIN. REGS. 88-26-3, a high school student who meets certain criteria may enroll in a community college ("mandatory offering"). In the form established in statute, a district and a postsecondary institution may create an agreement under which a high school teacher teaches a college-level course at the high school during the regular school day ("voluntary offering").
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is an amount negotiated by the school district and the college/university under this program. Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited independent institutions may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: Students in grades 10-12 must either have a minimum 3.0 GPA, or an ACT or SAT score above the national average.
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: Only required for students who do not meet the minimum GPA/ACT/SAT score requirement, have passed an "ability-to-benefit test" approved by the U.S. Department of Education, and will attend a technical program offered in a community college.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Student must have "demonstrated the ability to benefit from participation in the regular curricula of eligible postsecondary education institutions...."
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy for courses offered through KAN. ADMIN. REGS. 88-26-3, yes for credits earned through concurrent enrollment partnership programs — no more than 24 credits.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: A local board may but is not required to award high school credit for concurrent enrollment coursework.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A 10th, 11th or 12th grade student who is concurrently enrolled in a school district and a postsecondary institution is counted as one FTE pupil if the student is enrolled in both programs for 5/6th of the time. If the student is not enrolled for less than 5/6th of the time, his/her enrollment is determined to the nearest 1/10 of full-time.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. When courses are taught at the high school, the agreement between the school district and postsecondary institution must "include collaborative faculty development programming such as pedagogy, instructional design, course management, instructional delivery skill improvement, curricular reform initiatives, ... and student success assessment strategies." The agreement must also list the principles for ensuring program quality.

    Such courses must be approved through the postsecondary institution's curriculum approval process. The Kansas Board of Regents Policy and Procedures Manual (last updated June 12, 2008) sets forth additional criteria for dual enrollment courses taught at high schools by high school teachers, including:
  • The high school and college-level prerequisites, the content of courses, course goals and objectives, must be the same as those for the same courses offered to students at any location or by any delivery method.
  • Materials such as textbooks used must be comparable to those used in the same course throughout the institution. Procedures for selection of textbooks and related material by faculty who teach concurrently enrolled students must follow adopted postsecondary institutional policies.
  • Faculty teaching college-level concurrent enrollment partnership (CEP) courses must attain instructional eligibility by meeting one of the following standards: (1) demonstrate possession of a masters degree with 18 credit hours in the assigned course content; or (2) demonstrate possession of a bachelors degree, with at least 24 credit hours in the assigned course content and utilize the same final examination as given in a representative section of the course taught at the institution awarding the course credit and apply the same scoring rubric for the assigned course as that used in the on-campus class. Institutions may set higher standards. Teaching evaluations must be conducted. The postsecondary institution will provide instructors with orientation and ongoing professional development.
  • Before approving the instructors to teach college-level CEP courses, the postsecondary institution must provide high school instructors with orientation and training in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and CEP administrative requirements
  • Each CEP must include an implementation plan for ensuring that instructors teaching concurrently enrolled partnership students are part of a continuing collegial interaction through professional development, seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institution’s faculty and administration of the partnership.
  • Courses offered through a concurrent enrollment partnership must be reviewed annually by faculty in the discipline at the postsecondary partner to assure that grading standards (i.e., papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs), course management, instructional delivery and content meet or exceed those in regular on-campus sections.
  • Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. According to the board of regents policy manual, "The Regents System will track students who have participated in concurrent enrollment partnerships and other forms of concurrent enrollment." Institutions must report the following for the Kansas Postsecondary Database:
  • Directory information for each high school student enrolled
  • Credit hours generated by each high school student
  • Credentials of faculty teaching CEP courses
  • CEP credit hours generated by each high school student.


  • Every other year, public postsecondary institution must provide the board of regents with a list of high schools involved in "Concurrent Enrollment Partnership (CEP)" agreements (in which high school faculty teach college courses). For each institution, the board of regents will select up to two high schools for reporting. For each high school chosen, each institution will submit the following:
  • Copy of the CEP agreement including (but not limited to) the implementation plan for professional development of instructors of CEP students and the student guide for CEP students
  • The report resulting from the review of CEP courses by postsecondary faculty and dates of most recent review of all CEP courses, aggregated by discipline.


  • Each institution must also forward to the board of regents a copy of the report resulting from the institutional review of CEPs to be conducted at least every five years.

    All reports will be reviewed for compliance and the results will be reported by 2010.

    Program evaluation component Yes. Each concurrent enrollment partnership (CEP) (in which high school teachers provide college courses at the high school) must be reviewed at least every five years by the postsecondary partner to ensure compliance and quality considerations.
    Unique characteristics Homeschooled students may also participate in dual enrollment programs.

    Students must be provided with a student guide, created as part of the "CEP" partnership between the high school and postsecondary institution, that outlines their responsibilities in the learning experience as well as a description of how courses may be transferred in the Regents system. Advising of students who desire to enroll in CEP classes must be carried out by both the high school and postsecondary institution.

    Sources KAN. STAT. ANN. § 72-11a01 through 11a05, 72-6407(a)(2), 71-601; Kansas Board of Regents Policy and Procedures Manual, last updated June 12, 2008

    Kentucky
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Dual Credit and Dual Enrollment. Dual Credit is defined as "a college-level course of study ... in which a high school student receives credit from both the high school and postsecondary institution in which the student is enrolled upon completion of a single class or designated program of study." Dual Enrollment means "a college-level course of study ... in which a student is enrolled in a high school and postsecondary institution" at the same time. Participating in the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky can be defined as "dual credit" or "dual enrollment."
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: However, all high schools must offer Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual credit or dual enrollment.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition The state does not address the issue of tuition for dual enrollment programs in either legislation or rules. Thus, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Independent institutions may also participate. Data collected by the Council on Postsecondary Education indicate dual enrollment participation levels at two-year, four-year and independent institutions from 2001 to 2007.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: All students willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to dual credit and dual enrollment courses provided they have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For "dual enrollment" students
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For "dual credit" students
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Legislation directs the Council on Postsecondary Education, collaborating with the Kentucky Board of Education and the Education Professional Standards Board, to "develop guidelines for content knowledge and teacher training in dual enrollment and dual credit programs offered in Kentucky."
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Postsecondary institutions report student participation in dual enrollment courses each year, by type of institution (two-year, four-year, independent) and by individual institution. Data not reported on dual credit participation.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Legislation directs the department of education, upon adequate receipt of federal funding, to (1) identify, in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward advanced placement or dual enrollment instruction, and (2) identify current and future funding sources for advanced placement or dual enrollment instructional programs and the amount of funds available or anticipated from those sources.

    Every high school's school-based decision making council must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), dual enrollment and dual credit courses that recognizes that all students have the right to participate in a rigorous and academically challenging curriculum. All students willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to AP, IB, dual credit and dual enrollment courses provided they have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards.
    Sources KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 158.007, 158.622, 160.348, 164.002, 164.098, 164.580; KDE Interagency Dual Credit Taskforce "Definitions"; OAG 68-150

    Louisiana
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: TOPS-Tech Early Start Award, and Early Start. TOPS-Tech Early Start Award provides scholarships for 11th and 12th graders to pursue an industry-based occupational or vocational education credential at a public postsecondary institution. Early Start provides tuition assistance for students to enroll in college-level, enrichment/development and/or work skills courses for dual credit. (Students in enrichment/developmental courses will receive postsecondary institutional credit but not degree credit).

    In addition, voluntary agreements between high schools and postsecondary partners are referred to here as Traditional Dual Enrollment, in which a student may enroll in a public two- or four-year institution, with most program parameters set by the postsecondary institution and high school. The database indicates where policy or state-level practice touch upon such agreements.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition TOPS-Tech Early Start: The state pays the postsecondary institution $50 per credit hour, up to $150 per course, for a student enrolled in specific courses. A student may take two courses in the 11th grade and two in the 12th under this program.

    Early Start: The state pays the postsecondary institution $100 per credit hour, up to $300 per course to cover the student's cost of enrolling in specific courses.

    Traditional dual enrollment: Student pays tuition.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both TOPS-TECH Early Start Award, Early Start and traditional dual enrollment: Both. Independent institutions may also participate in Early Start.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start and Early Start
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start and Early Start
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: As of September 2008, the Louisiana Virtual School offers dual enrollment American history, English IV, English literature, fine arts survey, advanced math (Math 1020 and Math 1090)
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For traditional dual enrollment: Courses may be provided at "an appropriate neutral setting"
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start. For Early Start: Students must be in grades 11-12 and at least 15 years old
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: For Early Start
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start: Student must score at least 15 on the English and math sections of the PLAN. For Early Start: Students must have taken either the PLAN, ACT or SAT and those scores are on file at the high school (minimum scores on ACT, PLAN or SAT vary depending on whether student is enrolling in a college-level degree credit course, enrichment/developmental course, or work skills course).
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start: Student must have prepared a 5-year education and career plan, including a sequence of related courses with a career focus, and must have passing scores on the English and math sections of the graduation exam. For Early Start: Students must be in good standing as defined by the high school, must have parental permission, and to enroll in college level or developmental courses, must be on track to complete the Regents/TOPS core by high school graduation. Eff. Class of 2012: Regents/TOPS core requirement replaced by requirement that student be on track to complete the Louisiana Core 4 curriculum. To enroll in work skills courses, a student must be on track to graduate from high school and have declared a career area of concentration in high school.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For traditional dual enrollment: Determined by the postsecondary institution. Postsecondary institutions must set entry requirements, guided by the requirements of the board of regents' Academic Affairs Policy 2.18 - Minimum Requirements for Placement into Entry- Level, College-Level Mathematics and English.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn For TOPS Tech Early Start: Yes — 2 courses a semester.

    For Early Start: Not set in state policy. However, to continue enrollment, a student must have succesfully completed prior dual credit courses. If a student withdraws from a course, the student must receive permission from both the high school and college to continue enrollment in subsequent courses.

    For traditional dual enrollment: Determined by the postsecondary institution.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For Early Start
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For traditional dual enrollment. The postsecondary institution and partnering high school determine whether the student will earn high school, postsecondary or dual credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes for TOPS Tech Early Start and Early Start: The Louisiana Student Financial Assistance Commission must fully inform Louisiana public high school students and their parents on the requirements of and procedures for applying for and maintaining the TOPS Tech Early Start award and applying for and maintaining eligibility for the Early Start program.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes, for TOPS Tech Early Start, Early Start and traditional dual enrollment. Board of regents policy provides that high school and postsecondary partners must jointly determine the appropriate level of course content, and that course content may not be any less than that which is required of a similar course open to postsecondary students only. High school and postsecondary partners must jointly agree on the appointment of secondary or postsecondary instructors to provide dual enrollment courses. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that high school teachers possess the necessary qualifications and meet appropriate regional and program accreditation requirements for instruction.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: For Early Start: College level credit courses listed in the board of regents General Education Articulation Matrix and accepted for transfer credit.
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: For TOPS Tech Early Start and traditional dual enrollment. For Early Start: Technical and developmental courses are not for transfer.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes, for both programs. TOPS Tech Early Start: Postsecondary institutions must include TOPS Tech Early Start students as they would traditional college students: Upon request by the Louisiana Student Financial Assistance Commission, the institution must report admission and full-time undergraduate enrollment;  eligibility for, or enrollment in, a course of study leading to initial teacher certification; enrollment in math or chemistry as a major while pursuing teacher certification; graduate or undergraduate enrollment in wildlife forestry or marine science; semester hours attempted; semester hours earned; semester quality points earned; and resignation from the institution or withdrawal from all courses.

    The board of regents, in consultation with the Louisiana Student Financial Assistance Commission, must annually report to the governor and house and senate education committees before each legislative session on the program. The report must include a written review and analysis of Early Start Award use by students, the benefits of such use, and the impact on subsequent use by students of TOPS-Tech awards.

    Early Start: Each participating postsecondary institution must report student level outcome data to the board of regents according to specifications defined by the board of regents.
    Program evaluation component Partial, for TOPS Tech Early Start and Early Start: The Louisiana Student Financial Assistance Commission must perform audits of participating high schools and postsecondary institutions to ensure compliance with program requirements.
    Unique characteristics TOPS Tech Early Start: Students must be pursuing an industry-based occupational or vocational education credential that (1) is identified by the Occupuation Forecasting Conference as a credential for an occupation in top demand in Louisiana; (2) is recognized by the State Industry-Based Certification Council; and (3) is approved by the state board and board of supervisors of community and technical colleges.

    Early Start: Students may enroll in enrichment/developmental courses, provided they meet specified eligibility criteria. Students in such courses will receive postsecondary institutional credit but not degree credit.

    High school and postsecondary partners must jointly ensure access to physical facilities, access to appropriate equipment, and access to appropriate learning resources; both partners must fully inform enrolled students of the type and applicability of dual enrollment credit.

    Nonpublic and homeschool students who are at least 15, in grade 11 or 12 and who meet any other eligibility criteria set by the board of regents may participate in traditional dual enrollment programs. State funds may not be used to pay such students' tuition, but the amount of tuition charged must be the same as that charged a student in a public high school. 2008 legislation directs the board of regents, in consultation with the state student financial assistance commission, to submit a study before the start of the 2009 legislative session on the estimated cost of providing state dollars to fund the participation of nonpublic and homeschool students in dual enrollment programs, beginning with the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
    Sources LA. REV. STAT. ANN. § 17:3048.5, 17:3137; LAC 28:CXV.2329, .2389, 28:IV.1001 through .1017, 28:IV:1401 through .1417, 28:I.1712(2)(c); Louisiana Board of Regents Academic Affairs Policy 2.19; Louisiana Early Start Framework, effective 2008-2009 school year; Louisiana Virtual School Web site; Theresa Hay, Louisiana Board of Regents; State Higher Education Funding Guidelines

    Maine
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. The state also has a smaller dual enrollment program not generated by policy, Early College for ME, targeted at high school seniors with college potential but no plans for college. An ECS highlight offers a profile of the program.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: For main dual enrollment program
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition The department of education pays 50% of the tuition for the first 3 credit hours taken each semester by a student at an eligible institution and up to 6 credit hours per academic year. The student is not required to pay any tuition, but must pay any fees associated with the college course he/she is taking.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. The Maine Maritime Academy may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Parental approval. Policy also states that if a student does not meet all approval criteria set in statute, the student may still participate in dual enrollment provided the student is at least in grade 11, has received a recommendation from the student's high school and has received approval from a postsecondary institution.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, the department of education pays 50% of the in-state tuition for the first 3 credit hours taken each semester by a student at an eligible institution and up to 6 credit hours per academic year.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: District may choose to award secondary credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources ME. REV. STAT. ANN. tit. 20-A, § 4771 through 4776

    Maryland
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. State allows high school students to be dually enrolled in a high school and an institution of higher education.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition A postsecondary institution may waive a student's tuition but is not required to. If tuition is not waived, students who demonstrate financial need may apply to the state to have their tuition covered by a grant.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Districts may award high school credit; postsecondary credit policy not specified.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. Students who are enrolled in high school at least half-time and are enrolled in an approved dual credit program are counted as a full-time student for funding purposes.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, with qualifications. Students who are enrolled in high school at least half-time and are enrolled in an approved dual credit program are counted as a full-time student for funding purposes. A college may not receive state funding for students younger than 16 years old enrolled in continuing education courses, unless otherwise permitted by state law.
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Statute mandates that the governor include in the state budget at least 80% of the amount provided for need-based programs, including this one, in the previous fiscal year's state budget. Nonpublic and homeschooled school students may participate.
    Sources MD. CODE ANN. EDUC. § 18-107, 18-1401, 18-14A-01 and -02; MD. REGS. CODE tit. 13B, § 07.01.02, 07.02.02, tit. 13A, § 03.02.05, 09.10.16, 02.06.03(A)(6)

    Massachusetts
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. The student's high school may pay for tuition, but is not required to.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Legislation directs the board of education, in consultation with the board of higher education, to establish criteria for admission.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Nonpublic school students may participate in dual enrollment programs.
    Sources MASS. GEN. LAWS. ANN. ch. 15A, § 39; 603 CMR 10.02

    Michigan
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs (no title for either program). One was established through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options Act (1996). The other was established through the Career and Technical Preparation Act (2000).
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition A school district is only responsible for paying the portion of a student's tuition that is equal to the pro rated amount of funding that the district receives from the state for the portion of the school day that the student attends the postsecondary course. The district can provide additional funding but is not required to. Any tuition costs that are not covered by the district are the responsibility of the student.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both programs: Both. Tribal colleges and independent nonprofit colleges and universities may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: The Michigan virtual high school is to "act as a broker for college level equivalent courses ... and dual enrollment courses from postsecondary education institutions." Virtual high school offerings must include dual enrollment opportunities.
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: For both programs
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: For both programs
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For both programs: Student must have passed all subject areas on the Michigan merit exam (MME). A student who has not taken the MME must have achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on a readiness assessment (PSAT, ACT PLAN or ACT), or, if hoping to participate in a career and technical preparation program, a qualifying score in mathematics and a qualifying score on a nationally or industry recognized job skills assessment test as determined by the superintendent of public instruction. Parents must provide written confirmation that they have received information and counseling about programs.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Both programs: Not set in state policy. However, students must be enrolled in at least one high school class. Students may enroll only in courses not offered in the student's school district, or that are offered by the district but are not available to the student due to a scheduling conflict.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Both programs: When a student enrolls in a postsecondary course, the student must designate whether the course is for high school or postsecondary credit, or both.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must annually provide information on postsecondary enrollment options and career and technical preparation enrollment options to all students in grade 8 and higher. In addition, districts must provide all high school students with information on postsecondary enrollment options, including enrollment eligibility; the institutions and types of courses that are eligible for participation; the decision making process for granting academic credits; an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the school district and of financial arrangements for eligible charges and for paying costs not paid for by the school district; eligibility for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district; an explanation that, if the student qualifies for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district, the school district will pay that support directly to the postsecondary institution (or career and technical preparation program) upon being billed by the postsecondary institution or career/technical program and that the student is not responsible for that payment but is responsible for payment of costs not paid for; available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the eligible student enrolls; the effect of enrolling in a course on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements; and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the eligible student and the student's parent.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Every intermediate school district must annually collect from each of its constituent school districts and report to the department:
  • The amount of money expended by the school district for tuition payments required by the postsecondary enrollment options act and the career and technical preparation act.
  • The number of eligible students enrolled in the district and the number of those students who enrolled in one or more postsecondary or career/technical courses and received payment of all or part of eligible charges, both in the aggregate and by grade level.
  • The percentage of the school district's enrollment represented by the eligible students and eligible students who participated on postsecondary enrollment options and the career and technical preparation program, both in the aggregate and by grade level.
  • The total number of postsecondary and career/technical courses for which the school district made payment
  • The number of those courses for which postsecondary credit was granted
  • The number of those courses for which high school credit was granted
  • The number of those courses that were not completed by the eligible student.


  • The department must annually submit to the house and senate fiscal agencies and the department of management and budget a summary annual report on the information received from intermediate school districts.

    In addition, if a district wants all of its schools to be accredited, it must report annually to the state board, including on the number and percentage of students in each high school who enrolled in one or more postsecondary courses the previous school year and two school years ago.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Once a student has enrolled in a postsecondary course, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Districts must provide all high school students with information on postsecondary enrollment options, including enrollment eligibility; the institutions and types of courses that are eligible for participation; the decision making process for granting academic credits; an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the school district and of financial arrangements for eligible charges and for paying costs not paid for by the school district; eligibility for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district; an explanation that, if the student qualifies for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district, the school district will pay that support directly to the postsecondary institution upon being billed by the postsecondary institution and that the student is not responsible for that payment but is responsible for payment of costs not paid for; available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a postsecondary course in which the eligible student enrolls; the effect of enrolling in a postsecondary course on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements; and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the eligible student and the student's parent.

    To the extent possible, districts must provide counseling services to an eligible students and the student's parent before the student enrolls in postsecondary courses to ensure that the student and parent are fully aware of the benefits, risks, and possible consequences of enrolling in a postsecondary course. The person providing the counseling must encourage the student and student's parent to also use available counseling services at the eligible postsecondary institutions before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate. A school district may provide such counseling in a group meeting if additional personalized counseling is also made available.

    Before enrolling in a course at a postsecondary institution, a student and the student's parent must file with the postsecondary institution a signed form stating that the student has received the aforementioned information and counseling, and that the student understands the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in the course. Upon request, the department must provide technical assistance to districts and postsecondary institutions in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.

    Fifth-year high school students, including students in an alternative education program, may enroll in postsecondary enrollment options or career and technical preparation program courses provided the student has not met all requirements to receive a high school diploma, and the student is not enrolled in more than two dual enrollment courses at a time or more than four dual enrollment courses during the school year.
    Sources MICH. COMP. LAWS § 380.1204a(g), 380.1278b, 380.1481, 388.511 through .524, 388.1698, 388.1901 through .1913, 388.1606(6)(4)(q), 388.1621b(3); MICH. ADMIN. CODE R. 388.153

    Minnesota
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options (the first state-level dual enrollment policy in the U.S.)
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition For a student who is earning high school and postsecondary credit or just high school credit, the state department of education pays the student's tuition. The state uses the following formula to reimburse colleges/universities: 88% of the product of the formula allowance minus $415, multiplied by 1.3 divided by 30 for schools on a semester calendar, and by 45 for schools on a quarter calendar
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private two- and four-year institutions and private nonprofit two-year trade and technical schools and accredited opportunities industrialization centers may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: In addition, any person under 21 eligible for the graduation incentives program may participate in postsecondary enrollment options.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — students may enroll full-time or part-time at postsecondary institutions. However, students may not enroll for more than two academic years.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Students designate at the time of enrollment whether a course will be applied toward secondary or postsecondary credit. A student enrolling in multiple courses may designate some for high school and some for postsecondary credit. However, a district must award credit to a student "enrolled in a course for postsecondary credit if secondary credit is requested by the pupil."
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal. Beginning in fiscal year 2011, districts only are eligible for aid if the concurrent enrollment courses offered by the district are accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnership, in the process of being accredited, or are shown by clear evidence to be of comparable standard to accredited courses.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Dual enrollment students are funded at a higher level
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. By March 1 of each year, districts must provide general information about the program to all students in grades 10 and 11.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy. However, effective with fiscal year 2011, districts may be reimbursed only for dual enrollment courses that are accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnership, in the process of being accredited, or are shown by clear evidence to be of comparable standard to accredited courses.

    In addition, legislation allows districts to use teacher professional development funds to pay for coursework and training leading to certification as a college in the schools or concurrent enrollment teacher. In order to receive a grant, the teacher must be enrolled in a program that includes coursework and training focused on teaching a core subject.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: However, the Board of Trustees of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota must, and private nonprofit and proprietary postsecondary institutions should, award postsecondary credit for any successfully completed courses in a program certified by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Tribal school, homeschool and private school students may also participate.

    To the extent possible, the school or district must provide counseling services to students and their parents before students enroll in dual enrollment courses, to ensure that the students and their parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The school or district must provide information on the program including who may enroll, what institutions and courses are eligible for participation, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by students and their parents. The person providing counseling must encourage students and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate.

    Statute specifies that a postsecondary institution may provide information about its programs to a secondary school or to a student or parent, but it may not advertise or otherwise recruit or solicit high school students to enroll in its programs on financial grounds. Once a student has been enrolled in a dual enrollment course, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Prior to enrolling in a course, the student and the student's parents must sign a form stating that they have received the counseling information and that they understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The department must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school or district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.

    The postsecondary institution must inform the student of the support services available at that institution. If the student has an individual education plan that provides general education support and accommodations, the postsecondary institution must provide the support services as described in the student's IEP and the postsecondary institution and the district must negotiate an agreement on the rate to be charged for the services. Nothing may prevent the student from enrolling while the agreement is being developed. If the parties cannot agree on the services, on application of either party, the commissioner must resolve the dispute in the same manner the commissioner fixes tuition rates under section 125A.11. The commissioner's decision is binding on both parties.

    A student in a high school 40 miles or more from the nearest eligible institution may ask the district to offer at least one accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit within the resident district. A student may enroll in a course offered for either secondary or postsecondary credit[.] A district must offer an accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit if one or more students requests such a course. The district may decide which course to offer, how to offer the course, and whether to offer one or more courses. The district must offer at least one such course in the next academic period and must continue to offer at least one accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit in later academic periods.
    Sources MINN. STAT. ANN. § 124D.09, 124D.091, 120B.14, 123B.09, 135A.101, 122A.61, 126C.05(1)(h), 135A.031(2)(B)(1)

    Mississippi
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has three programs (no title for any program). One allows partnerships between local districts and the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL). Another allows partnerships between local districts and the Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges (SBCJC). A third allows partnerships among local districts, the IHL and the SBCJC (repealed effective June 30, 2009). The programs are fairly similar — differences are noted where they exist.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: All state programs are voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition All programs: Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: All programs: Students must have completed at least 14 core high school credits (as defined in regulations) OR have earned at least a composite score of 30 on the ACT (or an equivalent score on the SAT) and met all other eligibility requirements.
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: All programs
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: All programs
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn All programs: No cap to number of postsecondary credits a student may earn, provided student earns a "B" average or higher on the first two dual credit courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component All programs: Yes. High school teachers must be approved by as an instructor by the collaborating postsecondary institution. A dual credit academic instructor must have, at a minimum, a master's degree with at least 18 graduate semester hours in the instructor's field of expertise. A dual credit career and technical education instructor must meet the requirements set forth by the state board for community and junior colleges in the qualifications manual for postsecondary career and technical personnel. University and community and junior college personnel have the sole authority in the selection of dual credit instructors.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics All programs: Home-schooled students may also participate.

    For partnerships among local districts, the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) and the Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges (SBCJC): The chief academic officers of the board of trustees of state institutions of higher learning and of the state board for community and junior colleges must collaboratively develop a template for individual community and junior colleges and institutions of higher learning for consistent implementation of the dual enrollment program throughout the state.
    Sources Partnerships between districts and the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-37; CMSR 36-000-107(3.0)
    Partnerships among local districts, the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning and the Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-15-38; CMSR 36-000-107
    Partnerships between districts and the state board for community and junior colleges: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-29-1; CMSR 36-000-107(3.0)
    All programs: MISS. CODE ANN. § 37-101-28

    Missouri
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. High schools may "offer postsecondary course options to high school students."
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition cost may be covered by the student's school district, but if the district does not cover the cost, tuition is the responsibility of the student or student's parent.

    Through the Missouri Fee Payment Program, students who score at the Proficient or Advanced level on the math, science or communication arts MAP (Missouri Assessment Program) exams can be reimbursed for tuition costs for a dual enrollment course. The course must be in the same subject area as the MAP assessment.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private colleges and universities may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, students must be enrolled in at least one course at their high school for the school to be included in attendance for state aid purposes.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. High school teachers teaching dual credit courses must meet the requirements for postsecondary faculty, as set by the higher learning commission. As such, they must have at least a master's degree that includes substantial study (usually a minimum of 18 semester hours) appropriate to the subject they are teaching. Both the high school and the postsecondary institution's chief academic officer must approve high school instructors teaching dual enrollment courses.

    As stated in the department of higher education's dual credit policy, "The responsibility for the orientation and evaluation of dual credit instructors rests with the college's academic departments, with guidance from the chief academic officer to ensure consistency across academic departments.

    "New dual credit instructors will participate in orientation activities provided by the college and/or academic department. Continuing dual credit instructors must participate in both the professional development and evaluation activities as those expected of adjunct faculty on the college campus. In order to assure comparability of the dual credit course with the corresponding experience on the college campus, college academic departments must provide instructors of dual credit courses with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty member to serve as a liaison. Dual credit instructors must be evaluated according to the college's evaluation policies for other part-time/adjunct faculty, with the recommendation for continuation being the responsibility of the campus academic department. Thus, the institution of higher education must provide on-site supervision and evaluation of the dual credit faculty. This process is best served when the instructional site is within a reasonable commuting distance from the institution of higher education."

    Additionally, "Dual credit courses offered in high schools must duplicate the identical course offerings delivered on campus to matriculated students. Courses must be approved for dual credit status, and the credit awarded must be deemed acceptable in transfer by the faculty of the appropriate academic department (unit) of the college. Elements of the dual credit course to be approved by the on-campus college faculty in the appropriate academic discipline include the syllabus, textbook(s), teaching methodology, and student assessment strategies. Course content and course requirements must be comparable to those utilized in the equivalent on-campus courses with the same titles. The chief academic officer of the postsecondary institution will also be responsible for involving full time faculty in the discipline in the selection and evaluation of all dual credit faculty. The on-campus college faculty must also ensure comparable standards of evaluation."

    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. "All institutions offering dual credit courses are required to report annually to the CBHE such things as the number of sections offered; the number of students enrolled (duplicated headcount) per high school; the total by class (year in high school); the number of high schools served by dual credit and the number of sections in each; the student credit-hour production (total for all dual credit and total per high school); the number of sections offered in mathematics, science, social sciences, and humanities; and summary data on the performance of dual credit students. ... Dual credit data will be submitted to the CBHE when the institution submits its annual Performance Indicators Report."
    Program evaluation component Partial: in the case of dual credit courses offered at high schools, department of higher education policy specifies, "The responsibility for the development of assessment and evaluation measures to assure quality and comparability of dual credit courses resides with the on-campus college faculty in the appropriate academic discipline."
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources MO. REV. STAT. § 167.223; MO. CODE REGS. ANN. tit. 5, § 50-200.050; Appendix E, Graduation Requirements for Students in Missouri's Public Schools, September 2002; Missouri Department of Higher Education Dual Credit Policy

    Montana
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Running Start and Class 8 Alternative License. Running Start allows high school students to take courses for dual credit or college credit at a postsecondary institution. This model has expanded in recent years and now describes only a portion of dual enrollment courses offered in the state. Class 8 Alternative License requires college faculty teaching dual credit courses at the high school, postsecondary institutuion or online to demonstrate qualifications to teach high school students in the endorsement area. Courses for college credit only do not require the Class 8 Alternative License.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Statute provides that tuition may be covered by the student's school district, but if the district does not cover the cost, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. In practice, responsibility for tuition varies by interlocal agreement. The most common practice is for the student to pay tuition which the college has discount the tuition by 50%.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Student must complete a running start application; the district must "determine whether the student has the skills needed to succeed in the proposed college coursework."
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Statute provides that the interlocal agreement must specify whether a student may earn both high school and college credit. In practice, courses may be for dual credit or college credit only.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. High school instructors teaching a college course for dual credit (or college credit-only) are considered adjunct faculty of the college and must use the college's syllabus.

    Postsecondary:
    An instructor of a dual credit course who does not have K-12 licensure in the course content area must acquire a Class 8 alternative license.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: Courses are accepted by other institutions on the same basis as courses not offered for dual credit.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources MONT. CODE ANN. § 20-3-324, 20-9-706, 20-9-311; Mary Sheehy Moe, Montana University System

    Nebraska
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Dual Credit and Concurrent Enrollment. Dual Credit students earn both high school and college credit. Concurrent Enrollment students earn college credit only. Students in both programs are counted in their high school's average daily attendance.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition If a student is enrolled in a course for high school credit only, the student cannot be charged tuition. However, if the student takes a course for college credit, he/she may be charged tuition.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Nonprofit private postsecondary educational institutions may also offer distance education dual enrollment courses.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Eligibility requirements are set by high schools and postsecondary institutions. However, the Nebraska dual enrollment standards state that "eligible students will typically" be in grades 11 and 12; meet course prerequisites; "be formally identified as high ability or gifted students by" the high school; have at least a 3.0 GPA; a minimum ACT score of 20, etc.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: Statute relating to student fees states that students receive high school credit and "may also choose to apply for postsecondary" credit. Distance learning statute defines a dual enrollment course as one in which the student earns both high school and postsecondary credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy. However, the Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, specify:
    (1) Instructors must hold a master's degree and "have the mutual support of the district and college/university participating in the dual enrollment program."
    (2) High school and postsecondary faculty must "receive appropriate orientation and training[.]"
    (3) "Collaboration between high school and postsecondary faculty is encouraged and faculty development is available where appropriate."
    (4) "High school and postsecondary faculty maintain contact throughout the program. In some instances, this contact is facilitated by technology."

    In addition, "Course outlines or syllabi (including at minimum a description of content, teaching strategies, performance measures, grading standards, resource materials, objectives/outcomes, and course calendar) utilized in the program meet district(s), state, and college/university standards."
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy. However, the Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, specify that: (1) The district(s) and postsecondary institution should annually review the program. (2) Program participants should be "tracked following graduation through postsecondary experiences when possible. Tracking elements may include district(s) data (e.g., class rank, GPA, ACT where available, AP exam where available and appropriate, and course outcomes and grade) and postsecondary data (e.g., GPA, major, number of hours completed, and enhancements, if appropriate to program)."
    Unique characteristics The Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, direct districts and institutions to "work together to ensure broad access to dual enrollment courses for all students, irrespective of the students’ financial resources. Postsecondary education institutions are encouraged to offer tuition remissions or find other means of support for eligible students qualifying for free or reduced lunches or otherwise demonstrating financial need.
    "School districts that receive state aid related in part to significant numbers of students challenged by poverty or English language limitations should consider using such aid or finding other means of support to fund the tuition expenses of eligible students who would not otherwise be able to enroll in dual enrollment courses."

    Department of education regulations governing nonpublic schools indicate that nonpublic high schools may offer up to 100 of the minimum required 200 instructional units "through contractual or cooperative arrangements with other schools, educational service units, and/or postsecondary institutions" as long as "the courses are taught by properly certificated teachers and are made available to all eligible students."
    Sources NEB. REV. STAT. § 79-1201.01, 79-2,126, 85-2103; NEB. ADMIN. CODE Title 92, Ch. 10 and 14; Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards in Chapter Five of the Comprehensive Statewide Plan for Postsecondary Education in Nebraska, Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education

    Nevada
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. Students in grades 11 and 12 who complete postsecondary courses must be allowed to apply the credit toward completion of high school graduation requirements.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Per the institutional president's approval, a reduced registration fee may be offered to students taking 100-level and remedial courses on the high school campus. If the president does not approve the discount or if the student chooses to take a different course, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.

    High school students may take a distance learning college course for $25/course if the fee is approved by the institution's president.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: Students in grades 9 and 10 who have not been identified as academically gifted or talented may enroll for zero credits in Community Services courses only.
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: Approval of institution officials
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. Juniors and seniors identified as Vocational Program completers may enroll in more than 6 credits per semester "based on written, articulated occupational program agreements with designated school districts."
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: Each district identifies the courses for which students may earn high school credit, but districts must allow some dual enrollment courses to count toward high school graduation requirements.
  • How state funds participating high schools Not defined
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Charter school students are expressly identified as being able to participate in dual enrollment programs. Homeschool students may enroll subject to case-by-case approvals by institution officials.
    Sources NEV. REV. STAT. ANN. § 389.160; Nevada System of Higher Education Handbook, Title 4, Chapter 16, Section 7 and handbook, Title 4, Chapter 17, Section 13

    New Hampshire
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • No
  • Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in New Hampshire, dual enrollment is offered on an institutional basis.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • No state policy
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition There is no formal dual enrollment policy, so tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • How state funds participating high schools Reduced funding for dual enrollment students
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Dual enrollment students are funded at a higher level
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources N.H. REV. STAT. ANN. § 189:1-d

    New Jersey
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. Districts and postsecondary institutions may create partnerships in which college courses are offered to high school students on postsecondary campuses and in high schools.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: Districts must "make reasonable efforts to increase the availability of college-level instruction for high school students[.]"
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition There is no direct reference in state policy to who pays tuition. However, procedures must ensure that inability to pay does not keep any academically eligible student from participating.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Nonpublic two- and four-year institutions may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Local boards determine student eligibility.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A school district receives full funding for a dual enrollment student who takes his/her courses on the high school campus. The school also receives full funding for a student who takes his/her courses on a college campus, as long as the student earns credits toward high school graduation.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Dual enrollment courses must be taught by college faculty with academic rank. "Adjunct faculty and members of the district staff who have a minimum of a master's degree may also" teach dual enrollment courses. In addition, local boards and colleges must ensure that courses offered to high school students are equivalent to those offered to regularly admitted college students.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources N.J. STAT. ANN. § 18A:61C-1 through 18A:61C-9; N.J. ADMIN. CODE tit. 6A, § 8-3.3

    New Mexico
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Dual Credit
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: All districts must offer a program of courses for dual-credit in cooperation with a postsecondary institution, effective with the 2008-2009 school year.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition The higher education institution is required to waive tuition for students in dual enrollment programs. The student's high school is responsible for the cost of the required textbooks and supplies.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Courses may be provided at "off-campus centers"
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Student must obtain permission from a postsecondary institution representative
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Parental permission. Student must also be enrolled one-half or more of the minimum course requirements approved by the public education department for public school students (enrolled at least half-time in high school courses).
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: The agreement between the district and postsecondary partner must specify any student eligibility requirements.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No. A high school student may enroll in as many colleges courses as he/she wishes during a fall, spring or summer semester, provided the student's schedule is at least half comprised of public education department (PED)-approved high school courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must ensure that students are "reasonably informed about" curricular options, including dual credit courses. Each student's "next-step plan" developed in grade 8 must include Advanced Placement, honors, dual credit or distance learning courses. Districts must provide information and orientation to students about opportunities to participate in dual credit programs during student advisement, academic support and formulation of annual next step plans.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. The postsecondary partner must approve faculty for all dual credit courses. Each district offering dual credit courses must submit a signed uniform master agreement with a public postsecondary institution to the public education department. The agreement must specify eligible courses, academic quality of dual credit courses, course approval and course requirements.

    College courses eligible for dual credit must meet the rigor for postsecondary institution credit and be congruent with the postsecondary institution's academic standards. Dual credit courses offered at high schools must conform to college academic standards. Course requirements for high school students enrolled in dual credit courses must be equal to those of regular college students.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Districts must annually report to the public education department and postsecondary institutions must report to the higher education department (1) the number of students enrolled in dual credit classes, (2) the courses taken and (3) grades earned by each dual credit student.

    The public education department must annually report to the legislature high school graduation rates for dual credit students. The higher education department must report to the legislature on the New Mexico postsecondary institutions dual credit students ultimately attend. The higher education department and the public education department must annually report to the legislature the estimated cost of providing the statewide dual credit program, including tuition, fees, textbooks and course supplies.
    Program evaluation component Yes. The higher education department and the public education department must evaluate the dual credit program in terms of its accessibility to students statewide and its effect on:
  • Student achievement in secondary education
  • Student enrollment and completion of higher education
  • School districts, charter schools, state-supported schools and public postsecondary educational institutions.
  • Unique characteristics Private school, homeschool and tribal school students may participate in dual credit courses, provided they pay the full cost of the college courses.

    Postsecondary and district partners in dual credit agreements must collaborate to provide information and orientation to the student and parent on the responsibilities of dual credit enrollment, including academic rigor, time commitments, and behavioral expectations associated with taking college courses and the importance of satisfactorily completing the postsecondary institution credits attempted in order for dual credit to be awarded. Postsecondary and district partners must also inform students of course requirement information, including course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements, performance standards, and other related course information.

    District partners must provide appropriate accommodations and services for special education students while the students are enrolled in dual credit classes, including academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services for eligible students across educational activities and settings (e.g. equipping school computers with screen-reading, voice recognition or other adaptive hardware or software and providing note-takers, recording devices, or sign language interpreters, or other adaptation as required by law). Districts must also inform students in need of accommodations or other arrangements of the need to speak directly with the disabilities coordinator at the postsecondary institution.

    High school students must be allowed use of the postsecondary institution library, course-related labs and other instructional facilities, use of the postsecondary institution programs and services such as counseling, tutoring, advising, and special services for the students with disabilities, and access to postsecondary institution personnel and resources as required.
    Sources N.M. STAT. ANN. § 21-1-1.2, 21-1B-3, 21-13-19, 22-13-1.1, 22-13-1.4, 22-8-25(D)(1); N.M. ADMIN. CODE tit. 5, § 55.4, tit. 6, § 30.7

    New York
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • No
  • Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in New York, dual enrollment is offered on an institutional basis.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • No state policy
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition There is no formal dual enrollment policy, so tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. If dual enrollment students attend their high school full-time, they are funded at the same level as traditional students. However, if they are absent during the school day to attend dual enrollment classes, they may be counted as part-time students.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources N.Y. COMP. CODES R. & REGS. tit. 8, § 4-1.4(c)(1)(ii), 52.2(c)(3), 52.2(a)(3), 100.2,

    North Carolina
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: "Huskins Bill" and Concurrent Enrollment. The Huskins Bill program provides that an agreement between a district and community college will allow students in grades 9-12 to enroll in college courses for college credit. Concurrent Enrollment allows a high school student who is at least 16 years old to enroll in community college courses for college credit.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Community colleges must waive tuition for all high school students participating in Huskins and Concurrent Enrollment.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: For Huskins, although exceptions exist
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For Concurrent Enrollment, although exceptions exist
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: Concurrent Enrollment: Student must be at least age 16
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: Huskins: The high school's chief administrative officer must recommend the student. Concurrent Enrollment: Upon approval of the president of the college, and upon approval of the student's program by the chief administrative school officer and the president of the college.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Concurrent Enrollment: The chief administrative school officer must affirm that the student is taking the equivalent of one-half of a full-time schedule and is making progress toward graduation.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. Concurrent Enrollment: However, a student must be taking at least half of a full-time schedule at his/her high school.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: Huskins and Concurrent Enrollment: Districts may award credit but are not required to do so
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Huskins: Students must meet the same prerequisite, co-requisite and course admission requirements as regular college students. Courses must be of the same rigor as courses for traditional students, using the same college-level textbooks and covering the same course material.

    Huskins courses appear to be typically offered at high schools by community college faculty, and most Concurrent Enrollment courses are offered at community colleges by community college faculty.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: While a student must receive credit for all courses included in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) completed with a "C" or better, some courses taken by high school students are not included in the CAA.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Yes, for Huskins. The agreement between the district and community college, which must be developed and approved on at least an annual basis, must define the process for "planning and conducting an annual evaluation (to be maintained at the college)".
    Unique characteristics Huskins Bill and Concurrent Enrollment students may not displace adults but may be admitted any term on a space-available basis to any curriculum course 100 level and above or any continuing education course. Once admitted, they must be treated the same as all other students.

    Huskins: Homeschool students may participate. However, homeschools must participate via their local school administrative unit.

    Special needs students must meet the disability eligibility standards for the college. The college must determine with the school or district "what accommodations are needed, while maintaining the integrity of the course, to provide the student proper access to the course. The college and LSAU[district]/school will collaborate to determine who will provide necessary services."
    Sources N.C. GEN. STAT. § 115D-5(b), 115D-20(4); N.C. ADMIN. CODE tit. 16, r. 6D.0503(e)(5), tit. 23, r. 2C.0305(c) through (e), 02D.0326; North Carolina Community College System's Curriculum Procedures Reference Manual, Section 14, "Operating Procedures for the Enrollment of High School Students in Community College Courses," revised May 16, 2008; School Attendance & Student Accounting Manual 2008-2009

    North Dakota
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Courses may be offered by any postsecondary institution accredited by a regional accrediting organization; career/technical courses may be offered by a postsecondary institution in a program accredited by a national or regional accrediting organization recognized by the United States department of education.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Parent permission
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary campuses may publish guidelines that describe criteria for student eligibility.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, an institution may limit the number of courses a student may complete during any given academic term or time period.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. According to North Dakota University System (NDUS) procedures, "The college course section taught in the high school must meet the content and academic standards of the NDUS course sections taught on campus. ... To ensure that college course standards are adhered to, the NDUS college/university course syllabus will be provided to the [high school] instructor and be used as the criteria and model for all such dual-credit college courses taught in the high school. In most cases, this will mean the use of the same (or equivalent) text materials and similar evaluation criteria to include institutional exams if need be." The postsecondary institution must monitor the course, including by "using the sponsoring college/university student evaluation document and procedure in order to solicit student feed-back."

    See also the "Instructor Approval" portion of the North Dakota University System Procedures 402.3.2, Delivery of Dual-Credit College Courses.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: "All dual-credit courses will have equal transferability status within the NDUS [North Dakota University System] in accordance with the General Education Requirement Transfer Agreement (GERTA) and other transfer agreements."
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics "Generally, dual-credit courses will be offered at participating high schools within the host institution's primary geographic service region or in the case of UND and NDSU that have state-wide missions, in those counties immediately adjacent to the host institution."
    Sources N.D. CENT. CODE § 15.1-25-01 through -06; North Dakota State Board of Higher Education Policies, section 403.5 and 402.3; North Dakota University System Procedure 402.3.2

    Ohio
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program. High school students are allowed to take college courses for credit either at a high school or on a college campus. Also includes the Seniors to Sophomores program, which allows high school seniors to enroll full-time at a University System of Ohio campus their last year of high school.

    In addition, 2005 H.B. 115 authorized 16 regions to receive grant funding and establish dual credit programs targeting courses in mathematics, science and foreign language. However, because this is not a statewide program, it is not referenced elsewhere in this database.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: For Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. Forty-nine districts are offering dual enrollment on the high school campus.
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: For Seniors to Sophomores. Forty-nine schools and their postsecondary partners are piloting the program, effective fall 2008.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent under Option A. Under Option B, the school pays for the tuition through a deduction in their basic aid payment. The choice to select option A or option B is the student's.

    Seniors to Sophomores: Tuition arrangements are negotiated between the school district and the college or university partner. Students take a year’s worth of college credit at no charge to the student.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Private and for-profit two- and four-year institutions may also participate. Seniors to Sophomores: The district must have a University System of Ohio (USO) partner. If the district has a USO partner, it can also have private college and university partners, but it is not permitted to have only private college or university partners.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: For Seniors to Sophomores, provided online courses are available to regular college students
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: For Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Students may not enroll in a college course if the student has taken high school courses in the same subject area as that college course and has failed to attain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, or the equivalent, in such completed high school courses. For Seniors to Sophomores: Students must have earned at least a "C" in Algebra II and completed at least three years of high school English with at least a "C" average (also listed under "Other")
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Notes/Citation: For Post-Secondary Enrollment Options
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For Seniors to Sophomores: Students must score college ready on the college partner's placement assessment as defined by the college.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For Seniors to Sophomores: Students must pass all parts of the Ohio Graduation Test, complete Algebra II or the equivalent with a "C" or better, and complete three years of high school English with a "C" or better.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Institutions may set their own eligibility requirements.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. However, a student first enrolling in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options in grade 9 may not take more than the equivalent of four years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 10 may not take more than the equivalent of three years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.

    For Seniors to Sophomores: Student must enroll full-time on a University System of Ohio Campus.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For Seniors to Sophomores
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: A student may elect to earn only high school credit, only postsecondary credit, or postsecondary and high school credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Reduced funding for dual enrollment students if the school pays for the tuition through a deduction in their basic aid payment. Equal funding if student or student's parent pays tuition.

    Seniors to Sophomores: Participating high schools receive a grant of up to $100,000 and receive funds for participating students through existing mechanisms. During the grant period, school districts are asked to develop sustainable funding models.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. All public and charter school students (and students in participating nonpublic schools) in grades 8-11 must be annually notified about Post-Secondary Enrollment Options.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Any high school student admitted to a course by an institution of higher education will be expected and required to perform at the same level as the institution's regular students.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. The department of education collects and reports student Post-Secondary Enrollment Options participation levels in terms of public students by district, nonpublic students by school, and public and nonpublic students by postsecondary institution. As of September 2008, information was posted for fiscal year 2001 through fiscal year 2007.

    As of September 2008, the department has not yet determined the reporting mechanism for Seniors to Sophomores. Districts will submit a mid-year report and a final report to the Board of Regents.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Students in grades 8-11 and their parents must receive counseling before participating in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options, to ensure that students and parents are fully aware of the possible risks and consequences of participation. Counseling information must include:
  • Program eligibility
  • The process for granting academic credits
  • Financial arrangements for tuition, books, materials and fees
  • Criteria for any transportation aid
  • Available support services
  • Scheduling
  • The consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls and the effect of the grade attained in the course being included in the student's grade point average
  • The effect of program participation on the student's ability to complete the district's or school's graduation requirements
  • The academic and social responsibilities of students and parents under the program
  • Information about and encouragement to use the counseling services of the college in which the student intends to enroll.

    The student and student's parent must sign a form indicating they have received the counseling information and that they understand the responsibilities they must assume in the program.


  • A college must give priority to its other students regarding enrollment in courses. However, once a student has been accepted in a course as a participant, the institution may not displace the participant for another student.

    Nonpublic school students may also participate in Postsecondary Enrollment Options. Participating nonpublic schools must annually provide all students in grades 8-11 with information about Postsecondary Enrollment Options before the first day of March. The chief administrator of any nonpublic school notifying the department of education that students of the school will participate in the program must provide counseling to students in grades 8-11 and their parents before the students participate in the program to ensure that students and parents are fully aware of the possible risks and consequences of participation. Such counseling must include explaining the fact that funding may be limited and that not all students who wish to participate may be able to do so.
    Sources OHIO REV. CODE ANN. § 3365.01 through .11 and .15, 3313.6013; OHIO ADMIN. CODE § 3301-44; University System of Ohio Seniors to Sophomores Web page; Sarah Luchs, Ohio Department of Education

    Oklahoma
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Higher education institutions must waive tuition costs, of up to 6 credit hours a semester, for high school seniors. For all other students: If a school district offers a course that the student is taking at a community college, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. If the school does not offer the course, the district must pay the cost of tuition, fees, books and transportation.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: Students not required to meet GPA requirements to enter concurrent enrollment, but must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA in college courses to continue participation.
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Students may only enroll in subjects where they have met the ACT assessment requirements for college placement as determined by the state regents. A high school student not meeting the designated score in science reasoning, mathematics, and English will not be permitted enrollment in the corresponding college subject area. A student scoring below the established ACT score in reading is not permitted enrollment in any other college course outside the subjects of science, math and English.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Parental permission. In addition, University of Oklahoma (OU) and Oklahoma State University (OSU) are authorized to set higher admission standards for 12th grade students. OU is authorized to require minimum class rank or grade point average in addition to ACT or SAT score.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No absolute number of postsecondary credits — either per semester or during a student's high school career — but the total number of high school and college courses a student is taking in a given semester may not equal more than 19 semester credit hours. For purposes of this calculation, one semester high school course is equivalent to three postsecondary credit hours. However, students wishing to go beyond this limit may petition the institution.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. The state board and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are required to prepare promotional materials explaining the requirements, features and opportunities of concurrent enrollment and ensure that districts distribute the materials to each student prior to enrollment for each year of high school.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Students' opportunity to earn college credit through concurrent enrollment is contingent upon several course quality factors, including "qualifications of the personnel delivering the course[.]" To earn college credit, students must be in a course with college students enrolled, or at an off-campus site "and taught by regular faculty whose primary educational employment is as a faculty member at the institution delivering the course. The chancellor may make exceptions to this rule.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Homeschool students and students from unaccredited high schools may concurrently enroll if they are at least 16 and meet the ACT/SAT score threshold (ACT/SAT threshold for 16-year-old students from homeschools or unaccredited high schools are substantially higher than those for 17-year-old students from homeschools or unaccredited high schools). The University of Oklahoma (OU) and Oklahoma State University may set higher admission requirements for such students age 17 or older. OU is authorized to require a minimum class rank or grade point average in addition to the ACT/SAT score.

    In addition, colleges "should provide appropriate academic advising prior to and continuing throughout the student's enrollment."
    Sources OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 628.13, 11-103.6(4); OKLA. ADMIN. CODE § 210:10-1-5(i); Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Policy Manual, Section 3.10.6(I) (starting page 100 of 212) and 4.1.3(F)

    Oregon
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Expanded Options Program
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition The school district is primarily responsible for paying tuition. The district must enter into a financial agreement with the postsecondary institution about the cost that will be paid per student. The amount the district pays must be at least equal to 50% of district's general purpose grant per extended ADMw.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both, plus the Oregon Health and Science University
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: Students who are not in grade 11 or 12 but who either (1) are at least 16 years old or (2) have developed an educational learning plan as defined in statute and who have not completed the requirements for a high school diploma are eligible to participate.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Student must apply for acceptance at the postsecondary institution
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.

    In addition, the number of quarter credit hours that may be awarded by a high school under the Expanded Options Program is limited 330 hours for high schools serving 1,000 students, or to an amount equal to the number of students in grades 9 through 12 enrolled in the high school multiplied by a factor of 0.33. For example, the cap for a high school with 450 students in grades 9 through 12 would be 148.5 (450 X 0.33 = 148.5). A district may choose to exceed these caps. If a district decides not to exceed the credit hour caps and has more students wishing to participate than are allowed under the credit hour cap, the district board must establish a process for selecting eligible students to participate in the program. A district must give priority for program participation to at-risk students.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must annually provide information on the Expanded Options program to all high school students. In addition, districts must establish a process to identify students who have dropped out and make it a priority to provide these dropouts with information about the Expanded Options Program. Districts must send information about the program to the last known address of the student's family.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Before developing programs with high schools, a community college must file with the department of community colleges and workforce development a policy for governing Two Plus Two and dual credit programs. Policies must include requirements for instructors equivalent to that of other college instructors in the discipline, including master's degree for instructors of lower division college courses, and an appropriate combination of education and experience for instructors of professional technical courses.

    In addition, participating school districts and postsecondary institutions must develop written agreements regarding Two Plus Two and Dual Credit programs, which must include criteria on approval of courses, selection and approval of instructors, procedures, counseling, monitoring, and evaluation. Participating school districts and postsecondary institutions must, in consultation with appropriate staff members, determine that course content and instructional quality are consistent with that offered by the community colleges.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Each district must annually report to the department of education on most of the indicators listed below. The department of education must annually report on the Expanded Options Program to the joint boards of education and the house and senate education committees. The report must include:
  • The types of accelerated college credit programs offered.
  • The number of waivers of requirements granted under the Expanded Options Program and the reasons for issuance of the waivers.
  • The number of college and high school credits earned under the Expanded Options Program.
  • The estimated college tuition cost savings for students participating in the Expanded Options Program.
  • The number of students who had dropped out of high school but returned to high school to participate in the Expanded Options Program and earned a diploma.
  • The number of students who participated in the Expanded Options Program, disaggregated by race/ethnicity and income level.
  • The number of talented and gifted students who participated in the Expanded Options Program.
  • The level of participation in the Expanded Options Program by rural communities, and the number of students living in rural communities who participated in the program.
  • The number of appeals of students under ORS 340.030 to the superintendent of public instruction or the superintendent's designee and the disposition of the students' appeals.
  • The number of small school districts with more eligible students who wish to participate in the program than are allowed under the credit hour caps established in ORS 340.080.
  • Program evaluation component Yes. The department of education's annual report to the joint boards and the house and senate education committees on Expanded Options participation must include recommendations for changes to the Expanded Options Program to better serve students, including changes to the age limit restrictions for eligible students, and recommendations for funding changes to better serve students who wish to participate in the program.
    Unique characteristics Districts must establish a process to identify students who have dropped out and make it a priority to provide these dropouts with information about the Expanded Options Program. Districts must send information about the program to the last known address of the student's family.

    Annual notification about the Expanded Options Program must include information about:
  • Financial arrangements for tuition, textbooks, equipment and materials
  • Available transportation services
  • The effect of enrolling in the Expanded Options Program on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements
  • The consequences of failing or not completing an eligible postsecondary course
  • The requirement that participation in the Expanded Options Program is contingent on acceptance by an eligible post-secondary institution
  • School district timelines affecting student eligibility and duplicate course determinations.

  • The district of a student who wishes to participate in the Expanded Options Program must review with the student and the student's parent the student's current status toward meeting all state and school district graduation requirements and the applicability of the proposed eligible postsecondary course with respect to fulfilling the student's remaining graduation requirements. An eligible student who intends to participate in the Expanded Options Program must develop an educational learning plan in cooperation with an advisory support team. The plan may include the student's short-term and long-term learning goals and proposed activities, and the relationship of the eligible postsecondary courses proposed under the Expanded Options Program and the student's learning goals. An advisory support team may include the student, the student's parent and a teacher or a counselor. If a postsecondary institution accepts a student for participation in Expanded Options, the institution must provide academic advising to the student as appropriate.

    Legislation specifies that the student's resident district must provide any required special education services to a student participating in the Expanded Options program. A participating postsecondary institution that intends to provide special education services to a student in the Expanded Options program must enter into a contract with the student's resident district; this contract must include components set forth in statute.

    Legislation authorizes a district to seek a department waiver from the Expanded Options Program requirements. The department must grant the waiver if compliance with statutory requirements would adversely impact the finances of the school district, or if offers dual credit technical preparation programs, such as two-plus-two programs, advanced placement or International Baccalaureate programs and other accelerated college credit programs. There is no limit to the number of times a district may be granted a waiver.

    A public school may participate in the Expanded Options Program by amending its charter.
    Sources OR. REV. STAT. § 340.005 through .090, 341.525; OR. ADMIN. R. 581-022-1360 through -1372, 589-007-0200 (= poss. only refers to 2+2)

    Pennsylvania
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Schools may choose to pay a student’s postsecondary tuition and fees. If the school does not pay, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. Students may qualify for a complete or partial reimbursement through the state’s "Opportunities for Educational Excellence Program."
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private two- and four-year institutions, and private licensed schools may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary placement test scores, plus demonstrated readiness for college-ready coursework, as determined by the postsecondary institution.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Results of nationally available achievement tests or other standardized tests used in the district's assessment system, plus satisfactory progress toward meeting high school graduation requirements, as determined by the student's district.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes — no more than 24 postsecondary credits in any school year.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A district receives full state funding for a student if the district pays the student’s tuition and fees at the postsecondary institution. If the district does not pay the student’s tuition and fees, the district receives a prorated amount of state funding based on the amount of time that the student spent in the classroom.
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. Public school students/parents are not required to be notified, but written notice must be provided to nonpublic/private schools for which the district provides transportation, charter schools operating within the district and the parents of homeschool students.

    Statute also directs the department of education to publish promotional materials on its Web site that districts or area vocational-technical schools may use to inform students and parents about the requirements, features and opportunities of concurrent enrollment programs.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Postseconary institutions may contract with district employees to teach concurrent enrollment courses if employees meet all qualifications for an adjunct faculty member at the postsecondary institution. A district or area vocational-technical school may not reduce its complement of professional or paraprofessional employees to support a concurrent enrollment program.

    Concurrent enrollment programs seeking a state grant must submit a concurrent enrollment agreement to the department of education. The agreement must indicate that courses are identical to those offered when concurrent enrollment are not enrolled, including an identical curriculum, assessments and instructional materials. Courses must enforce the same prerequisite coursework requirements as identical non-concurrent enrollment courses.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: The postsecondary institution at which a student successfully completed a concurrent course must award postsecondary credit. Any other postsecondary institution may but is not required to award postsecondary credit.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Districts and area vocational-technical schools that receive a concurrent enrollment grant must submit an annual report to the department. The report must indicate:
  • The eligible postsecondary institution(s) partnering in the program.
  • The number of concurrent students participating.
  • The approved courses offered through the program.
  • The total approved cost for each concurrent course.
  • The total amount of grant funds received.
  • The number of concurrent students who are enrolled in charter, nonpublic, private or home school programs.


  • Using information provided by districts and area vocational-technical schools, the department must develop an annual report, to be submitted to the chairs and minority chairs of the house and senate appropriations and education committees.
    Program evaluation component Yes. To be eligible to receive a concurrent enrollment grant, a district or area vocational-technical school must form a concurrent enrollment committee composed of specified district and postsecondary stakeholders. Each concurrent enrollment committee must, among other duties, meet at least quarterly to review the concurrent enrollment program and recommend any changes to the local board.
    Unique characteristics Students in charter, nonpublic/private or homeschool programs may participate in concurrent enrollment programs. Printed promotional materials that the department of education provides school districts and area vocational-technical schools for dissemination must be made available, on request, to any charter, nonpublic/private or home education program. The total amount of state grant funds to support charter, nonpublic/private, or homeschool programs must equal up to 6% of the total amount of funds appropriated.

    Upon local request, the department must provide technical assistance to a district or area vocational-technical school in developing a concurrent enrollment program.

    For a district or area vocational-technical school to receive a concurrent enrollment grant, a concurrent enrollment committee must be formed. Four members must include a parent of a high school student, a teacher, an administrator, and the chair of the local board. At least two members must be appointed by the postsecondary institution. The concurrent enrollment committee must develop a concurrent enrollment agreement to submit for state approval, present the agreement to the local board for approval, meet at least quarterly to review the program, recommend any changes to the local board, and develop criteria for students who do not meet certain enrollment criteria to participate in the program.
    Sources PA. STAT. ANN. tit. 24, § 16-1602-B through -1615-B, 16-1611-B; PA. STAT. ANN. tit. 22, § 11.5, 35.61

    Rhode Island
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: However, in the fall of 2007, the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education developed a series of dual enrollment initiatives to focus on the state’s underserved students. A statewide dual enrollment coordinator was hired to oversee these initiatives which include a focus on informed practice, procedure, policy, and implementation as well as a statewide campaign to highlight dual enrollment opportunities across the state’s public and private institutions. The Governor’s PK-16 Council established a Dual Enrollment Subcommittee in the fall of 2007 and charged the subcommittee with developing policy, procedure and implementation plans for statewide dual enrollment initiatives that would target all students, in particular those who were underserved. The Dual Enrollment Subcommittee is developing a memorandum of understanding between the state’s higher education and K-12 commissioners to serve as a guarantee that high school students who enroll and complete a pre-approved college course will also earn credit towards high school completion. A procedure manual is being developed to streamline the documentation of dual enrollment paperwork. Additionally, policy is being crafted to address the issues of developing a statewide dual enrollment agenda. In order to develop informed practices for dual enrollment, the Rhode Island Office of Higher Education is sponsoring a statewide pilot with support from the Nellie Mae Education Foundation. The pilot is allowing the state to test a model for dual enrollment that reaches out to students from a low-income, predominantly minority, urban high school in Providence and provides college skills training and academic support as well as 15 transcripted credits. Additionally, five mini-pilots were developed from the larger statewide pilot to test the success of programs ranging from scholarship support for single dual enrollment courses, a partnership between the Community College of Rhode Island and The Met High School to develop an early high school pipeline, a partnership between the University of Rhode Island and Central Falls High School to provide students a "taste" of college coupled with academic support systems, and a three-credit college success course offered to students across the state.
  • Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in Rhode Island, dual enrollment opportunities are being provided through locally and privately funded initiatives.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • No state policy
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: However, Dual Enrollment Subcommittee of the Governor’s PK-16 Council is developing a memorandum of understanding between the state’s higher education and K-12 commissioners to serve as a guarantee that high school students who enroll and complete a pre-approved college course will also earn credit towards high school completion.
  • How state funds participating high schools Not defined
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Legislation directs the department of elementary and secondary education to develop targeted dropout prevention interventions "or identify appropriate existing methods for school districts" in which the dropout rate, as calculated by the department, exceeds 15%. These interventions may include "[a]lternative programs designed to reengage dropouts including dual enrollment courses at the community college level" and offering full course fee waivers for free- and reduced-lunch students enrolled in dual credit courses.
    Sources R.I. GEN. LAWS § 16-67.1-2; Jessica Geier, Rhode Island Office of Higher Education

    South Carolina
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Unknown
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Minimum GPA
  • Notes/Citation: Only for courses offered by four-year institutions and two-year regional campuses of the University of South Carolina (not applicable to courses sections in technical colleges).
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Only for technical colleges: students must "meet the same requirements for individual courses as other college students"
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. "The number of college-level courses completed in these dual enrollment offerings will vary according to the student's ability and work ethic."
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Not defined
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. "Dual enrollment course sections must be comparable in academic content and expected outcome, syllabus, texbook(s), teaching methodologies, and assessment strategies to the particular course offerings delivered elsewhere by the providing higher education institution. Courses must be approved for dual enrollment status by the institution's chief academic officer, or his/her designee."

    Each providing college/university's chief academic officer (or designee) is "responsible for selecting and evaluating all dual-enrollment faculty, using Southern Association of Colleges and Schools college-level criteria as minimal requirements for teaching these sections."

    In addition, the chief academic officer "must ensure standards of ... faculty evaluation in the dual enrollment course selections comparable to those required of other sections of the same courses."

    "Dual enrollment instructors must participate in the expected, relevant professional development and evaluation activities of the offering institution of higher education. For purposes of assuring comparability of dual enrollment offerings with other institutional offerings, academic departments must provide" dual enrollment instructors "with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty liaison."

    "The higher education institution must demonstrate clear control of each dual enrollment course, to include control of the faculty either through a direct employment contract or through a statement signed by the faculty agreeing to comply with all college course requirements. ... The chief academic officer of the institution of higher education offering the course is responsible for the review of student performance prior to the continuation fo the course and the instructor in subsequent semesters."

    "Whether the course is offered by traditional means or by distance learning technology, the providing higher education institution must provide evaluation and supervision of dual enrollment faculty members in the high schools. Traditionally-delivered dual enrollment coursework should only be offered within reasonable commuting distance of the offering institution to facilitate on-site evaluation and supervision."
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: To be transferable to other public postsecondary institutions in the state: General education courses must be chosen from the List of Transferable Courses in the Statewide Transfer and Articulation Policy. For technical education courses, the student must enroll in a technical college that allows such a course to be counted toward an associate's degree, diploma or certificate.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Each institution must "develop an annual report on dual enrollment offerings that demonstrates compliance with" state guidelines "for each dual enrollment course offered to high school students." The commission on higher education must in turn publish an annual report on dual enrollment offerings by South Carolina public postsecondary institutions.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Institutions must "cooperate with each other in providing dual enrollment courses in a particular geographic area." Policy also specifies, "Students enrolled in dual enrollment courses must be guaranteed convenient geograhic and electronic access to student and academic support comparable to what is accorded on-campus students, including access to library resources. Students in dual enrollment courses also must have reasonable access to the course instructor outside regular classroom hours either in person, via phone, or electronically."

    "For purposes of assuring comparability of dual enrollment offerings with other institutional offerings, academic departments must provide" dual enrollment instructors "with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty liaison."
    Sources S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-59-210; Fall 2004 Statewide Higher Education Policy for Delivery and Transferability of "Dual Enrollment" Coursework Offered in High Schools

    South Dakota
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title. A high school student may enroll in an institution of higher education or postsecondary vocational education institution.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition District may cover all or a portion of tuition and fees; the student is responsible for paying any tuition/fees not paid by the district and any other costs.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: One university has sole responsibility for offering dual credit classes in high schools, so as to ensure that student outcomes are at the college level.
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12
  • Notes/Citation: For distance learning courses and courses taught by postsecondary faculty
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: For courses taught by high school teachers through an agreement between the board of regents and a postsecondary institution
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No, although policies do establish limits to the number of hours that will apply toward a specific degree program. In addition, if a student fails a postsecondary course, the student is not eligible to enroll in additional courses through the dual enrollment program.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Faculty from only one university are authorized to teach dual enrollment courses in high schools, to ensure that content meets college-level expectations.

    Apart from courses taught by this university's faculty, dual enrollment courses taught at the high school will not be awarded transfer or equivalent postsecondary credit unless the credit is granted by a university with which the board of regents has a dual credit agreement. The agreement between the board of regents and college requires:
  • High school faculty to have either a master's degree in the subject/discipline teaching, or a master's degree with 18 graduate hours in the subject/discipline teaching
  • A faculty member from the credit-granting institution be assigned to and actively engaged as a mentor for the high school instructor
  • The faculty of the institution granting credit developed the course syllabus.
  • Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: Postsecondary institutions must award credit only if the credit is granted by a university with which the board of regents has a dual credit agreement. The institutions/systems with which agreements have been signed are available at this site: http://www.sdbor.edu/administration/academics/Articulation.htm The agreements set forth best practices to ensure that the level of course content is equal to that of traditional postsecondary courses.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources S.D. CODIFIED LAWS § 13-28-37, 13-53-43; South Dakota Board of Regents policy manual 2:5(3)(F)(1) Sam Gingerich, Chief Academic Officer, South Dakota Board of Regents

    Tennessee
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Dual Enrollment and Joint Enrollment. Dual enrollment is an arrangement between a high school and a postsecondary institution that allows a student to enroll in postsecondary classes for high school and college credit. Joint enrollment allows a student to receive only high school or postsecondary credit.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Not specified
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition A student in a dual enrollment program, including a distance education course, is eligible to apply for a "dual enrollment grant" from lottery proceeds. To maintain eligibility after the first semester of receipt, the student must maintain a minimum 2.75 grade point average for all postsecondary courses attempted through the grant. The grant will pay only for lower division (100-200/1000-2000), not upper division (300-400/3000-4000) courses.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For students in "dual enrollment" program. "Joint enrollment" students receive either high school or postsecondary credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Not defined
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics One of the eligibility criteria for a General Assembly Merit Scholarship is that while in high school, a student enrolled in at least four courses (12 semester hours) at an eligible postsecondary institution.

    During the 2008-2009 school year, a one-year pilot program funded by lottery proceeds is providing laptops to students in dual enrollment courses that require a computer (either online courses or courses in which a computer is a necessary piece of equipment). One hundred students in each grand division of the state will receive a laptop. The higher education commission, in consultation with the department of education, must provide an evaluation of the pilot to the house and senate education committees by September 2009.
    Sources TENN. CODE ANN. § 49-4-902, 49-4-916(b)(3), 49-4-930, 49-6-3111; TENN. COMP. R. & REGS. 0520-1-3-.06, 1640-1-19-.01, 1640-1-19-.14

    Texas
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Dual Credit
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Higher education institutions may waive tuition charges. If the institution does not provide a waiver, tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: Courses offered electronically must comply with the higher education coordinating board's adopted "Principles of Good Practice for Courses Offered Electronically."
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: Students must earn minimum scores on any of several college placement tests, including COMPASS and ACCUPLACER, or earn minimum scores on the English or math section of the 11th grade Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). An 11th grade student may alternatively qualify by earning a minimum score on the English language arts/reading or math portions of the 10th grade TAKS, PSAT or PLAN. Students who qualify using the PSAT or PLAN must demonstrate eligibility again in 12th grade.
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: A student may enroll in workforce education dual enrollment courses by achieving the minimum passing standard in math or English language arts on the grade 10 or 11 TAKS.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Local high schools/postsecondary institutions determine additional student eligibility requirements.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes — 2 courses a semester. Exceptions may be made by the principal and postsecondary partner's chief academic officer for students with outstanding academic performance and capability, as demonstrated by grade point average, SAT or ACT scores, or other criteria.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must annually notify parents of students in grades 9-12 of opportunities to earn college credit through dual enrollment, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or other options. A school district may provide this notification on the district's Web site.

    In addition, during a student's freshman and senior years of high school, a counselor must inform a student and the student's parent about the availability of district programs through which a student may earn college credit, including dual enrollment programs.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Instructors of dual credit courses must be selected by the college. Instructors must either be regularly employed college faculty or meet the same standards and approval procedures used by the college to select faculty for teaching the same courses at the main campus of the college. The college must supervise and evaluate dual credit instructors using the same or comparable procedures used for faculty at the main campus of the college.

    In addition, the college must ensure that the dual credit course and corresponding course at the main campus of the college are equivalent in terms of curriculum, materials, instruction and method/rigor of student evaluation.

    Dual credit partnerships between high schools and postsecondary partners must address faculty selection, supervision and evaluation.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Notes/Citation: While all institutions of higher education must grant credit for dual credit courses, each institution determines the specific course credit, including the number of semester credit hours awarded for dual credit courses.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. Districts must annually report to the Texas Education Agency the number of students who have participated in the college credit program (including dual credit, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, etc.), the number of courses in which students have enrolled and the college credit hours students have earned.
    Program evaluation component Yes. Every local board must establish annual performance goals related to enrollment in advanced courses, including dual or college credit courses. Local boards must annually review data on the district's progress on enrollment in advanced courses, disaggregated by race, gender and socioeconomic status.
    Unique characteristics State policy makes clear that dual credit students must be eligible to use the same or comparable support services that traditional college students use. The college is responsible for ensuring timely and efficient access to support services (academic advising and counseling), learning materials (library resources), and to other benefits for which dual credit students may be eligible.

    Statute directs the commissioner of education to develop a gold performance rating system based on enhanced performance. One of the performance standards on which high schools' gold performance rating should be based on include the percentage of students who successfully complete dual credit courses.

    Statute provides a program for districts with one or more high schools that had at least 26 students in the graduating class and that, for any two consecutive years during the last five years, were among the lowest 10% of high schools in the percentage of students graduating high school and enrolling in a postsecondary institution the following school year. Such districts must enter into an agreement with the closest public institution of higher education (or another institution) to develop a plan to increase the number of graduating seniors who enroll in an institution of higher education the year after graduation. The plan must establish an accurate method of measuring progress that may include the percentage of district students and the percentage of students attending the targeted district high school(s) participating in dual enrollment programs.

    A pilot program created by 2005 legislation provides for a pilot program to waive the tuition and fees of a student concurrently enrolled in high school and a public junior college, and who is eligible for free or reduced lunch. Such students are entitled to free textbooks. Legislation directs the coordinating board to select for participation in the pilot five colleges in various geographic regions of the state that vary significantly in the number of students enrolled. Participating districts must anually report to the Texas Education Agency on enrollment in such dual credit courses.
    Sources TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 28.009, 28.010, 33.007(b)(9), 51.968, 61.1099, 29.904, 31.031, 54.2161, 39.0721; 19 TEX. ADMIN. CODE § 4.81-4.85, 74.25, 66.110

    Utah
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Higher education tuition and fees may not be charged for participation in the concurrent enrollment program, except that each institution within the state's higher education system may charge a one-time per student per institution admissions application fee for concurrent enrollment course credit offered by the institution. The student's district is responsible for covering these costs.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Rule provides that courses must be "offered at the most appropriate location" and that the curriculum and delivery system must "be designed and implemented to take full advantage of the most current available educational technology."
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Student eligibility requirements set by schools and postsecondary partners must include parental permission. "Local schools have the primary responsibility for identifying students" eligible to participate. All participating students must have a current "student education/occupation plan (SEOP)" on file at their school.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Schools and postsecondary partners jointly establish additional student eligibility requirements.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes. State reimbursement to districts may not exceed 30 semester hours per student per year.

    Funding is provided only for participation in 1000- and 2000-level courses, unless an exception is approved by the student's counselor and district concurrent enrollment administrator. Concurrent enrollment courses are limited to English, math, science, social science, humanities, fine arts, world languages and career/technical programs.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Unclear. The concurrent enrollment agreement between a district and higher education institution must "provide for the entity responsible for parent notification about concurrent enrollment purpose(s) and student and family privacy protections."
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. High school teachers must be approved as adjunct faculty and supervised by a state institution of higher education. Nomination of adjunct faculty is the joint responsibility of the district and postsecondary institution, although the appropriate postsecondary institution makes final approval of adjunct faculty.

    Course content, procedures, examinations and teaching materials must be approved by the appropriate department or program at the postsecondary institution to ensure quality and comparability with courses offered on postsecondary campus. High school teachers serving as adjunct faculty must "be included as fully as possible in the academic life of the supervising academic department." Postsecondary institutions and high schools must "share expertise and professional development ... to adequately prepare teachers at all levels to teach concurrent enrollment students and content, including both federal and state laws" on student privacy and student records.

    The scope of concurrent enrollment courses offered must be narrow "enough to ensure coordinated statewide development and training activities for participating teachers."

    Districts must report annually to the state office of education on supervisory services and professional development provided by the postsecondary partner. Districts must also report annually indicating that all concurrent enrollment instructors are in compliance with the faculty requirements in R277-713-7B and C.

    Postsecondary faculty "who have significant unsupervised access to K-12 students" must complete a criminal background check.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. The state board must publish an annual school performance report that provides specified data for every public school, and aggregated at the district and state level. The report must include data on the number of students taking concurrent enrollment courses, and the number and percent of those students who receive college credit for the course.

    Every district must submit an annual report to the state office of education indicating the supervisory services and professional development provided by the postsecondary partner, and noting that all concurrent enrollment instructors are in compliance with R277-713-7B and C.

    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Statute directs two public postsecondary institutions (Snow College in Richfield and the College of Eastern Utah) to work with local districts to develop "an agressive concurrent enrollment program."

    Statute authorizes the state board of education and the board of regents to develop a concurrent enrollment program for Mandarin Chinese, to be taught over the state's two-way interactive video and audio system, EDNET.
    Sources UTAH CODE ANN. § 53A-15-101, 53A-3-602.5(2)(c), 53A-17a-120.5, 53A-17a-104 (x), 53B-16-205(3)(b), 53B-16-207(1)(b), 53A-15-101.5; UTAH ADMIN. CODE R277-713-1 through -9

    Vermont
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program State has two programs: Vermont State Colleges [VSC] Dual Enrollment and No Title. VSC Dual Enrollment allows students who complete a gateway "College Studies" course to receive a voucher for free tuition in up to two college courses; non-VSC entities that sign a memorandum of understanding may also accept dual enrollment students. The second state program allows a secondary technical student to enroll in postsecondary technical courses at the expense of the district of residence if the enrollment is accepted by the postsecondary institution, approved by the district of residence, and approved for credit toward high school graduation requirements.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • State has both mandatory and voluntary dual enrollment programs
  • Notes/Citation: VSC Dual Enrollment: Mandatory. Technical program: Students may participate only if approved by district of residence and if accepted by the postsecondary institution (student eligibility criteria not set in state policy).
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition VSC Dual Enrollment: Courses are offered tuition-free, with support from GEAR UP and the state's Next Generation Initiative.

    Technical program: Student's district
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both VSC Dual Enrollment Program: Both. Non-VSC entities (i.e., private institutions) that sign a memorandum of understanding may also participate. Technical program: Two-year (students may enroll only in technical courses).
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, the VSC Dual Enrollment Program voucher covers tuition costs for no more than two college courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary credit
  • Notes/Citation: For technical program: Programs must "provide an opportunity for" the student also to receive postsecondary credit, but it is not clear in policy that high school and postsecondary credit are automatically awarded.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For VSC Dual Enrollment Program
  • How state funds participating high schools Not defined
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. However, a state-funded promotional campaign for the VSC Dual Enrollment Program is in its third year as of December 2008.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics VSC Dual Enrollment Program: Any student who completes the "Introduction to College Studies" course receives a voucher for up to two college courses, which may be used at any of the five Vermont State Colleges or at other participating institutions in the state. Tuition free courses are available thanks to GEAR UP and state funds allocated through the Next Generation Initiative fund.
    Sources VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 16, § 1593; Vt. CODE R. 22 000 007 2394; "Vermont State Colleges Dual Enrollment Program" brochure, May 2008; John Fischer, Vermont Department of Education

    Virginia
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program High school students may earn college credit in several ways. In addition to credits for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses, students may earn dual enrollment and/or concurrent enrollment credits. Dual Enrollment agreements between schools and postsecondary institutions (usually community colleges) allow students to earn high school and postsecondary credit; courses are taught by postsecondary faculty, typically at the high school campus. Concurrent Enrollment allows high school students to enroll in a community college course. Such students may or may not receive high school credit, but are not taking the course as part of a contract between the school division and the college.
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: While all high schools are not required to offer dual enrollment per se, Virginia’s community colleges must report annually to the State Council on Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), dual enrollment course enrollment data as part of the state’s annual accountability measures. The 4-year institutions in Virginia are not precluded from offering dual enrollment coursework but are also not required to report on their enrollment figures. In addition, high schools must offer access to at least three college-level coursesstudies — these may be Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge courses, or dual enrollment.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. However, "schools and colleges are encouraged to provide higher school students the opportunity for dual enrollment at no tuition cost to them or their families."
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy. Historically, Virginia’s community colleges have been the primary provider of dual enrollment courses, with very few public 4-year institutions offering dual enrollment in targeted areas.
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • Notes/Citation: For partnerships between high schools and community colleges. Dual enrollment courses are offered primarily at the participating high schools.
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: For dual enrollment opportunities not covered by partnerships between high schools and community colleges. Courses that are not covered by the Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment are termed "concurrent enrollment".
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: For partnerships between high schools and community colleges. While dual enrollment courses are typically offered at the participating high school, in some cases in rural areas, high school students are transported to the college for instruction.
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Notes/Citation: For partnerships between high schools and community colleges. Exceptions may be considered for freshman and sophomore students who are able to demonstrate readiness for college level coursework through the college’s established institutional policies.
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Parental permission
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Local boards must notify students and their parents of the availability of dual enrollment, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and Academic Year Governor's School Programs, and the qualifications for enrolling in such programs.
    Instructor and course quality component Yes, for partnerships between high schools and community colleges. Dual enrollment courses (taught either at the participating high school or college) are taught by college certified faculty members. Courses specially scheduled for high school students at the college or high school must have the same academic rigor as regular college courses and meet all college accreditation standards. The community college must "ensure that all dual enrollment courses taught are equivalent to other instruction by the college, specifically in terms of course objectives, components of the syllabi, level and rigor of content, evaluation of students, textbooks, student outcomes and assessment and faculty evaluation."

    All arrangements must include formal mechanisms to evaluate faculty effectiveness and student success. Dual enrollment instructors must be evaluated using the guidelines adopted for all adjunct faculty. A copy of the evaluation results must be given to the designated district representative. Student evaluations of all dual enrollment adjunct instructors must be held each semester for each course offered. Student evaluation results must be shared with the dean, program lead, faculty member, and designated district representative.

    The community college must also select all faculty, who must "meet the faculty hiring criteria established by the SACS [Southern Association of Colleges and Schools] and state board for community colleges." SACS requires faculty teaching associate's level courses designed for transfer to four-year institutions to hold a minimum of a master's degree with at least 18 graduate hours in the teaching discipline.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • No
  • Notes/Citation: However, the State Policy on Transfer states, "Course content, not method of course delivery (pedagogy), should be the primary determining factor in the acceptance of credit in transfer between Virginia's two- and four-year public colleges and universities." Consequently, four-year public institutions must evaluate dual enrollment coursework in the same manner as coursework completed through traditional means at community colleges. In addition, the Commonwealth College Course Collaborative (CCCC) consists of at least 13 credit hours accepted as transfer credit at participating public two- and four-year institutions and private four-year institutions. However, students may complete dual enrollment courses that fall outside the purview of CCCC courses.
  • Institutional reporting requirement Yes. High schools' School Performance Report Cards must include the percentage of students who take college-level courses, including dual enrollment courses.
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics The superintendent of public instruction must develop and the board of education must approve criteria for determining and recognizing performance in schools and districts. In recognizing district-level performance, the board must include consideration of special district accomplishments, such as numbers of students in dual enrollment, Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses. The Virginia Index of Performance (VIP) has been developed by the Board of Education as an incentive program to recognize school accountability. Included among the performance criteria is "Increase the percentage of high school students taking Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and dual enrollment courses."

    For partnerships between high schools and community colleges: The community college must identify a dual enrollment coordinator to serve as a liaison to the high school. The coordinator must make information sessions available to students and parents, and facilitate meetings between high school and postsecondary stakeholders to address logistics.
    Sources 8 VA. ADMIN. CODE § 20-131-100, 20-160-10; VA CODE ANN. § 22.1-253.13:1(D)(9), 22.1-253.13:3(B), 23-38.88(B)(6); "Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment Between Virginia Public Schools and Community Colleges," March 2008; Commonwealth College Course Collaborative Web site; Linda Wallinger, Virginia Department of Education; Gretchen Schmidt, Virginia Community College System; State Policy on Transfer; July 25, 2007 Virginia Board of Education Guidelines, "An Incentive Program to Encourage and Recognize School Accountability Performance and Competence to Excellence"

    Washington
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Running Start
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • State has both mandatory and voluntary dual enrollment programs
  • Notes/Citation: All eligible students may enroll in programs at community and technical colleges. However, a student may enroll in programs at universities only if the student's local board has decided to participate in the program.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition A student in the Running Start program is not responsible for paying tuition or fees.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year and select four-year institutions if the governing board decides to participate (Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, Washington State University, and The Evergreen State College). Accredited tribal colleges may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program
  • Notes/Citation: The Web site of the office of the superintendent of public instruction must post information on online programs allowing high school students to earn college credit. High schools must ensure that teachers and counselors have information about online programs to earn college credit, including Running Start, and are able to assist students and parents in accessing this information. High schools must ensure that students and parents have opportunities to learn about online programs that allow students to earn college credit.
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Institutions of higher education, in consultation with school districts, may establish admissions standards for students.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.

    A district and postsecondary representative may jointly limit a student's concurrent high school and postsecondary enrollment to not less than the equivalent of full-time enrollment for academic reasons. The "equivalent of full-time enrollment" might mean for example, one-third FTE enrollment in regular high school courses and two-thirds FTE enrollment in college courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must annually provide information about Running Start to all students in grades 10 and 11 and their parents. In addition, high schools and any other schools serving grade 9 must annually provide parents of students in grades 9-12 with information about the entrance requirements and availability of local programs that lead to college credit, including Running Start.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics Homeschool and private school students may participate.

    Once a student has enrolled in a postsecondary course or program, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Districts in Washington and community colleges in Idaho and Oregon may enter into agreements to allow 11th and 12th grade students to earn high school and postsecondary credit. Such agreements must adhere to RCW 28A.600.310 through .360 and 28A.600.380 through .400. A district agreement may allow the community college to accept an amount less than the statewide uniform rate set in 28A.600.310(2) if the community college does not charge students tuition and fees. To the extent feasible, such agreements must permit students to attend the community college without paying tuition or fees. Agreements may not permit community colleges to charge nonresident tuition and fee rates. Agreements must ensure that students may enroll only in courses transferable to the Washington two-year, tribal and select four-year institutions from which students in traditional dual enrollment programs would earn postsecondary credits.

    Legislation enacted in 2007 directs the superintendent of public instruction to establish skill centers of excellence in key economic sectors of regional significance. Once the skill centers are established, the superintendent must seek funding for a running start for career and technical education grant program to develop and implement career and technical programs targeted to regionally determined high-demand occupations. Grant recipients should be partnerships of skill centers of excellence, community college centers of excellence, tech-prep programs, industry advisory committees, area workforce development councils, and skill panels in the related industry.
    Sources WASH. REV. CODE ANN. § 28A.600.300 through .400, 28A.245.050, 28A.300.118(2), 28A.300.119; WASH. ADMIN. CODE § 131-46-077, 392-169-005 through -125

    West Virginia
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program While "Dual Enrollment" and "Dual Credit" are used in some passages of statute and regulations, procedural rules by the higher education policy commission and council for community and technical college education use neither term, referring instead to "guidelines for the offering of college courses for high school students."
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: While all local boards must adopt policies allowing students to complete college-level work, it is not clear that all public postsecondary institutions must accept high school students who meet minimum requirements.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. Postsecondary institutions may offer dual enrollment students a tuition rate that is equal to only 75% of the lowest tuition rate offered by any public institution.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. Students may participate only in lower-division courses.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Yes. Any off-campus course must meet the same standards as required for on-campus instruction, and must use the equivalent syllabus, text, assignments, assessments, evaluation of students and evaluation of faculty as an on-campus course. High school teachers teaching dual enrollment courses must be assigned adjunct part-time faculty status, and such employment must be consistent with state and institutional standards on the employment of part-time adjunct faculty. Credentials of high school and postsecondary faculty teaching dual enrollment courses must be approved by the chief academic officer of the institution and department granting the credit.

    Postsecondary
    : All faculty, whether the course is offered on the college or high school campus, must meet hte minimum faculty credential requirements for instructional rank at the college granting the credit.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Yes
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy. While each institution offering college credits for high school students must maintain records of dual enrollment courses and enrollments, reports of such information must be submitted only "as deemed necessary."
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics In determining criteria for "exemplary" school and district accreditation status, the state board awards districts "bonus points" for dual credit completers.

    In addition, state standards for evaluating schools must include indicators of exemplary student, school and school system performance and progress. One such indicator is the percentage of students successfully completing dual credit, Advanced Placement and honors courses.

    Performance indicators adopted by the state council for community and technical college education include enrollment in early admission and dual credit courses delivered by community and technical colleges for high school students.
    Sources W. VA. CODE § 18-2E-5(f)(10) and (g)(3); W. VA. CODE ST. R. § 133-19-1 through -10, 135-6-4.5.5, 135-19-1 through -10; Mark Stotler, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission

    Wisconsin
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program Youth Options Program
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Mandatory
  • Notes/Citation: However, postsecondary admission is contingent on space available for non-dual-enrollment students. A technical college district board may deny admission to a student who has a record of disciplinary problems. In addition, a school board may not allow an at-risk student to participate at a technical college, and may refuse a student's request to attend a technical college if the student is a child with a disability and the board determines the payment to the technical college district board, adjusted to reflect the cost of any special services required for the student, would impose an undue financial burden on the school district.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition The student's school district is responsible for paying all tuition costs for courses taken for high school credit. A student who receives a failing grade must reimburse the district. A student who takes a course solely for post-secondary credit is responsible for all costs.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private, nonprofit institutions and tribal colleges may also participate.
    Where courses provided
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Notes/Citation: The purpose of the Youth Options program is not to give students a "leg up" on college credits, but to allow them to take advanced coursework not available through their high school.
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: For programs at technical colleges: "good academic standing" and written parental approval.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, a local board may limit the number of credits for which it will pay to 18 college credit hours per student.
    Notes/Citation: One college credit is equal to .25 high school credits; so a 3 credit college course is equal to .75 high school credits.
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: A student intending to enroll in a postsecondary course must notify the district of such intent. This notification must indicate whether the student is taking the course for high school or postsecondary credit. If the student is taking the course solely for postsecondary credit the costs are the responsibility of the student. Courses taken for high school credit also earn postsecondary credit.
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. All students in grades 9-11 must be annually notified of the program.
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy. Instructors must meet the requirements of the postsecondary institution.
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Partial. No reporting requirements exisit for private or tribal colleges.

    University of Wisconsin system schools (both 2- and 4-year) must comply with University of Wisconsin System reporting requirements.

    Technical college districts must annually compile for the technical college system board that indicates the number of high school students attending a technical college of the district. The following information must be disaggregated by students in the Youth Options program and students under compulsory school attendance:
  • The student's social security number or other unique identifiable number
  • The student's name and birth date
  • The student's school district of enrollment and school district of residence
  • The student's highest secondary school grade completed
  • Except for students completing advanced standing courses, the technical college district course or courses the student completed and the amount of postsecondary credit awarded, if any.
  • If applicable, the student's year of high school graduation.

    The technical college system board must submit an annual report to the department of administration, department of children and families, department of public instruction, department of workforce development and the legislature. The report must indicate the number of people who earned technical college credit through the Youth Options program, the courses given in high schools for which a pupil may receive technical college credit and the number of students enrolled in the courses for technical college credit in the previous school year.
  • Local school districts must include youth options courses in yearly course offering reports.

    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics

    A district must inform a student and the student's parent if the student's timetable for graduation may be negatively affected if the student participates in the Youth Options program.

    A district is not required to pay for courses offered by the district that are 80% comparable to the courses requested.

    Sources WIS. STAT. § 118.55, 38.04(21)(c) and (d); WIS. ADMIN. CODE § 40.01 through .09, 9.01 through .03

    Wyoming
    Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
    Statewide policy in place
  • Yes
  • Definition or title of program No title
    Offering mandatory or voluntary
  • Voluntary
  • Notes/Citation: However, districts and postsecondary partners must make postsecondary education options programs reasonably accessible to eligible students.
  • Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition The student's school district is responsible for paying all tuition and fee costs.
    College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
    Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Other
  • Notes/Citation: Off-[postsecondary]campus center, higher education center that is part of a college outreach cooperative education services agreement entered into by one or more community college districts and one or more school districts, facility other than a high school maintained by the participating district.
  • Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
  • Notes/Citation: Must be based on criteria established by the university or community college in collaboration with the department of education, and must address student grade level, uniform prior curricula requirements, academic achievement levels and national exam performance indicators.
  • Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
    Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned
  • Secondary and postsecondary credit
  • How state funds participating high schools Equal
    How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
    Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
    Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
    Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits
  • Unclear
  • Institutional reporting requirement Not set in state policy
    Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
    Unique characteristics None identified
    Sources WYO. STAT. ANN. § 21-20-201



    © 2013 by the Education Commission of the States (ECS). All rights reserved. ECS is the only nationwide, nonpartisan interstate compact devoted to education.

    To request permission to excerpt part of this publication, either in print or electronically, please fax a request to the attention of the ECS Communications Department, 303.296.8332 or e-mail ecs@ecs.org.

    Helping State Leaders Shape Education Policy